What recreational drugs cause weight loss


Recreational drugs and their neurological consequences


Seizures may occur, particularly with the more rapid and higher levels achieved when cocaine is injected or smoked as “crack”. Hyperpyrexia may develop because of direct effects on the hypothalamus and also the agitation and hyperactivity that these stimulant drugs tend to produce. These may contribute along with muscle vasoconstriction, central rigidity, and seizures to the rhabdomyolysis that sometimes occurs in more sick patients. Chronic amphetamine (and to a lesser extent cocaine) use may be complicated by a psychosis with visual and auditory hallucinations, often with paranoia, though without the sympathomimetic effects of these drugs. These factors may all change the half lives of cocaine metabolites, their metabolic pathways, and their effects on the blood vessels. For example, the beading of large arteries has also been reported with phenylpropanolamine, ephedrine, and pseudoephedrine. The drug has also been associated in small numbers of patients with both intracranial haemorrhage and cerebral infarction. Coma may also result in a patient awakening with compressive nerve palsies, especially of the lateral popliteal and ulnar nerves. They may occur with obvious infective endocarditis and embolic infarcts, but the following may also be seen in patients without obvious endocarditis: Convulsions or dystonic posturing may occur and the patient may progress to coma. The patients may complain of numbness, and with the combination of the anaesthesia and mental changes, they may self mutilate. Autonomic disturbances in the hands and feet may occur. It is also appropriate for those who have been exposed to the cardiac effects of cocaine and amphetamines. On the one hand, this is looking for evidence of infection or inflammation, and on the other it also looks for subarachnoid haemorrhage which may co-exist with any form of stroke in these patients—for example, with heroin, cocaine, or amphetamine.


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NIHSeniorHealth : Prescription and Illicit Drug Abuse


Prescription and Illicit Drug Abuse. Illicit drugs cause a much more intense and longer lasting increase in dopamine. So, the things we normally enjoy are no longer pleasurable, and even the effects of the drug aren’t as strong as they once were. For more on drugs and the brain, see “Drugs, Brains and Behavior: The Science of Addiction.” In fact, the number of current illicit drug users aged 50-59 more than tripled between 2002 and 2012, from 900,000 to more than 3.0 million. More older adults are also seeking treatment for substance abuse and having increased hospitalizations and visits to emergency rooms (up more than 130 percent in 55-64 year-olds from 2004 to 2009) related to illicit drug use. Marijuana, made from the cannabis plant, is the most abused illicit drug among people 50 and older. For more about marijuana and its effects on the body, see “Drug Facts: Marijuana." For more about heroin and its effects on the body, see “Drug Facts: Heroin.” Illicit Drugs and Aging.


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Krokodil, Molly, and K2 : Drug Facts


You can find Molly at concerts, festivals and anywhere teens and young adults gather. Between 5% and 7% of high-schoolers have tried what they thought was Molly, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse . Molly is popular at parties and concerts, and some bands have sung about it. “The buzz about Molly is the result of widespread misconceptions about what the drug really is,” says David Sack, MD, an expert in addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine. Molly today is neither pure nor safe, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration. “Molly is whatever the seller wants to say is Molly. Molly has been tied with a number of overdoses and deaths nationwide. Molly, or MDMA, has left people with severe muscle tension and seizures as well as dangerous overheating. “Most of the time,” says Sack, “Molly is a mixture of any number of synthetic drugs, many of which are more dangerous and less predictable than MDMA.”


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6 Most - Common Drugs That Cause Weight Gain


Unfortunately, all drugs have side effects, and weight gain is common to many drugs. Doctors often do not address this when prescribing medicine, despite weight gain being very troubling for the patient. 1 When the histamine receptor is blocked, its effect on appetite is decreased, leading to increased food intake and weight gain. Alternatives: Ask your doctor about inhaled medications for allergies which are not generally associated with weight gain. This paradoxical effect is not completely understood, though likely has to do with the complex interaction between serotonin and other appetite regulating mechanisms. Certain SSRIs, like Prozac, are associated with short term weight loss, though this is temporary and long-term data show a weight-neutral or weight gain effect. And while prednisone is a catabolic hormone, meaning it causes the breakdown of fat and protein, these effects are more than offset by its appetite stimulating properties. The weight gain associated with these medications is often rapid and significant, with research showing as much as a 37 pound weight gain during the course of treatment. People taking these medications need to be aware of the potential for weight gain and work with a qualified professional to mitigate this side effect as much as possible. Since weight loss is a primary goal of treating type 2 diabetes, it seems illegal that some of the most commonly used drugs to lower blood sugar can cause significant weight gain. The result is a lower blood sugar but often 10 or more extra pounds of fat, which can then increase medication requirements and cause more fat storage. But if you are taking a medication that can contribute to weight gain, it helps to know ahead of time and create a plan to attempt to negate some of the weight gain side effect.


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And Alcohol Use on Weight Change - Drug Abuse Treatment


The long-term abuse of ecstasy may result in serious muscle tissue damage and the release of muscle enzymes into the blood. Drug seeking behavior, which commonly occurs due to cocaine abuse, can also reduce the appetite thereby causing individuals to forget to eat properly and eventually begin to lose weight. The cessation of prolonged cocaine use leads to an increase in appetite and subsequent weight gain in some individuals. Poor nutrition leads to serious health problems, and many diseases that may develop secondarily due to drug abuse also have associated weight changes. Dramatic weight loss due to substance abuse increases the risk of suffering from low blood sugar, heart arrhythmias, electrolyte and mineral imbalances, gallstones and alterations in blood pressure. High blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, sleep apnea, kidney disease, respiratory problems, cancer and osteoarthritis are among the many long-term health problems that may develop due to weight gain that is concurrent with substance abuse [25] . In general, the abuse of recreational, illicit, and prescription drugs can all result in similarly disastrous long-term effects on health – with dramatic vacillations in body weight, both up and down. Due to this mismatch between available treatment, and the people who are in desperate need of it, substance abuse continues to be a major public health issue. In addition to causing harmful fluctuations in weight, substance abuse can lead to multiple major organ damage, especially to the kidneys and heart [27] . People who have health problems such as arthritis or diabetes tend to worsen their symptoms and even speed up the progression of their condition through drug abuse, with any associated weight changes potentially compounding the damage done. Even relatively mild symptoms such as these can make it quite difficult for people to overcome their substance abuse without the guidance of medical and treatment professionals. The skinny on cocaine: insights into eating behavior and body weight in cocaine-dependent men. Handbook of the medical consequences of alcohol and drug abuse.


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Sudden Loss of Appetite and Weight Loss - Health Guidance


Sudden Loss of Appetite and Weight Loss. While many of us wish that we could shift some weight, and wouldn't see a loss of appetite as necessarily an entirely bad turn of affairs, it is nevertheless a cause for concern if this loss of appetite and weight loss come on suddenly and without any obvious trigger – as this could be the sign of a medical or psychological condition. Following are some reasons for a sudden loss of appetite and accompanying weight loss. Depression is a common cause for a loss of appetite and weight loss, and other symptoms are of course a low mood, feelings of worthless, low energy, lack of interest and low libido. If you suspect that you are suffering from depression then you should see a therapist who can help talk you through your problems, teach you useful strategies for combating the feelings and thoughts leading to depression, and potentially prescribe medication. Depression can also be caused by an event such as the loss of a loved one, and in this case it should pass after a time. This is not always caused by a lack of body image or a desire to lose weight, but can sometimes be a more complex physical manifestation of psychological and emotional problems. Anxiety and stress can both result in a lack of appetite, as well as in a state of heightened excitability which will result in your body burning more calories. Sometimes a flu or the common cold can cause you to have a lack of appetite resulting in weight loss. This results in stomach ache and may cause vomiting after eating. Gastritis is a similar condition that can also cause weight loss and lack of appetite. One of the major concerns for those facing sudden lack of appetite and weight loss is that a serious condition such as cancer might be involved. A zinc deficiency can also cause lack of appetite, and this can be handled with supplementation or changes in diet. In some cases loss of appetite can be a side effect of drugs and these can include medications taken for health reasons, as well as recreational drugs.


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Recreational drug use - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


The reasons for drug use appear to have as much to do with needs for friendship, pleasure and status as they do with unhappiness or poverty. The amount and type of risks that come with recreational drug use vary widely with the drug and the amount being used. There are many factors in the environment and the user that interact with each drug differently. Overall, some studies suggest that alcohol is one of the most dangerous of all recreational drugs; only heroin, crack cocaine, and methamphetamines are judged to be more harmful. [6] [7] [8] [9] Experts in the UK offer that some drugs that may be causing less harm, to fewer users (although they are also used less frequently in the first place) include Cannabis, psilocybin mushrooms, LSD, and ecstasy. Advocates of this philosophy point to the many well-known artists and intellectuals who have used drugs, experimentally or otherwise, with few detrimental effects on their lives. [12] Harm reduction seeks to minimize the harm that can occur through the use of various drugs, whether legal (e.g., alcohol and nicotine), or illegal (e.g., heroin and cocaine). Many movements and organizations are advocating for or against the liberalization of the use of recreational drugs , notably cannabis legalization . Depressants are widely used throughout the world as prescription medicines and as illicit substances . Antihistamines are widely available over the counter at drug stores (without a prescription), in the form of allergy medication and some cough medicines . The most commonly used are hydroxyzine , mainly to stretch out a supply of other drugs, as in medical use, and the above-mentioned ethanolamine and alkylamine-class first-generation antihistamines, which are - once again as in the 1950s - the subject of medical research into their anti-depressant properties. MDMA: The "euphoriant drugs such as MDMA (‘ecstasy’) and MDEA (‘eve’)" are popular amongst young adults. Inhalants are gases , aerosols , or solvents that are breathed in and absorbed through the lungs.


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What kind of recreational drugs have weight loss as a side


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Cocaine, MDMA, Ketamine, GHB, Heroin, Marijuana and Hair Loss


Cocaine, MDMA, Ketamine, GHB, Heroin, Marijuana and Hair Loss. But can recreational drug use cause hair loss ? Taking recreational drugs causes a significant rise in adrenalin levels and this can affect the body and subsequently the hair growth cycle. The most commonly used recreational drugs are cocaine, MDMA (esctasy), cannabis and Diacetylmorphine (heroin). How Do Drugs Cause Hair Loss – The Expert View. Senior hair loss specialist at the Belgravia Centre in London, Leonora Doclis, says, “All recreational drugs have the potential to cause a type of hair loss called Telogen Effluvium because taking drugs causes a shock to the system. Can Drug Use Trigger Permanent Hair Loss? The Belgravia Centre has a team of experts who will be able to ascertain the cause of your hair loss and advise on the best solution. Further Studies That Show Drugs Cause Hair Loss. Hair loss may be connected to adulterated drugs.


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What recreational drugs have been proven to


An early twenties female has been losing hair for about 4 months: In the last two months, she's had coke about eight times, done shrooms twice, and e twice. I've googled it and the connection between cocaine and hair loss seems to come mainly from anti-drug propaganda with no real proof. Since this person was losing hair before experimenting further with drugs, it seems doubtful that they have caused it. Otherwise losing your hair is the last thing you should worry about when doing recreational drugs. She saw a doctor who told her the hair and scalp look healthy, but at her request he did some blood tests on hormones and the like. If you are going to run a rough enough steroid, or a high dose of testosterone, then you might want to take another drug with this steroid, so as to prevent the testosterone from aromatizing. If you aren't aware of this, and also overdose steroids or use ones that are more likely to unnecessarily elevate DHT levels (while also the person would be unaware how to prevent this from happening excessively), then yes, steroids will probably make you go bald. Like I said, it's been going on for four months but has gotten worse in the last month. I would guess iron deficiency or some other nutrient, but if you saw a doctor and they did blood tests that showed normal I don't know. Its not the drugs, per se, its that after u do the drugs u want more drugs, and its stressfull when u cant have em, thats why your hair falls out. So the doctor I saw called today and said that I have high levels of testosterone and another hormone that causes hair loss. Hope you can make the best of this :) I have no evidence to back this up though and maybe it wasn't the ecstasy that did it. Yeah, I have no evidence too but I think it's connected, I feel sorry for the guy I know, he's very ugly with this kind of maculated alopecia. The fact is, many elderly men take Viagra, and they don't stop dying of old age for doing so (otherwise Viagra would be an immortality drug).


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Illegal Drugs – Drug and Alcohol Addiction Recovery


The physical signs of being an addict can vary depending on the person and the drug being abused. Crack cocaine use can result in a period of full-blown paranoid psychosis, in which the user loses touch with reality and experiences auditory hallucinations. With physical dependence, the body has adapted to the presence of the drug and withdrawal symptoms may occur if use is reduced or stopped. Effects of Heroin Addiction and Abuse – Illegal Drugs. When a user begins to seek out and take the drug compulsively, that person is said to be dependent on the drug or addicted to it. Marijuana smokers end up using the drug compulsively even though it interferes with family, school, work, and recreational activities. Drug craving and withdrawal symptoms can make it hard for long-term marijuana smokers to stop using the drug. The effects of this drug are enhanced when mixed with alcohol causing; sedation, loss of a inhibitions, relaxation, blackouts and amnesia. The drug takes effect after about 20 to 30 minutes and effects may last as long as 8 to 12 hours. When combined with alcohol, Rohypnol causes severe disorientation and the classic “blackouts” that it is known for. Rohypnol Use Signs and Symptoms – Illegal Drugs.


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Medication and Drug Guide


Medication and Drug Guide. Examples and Street Names: beer, wine, whiskey, etc. Potential Benefits: These are stimulants and decrease the need for sleep and food, and produce feelings similar to cocaine. Potential Detriments: Low dosages can cause increased breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure, and dilated pupils. Examples and Street Names: coffee, tea, soda, and chocolate. Potential Benefits: Results in energy and decreased appetite. Potential Detriments: Can cause agitation, hypertension (leading to possible cardiac conditions), and anxiety. Potential Benefits: Hallucinogens can cause visions (visual, auditory, and tactile hallucinations), altered perception of reality, mood, and thinking. Examples and Street Names: paints, fuel, glue, and freon. Potential Benefits: Produces feelings of euphoria, excitement, and sensations of floating. Potential Detriments: Can result in dizziness, slurred speech, brain damage, respiratory disorders, seizures, and death. Potential Benefits: Can produce feelings of calmness and energy, increases metabolism. Examples and Street Names: morphine, heroin, codeine, and methadone. Examples and Street Names: (PCP)


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Weight Loss and Drug Abuse


Loss of appetite, reduced interest in favorite foods, nausea when eating and "forgetting" to eat are all common precursors to weight loss in drug abusers. Stimulant abusers also might experience increased energy, irritability and reduced need for sleep while in the throes of a drug binge. In combination with weight loss, the effects of drugs like cocaine, alcohol or opiates can lead to even more serious problems. The only way to avoid excessive weight loss while abusing drugs is to abstain from using drugs altogether. Drug abusers can lower their risk of harmful weight loss by taking periodic breaks from drug use and incorporating healthy diet and exercise habits into their daily lives. In some cases, excessive weight loss in drug users can stem from diseases acquired through drug use, such as HIV or hepatitis.


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Involuntary Weight Loss - Special Subjects - Merck Manuals


Herbal products and OTC drugs. Some malabsorptive disorders: GI tract surgery and cystic fibrosis. Severe, chronic heart and lung disorders: COPD, heart failure (stage III or IV), restrictive lung disease. With chronic kidney disease and heart failure, accumulation of edema may mask loss of lean body weight. Such patients should be taught how to ensure adequate caloric intake and have a follow-up evaluation in about 1 mo that includes a weight measurement. If weight loss continues and all other findings remain normal, further testing (eg, CT, MRI) should be considered. If behavioral measures are ineffective and weight loss is extreme, enteral tube feeding can be tried if patients have a functioning GI tract. Normal age-related changes that can contribute to weight loss include the following: In the elderly, multiple chronic disorders often contribute to weight loss. It is difficult to sort out the exact contribution of specific factors because of the interactions between factors such as depression, loss of function, drugs, dysphagia, dementia, and social isolation.


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Recreational drugs and what they do to your body


Once the user inhales the drug, the effects are experienced immediately and last for two to five minutes. The effects usually last for several hours with the user feeling particularly hyperactive, and very awake. Amphetamine use elevates the mood of the user and long term use can lead to a strong dependence. When a regular amphetamine user stops taking the drug, feelings of depression, lethargy and extreme hunger set in. The user experiences an indifference to pain and tiredness. The effects of crack can be felt by the user almost immediately and last for about 10 minutes. Feelings of well-being, exhilaration, a loss of appetite, increased confidence and an indifference to pain and fatigue are experienced by the user. However, the crack user often experiences hallucinations and paranoia. Effects are experienced after 20-60 minutes and can last for three to six hours. Large doses of the drug can lead to anxiety, panic and confusion. After using the drug people often feel tired, depressed and hungry. Heroin also detaches the user from feelings of pain and worry.


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Wellbutrin - Side Effects, Dosage


The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) originally approved Wellbutrin as a treatment for depression in 1985. It approved the sustained-release version (Wellbutrin SR) in 1996 and the extended-release version (Wellbutrin XL) in 2003. A: Changes in weight and appetite are common side effects of Wellbutrin (bupropion). Q: What's the difference between Wellbutrin XR and Wellbutrin SR? Q: What are the side effects of Wellbutrin 100 mg? A: Here are some of the side effects of Wellbutrin. Q: What is the difference between Wellbutrin SR and Wellbutrin XR? This is not a complete list of the side effects associated with Wellbutrin. Q: What are the long-term effects of taking Wellbutrin? Wellbutrin is approved for the treatment of depression and as an adjunct in smoking cessation. I heard of a person that ended up in the ER with 3 glasses of wine and Wellbutrin. A: The Wellbutrin is not approved for use for anxiety and this may be why you are still experiencing high anxiety. Q: What are the side effects of Wellbutrin? According to the prescribing information for Wellbutrin, there are a wide variety of muscular side effects that have been reported with Wellbutrin. A: Wellbutrin (bupropion) is approved for the treatment of depression.


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Bipolar disorder : MedlinePlus Medical


The depressive episode may include these symptoms: This can make the symptoms and suicide risk worse. Depression and mania symptoms may occur together. Talk to family members about your symptoms and overall health. With medicines, you may begin to feel better. Or side effects from the medicines may occur. As a result, you may be tempted to stop taking your medicine or change the way you are taking them. Ask family members or friends to help you take medicines the right way. You will need regular visits with a psychiatrist to talk about your medicines and their possible side effects. People who are in the middle of a severe manic or depressive episode may need to stay in a hospital until they are stable and their behavior is under control. Joining a support group may help you and your loved ones. Involving family members and caregivers in your treatment may help reduce the chance of symptoms returning. Watch for the return of symptoms, and know what to do when they return. They may also have problems with relationships, school, work, and finances. You are not taking medicine the right way.


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Commonly Abused Drugs Charts


For more information, see the Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs Research Report. Insomnia, anxiety, tremors, sweating, increased heart rate and blood pressure, psychotic thoughts. Dangerous slowdown of heart rate and breathing, coma, death. Euphoria, increased alertness and arousal, increased blood pressure and heart rate, depression, inability to concentrate, irritability, loss of appetite, insomnia. Increased heart rate, blood pressure; further slowing of mental processing and reaction time. Increased wakefulness and physical activity; decreased appetite; increased breathing, heart rate, blood pressure, temperature; irregular heartbeat. Pregnancy: premature delivery; separation of the placenta from the uterus; low birth weight; lethargy; heart and brain problems. Masks the depressant effect of alcohol, increasing risk of alcohol overdose; may increase blood pressure and jitters. Low doses: slight increase in breathing rate; increased blood pressure and heart rate; shallow breathing; face redness and sweating; numbness of the hands or feet; problems with movement. Increased alertness, attention, energy; increased blood pressure and heart rate; narrowed blood vessels; increased blood sugar; opened-up breathing passages. Masks the depressant action of alcohol, increasing risk of alcohol overdose; may increase blood pressure and jitters.


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Drugs and the brain - Live Well - NHS Choices


Drugs and the brain. Short term: People smoke  cannabis to relax and get high, but it can make it difficult to remember things, even if they’ve only just happened. Short term: Cocaine is a stimulant that makes you feel high, confident and full of energy. Users of cocaine can end up feeling tired and depressed. Long term: Giving up cocaine and crack can be mentally distressing and physically difficult for dependent users. Long-term use can worsen existing mental health problems and lead to depression, anxiety and paranoia. People can become psychologically dependent on the feelings of euphoria and calmness that ecstasy gives them. Research shows that taking ecstasy can reduce a user’s serotonin levels, and may have an effect on certain areas of the brain. Short term: Ketamine is an anaesthetic that makes people feel relaxed and high, but its effects are unpredictable. "The longer term effects are more difficult to pinpoint, but may include flashbacks and losing your memory and ability to concentrate," says Barnes. Short term: Solvents make you feel drunk and sometimes cause hallucinations. Short term: Speed can quickly make you feel energetic and confident but, with the high, can come panic, irritability and a paranoid sense that everyone is looking at you. Steroids can make sleep difficult and cause confusion, depression and paranoia.


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EPHEDRA : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings


And Hu, G. J., and Oh, D. Q., and Zhang, J. And Miller, D. M., and Wang, P. H., and Kim, H. A., and Ko, B. R., and Datta, S. S., and Lee, B. B., and Datta, S. H., and Lee, Y.


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Involuntary Weight Loss - Special Subjects


*Features include symptoms and the results of the doctor's examination. People's symptoms and doctors' findings on physical examination suggest the cause of weight loss in about half of people, including many people eventually diagnosed with cancer. When the history and physical examination do not suggest specific causes, some doctors do a series of tests, including a chest x-ray, blood tests, and urinalysis, to narrow down a cause. If all test results are normal, doctors usually reevaluate the person within a few months to see if new symptoms or findings have developed. Feedings through a tube inserted into the stomach are a last resort and are worthwhile only in certain specific situations. Older people are more likely to have involuntary weight loss because disorders that cause weight loss are more common among older people. There are also normal age-related changes that contribute to weight loss. Normal age-related changes that can contribute to weight loss include the following: Depression and dementia are very common contributing factors, particularly among nursing home residents. Tests are done based on the person's symptoms and findings on physical examination. Extensive testing is not usually needed to identify the cause of weight loss.


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Recreational Drugs. What are recreational drugs? Advice


There are numerous problems which the use of drugs can cause. They can make you feel sick or weak. It can make you feel happy and relaxed. The after effect, or "comedown", can make you feel very low. It can make you confused and frightened. A good trip can make you feel relaxed and happy. A bad trip can make you feel frightened and make you panic. It can make you frightened and confused. They can give you problems sleeping and make you feel tired. Either on your own, or with the person you are worried about, you can go and speak to your GP and ask advice. Or you can contact one of the many organisations that help people who are misusing drugs. They can give you advice and support.


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Why Do Drugs Make You Lose Weight?12 Keys Rehab Center


Although unhealthy weight loss from taking drugs can result, it can also cause serious and sometimes permanent health and lifestyle damage. There are a wide variety of drugs that make you lose weight. This class of drug sometimes includes legitimate weight loss drugs sold on a prescription and over the counter basis. Although addiction medicine professionals recognize changes in weight — including unhealthy weight loss — as a symptom of drug abuse, the mechanisms by which drugs alter appetite and metabolism remain unclear. Drugs That Make You Lose Weight. If you or someone you care about is using drugs because of the temporary weight loss effects, understanding why drugs make people lose weight and how to safely achieve a healthy physique is essential. The only way to beat metabolic syndrome is to make extreme lifestyle changes that include quitting drugs, getting regular exercise and eating a diet comprised of healthy nutrients. What to Do if Drugs Are Making You Lose Weight. The bottom line is that an individual who abuses drugs harms his body, his mind and his lifestyle — not only his weight. If you noticed that drugs are making you lose weight, there may be other problems underneath.


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Loss of appetite - Symptom Checker – Medical


What Is a Decreased Appetite? These can be serious if left untreated, so it is important to find the reason behind your decreased appetite and treat it. What Causes A Decreased Appetite? In most cases, your appetite will return to normal once the original condition is treated. ( NIH, 2010 ) Your appetite may also tend to decrease when you are sad, depressed, grieving, or anxious. Boredom and stress have also been linked to a decreased appetite. Some medications and drugs may reduce your appetite. If the cause is a bacterial or viral infection you will usually not require treatment, as your appetite will quickly return once your infection is cured. This will help your doctor to assess your nutritional intake and the extent of your decreased appetite. It may then be necessary to conduct tests to find the cause of your decreased appetite. If your decreased appetite has resulted in malnutrition, you may be given nutrients through an intravenous (IV) line. What Is the Outcome if Decreased Appetite Is Not Treated? If your decreased appetite is caused by a short-term condition, you are likely to recover naturally without any long-term effects. However, if your decreased appetite is caused by a medical condition, the condition could worsen without treatment. If left untreated, your decreased appetite can also be accompanied with more severe symptoms, such as:


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Experts explain how certain prescription drugs


Certain prescription drugs used to treat mood disorders, seizures, migraines, diabetes , and even high blood pressure can cause weight gain - sometimes 10 pounds a month. But even if you suspect a prescription medication is causing weight gain, never stop taking the drug without consulting your doctor, experts stress. Even if a medication causes weight gain, "an extra 10 pounds may be worth the trade-off of what that medication is doing for your overall health," she says.


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Drug addiction Symptoms - Mayo Clinic


For some people, the drug use becomes more frequent. The risk of addiction and how fast you become dependent varies by drug. As time passes, you may need larger doses of the drug to get high. Soon you may need the drug just to feel good. As your drug use increases, you may find that it's increasingly difficult to go without the drug. Attempts to stop drug use may cause intense cravings and make you feel physically ill (withdrawal symptoms). Feeling that you have to use the drug regularly — this can be daily or even several times a day. Focusing more and more time and energy on getting and using the drug. Experiencing withdrawal symptoms when you attempt to stop taking the drug. Signs and symptoms of drug use or intoxication may vary, depending on the type of drug. Seek emergency help if you or someone you know has taken a drug and:


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What recreational drugs have been proven to


An early twenties female has been losing hair for about 4 months: In the last two months, she's had coke about eight times, done shrooms twice, and e twice. I've googled it and the connection between cocaine and hair loss seems to come mainly from anti-drug propaganda with no real proof. Otherwise losing your hair is the last thing you should worry about when doing recreational drugs. She saw a doctor who told her the hair and scalp look healthy, but at her request he did some blood tests on hormones and the like. If you aren't aware of this, and also overdose steroids or use ones that are more likely to unnecessarily elevate DHT levels (while also the person would be unaware how to prevent this from happening excessively), then yes, steroids will probably make you go bald. Like I said, it's been going on for four months but has gotten worse in the last month. Its not the drugs, per se, its that after u do the drugs u want more drugs, and its stressfull when u cant have em, thats why your hair falls out. So the doctor I saw called today and said that I have high levels of testosterone and another hormone that causes hair loss. Hope you can make the best of this. I have no evidence to back this up though and maybe it wasn't the ecstasy that did it. Yeah, I have no evidence too but I think it's connected, I feel sorry for the guy I know, he's very ugly with this kind of maculated alopecia.


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BBC - KS3 Bitesize Science - Diet, drugs and health


Drugs are substances that have effects on the body. Some recreational drugs are legal, such as tobacco, alcohol and caffeine. Most other recreational drugs are illegal, such as cannabis, ecstasy and heroin. Recreational drugs can be classified as depressants or stimulants. All drugs can damage the liver, because it is the liver that breaks drugs down in the body. Any drug that is misused can cause damage to the body, as well as personal and social problems. Depressants slow down messages in the brain and along the nerves. Some of the long-term effects of depressants on the body include damage to the liver, brain and heart. Stimulants speed up messages in the brain and along the nerves. They make you feel more energetic and confident, but they can damage the liver and heart.


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HIV and AIDS Information : : Unintentional weight loss


Unintentional weight loss. Weight loss, or wasting, is one of the most common symptoms of untreated HIV infection, and can occur at any stage of infection. Weight loss occurs when the body is using up more nutrients than it is absorbing from food. You may eat less than you used to (and need to) because of loss of appetite during ill health. The most important ways to prevent weight loss are to treat HIV-related infections promptly, and to ensure that your nutritional intake is adequate. A dietician can help you look at your diet to ensure you have an adequate intake of all the main types of nutrients, and recommend any changes to fit in with any drugs you are taking and to help you cope with problems such as nausea. You can help by taking symptoms such as loss of appetite, persistent nausea and diarrhoea seriously and seeking prompt medical advice. However, weight loss can still occur in people taking anti-HIV drugs and needs to be taken very seriously as some research suggests that unintentionally losing 5% of your body weight in a six-month period is an indicator that you could become seriously ill because of HIV. If you have been unwell and have lost weight as a result, then taking HIV treatment is likely to help you to increase your weight and lean muscle mass. If you have lost weight after an HIV-related infection, a dietitian may recommend increasing your calorie and protein intake to try to regain it.


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Prescription weight - loss drugs : Can they help you


Drug treatments for obesity: Orlistat, sibutramine and remonabant. Xenical (prescribing information). Belviq (prescribing information). FDA approves weight-management drug Qsymia. Qsymia (prescribing information). FDA approves Qsymia, a weight-loss drug. Didrex (prescribing information). Suprenza (prescribing information). Tenuate (prescribing information). Bontril (prescribing information). Contrave (prescribing information). FDA approves weight-management drug Contrave. FDA approves weight-management drug Saxenda. Saxenda (prescribing information).


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