What is the most recommended weight loss surgery


Weight loss treatments - Evidence


You are most likely to be successful in losing weight and keeping it off when you believe that your body weight can be controlled. This article discusses how to get started with a weight loss plan, including changes in your behavior, what you eat, and weight loss medications. (See "Patient information: Weight loss surgery and procedures (Beyond the Basics)" .) The BMI is calculated from your height and weight ( calculator 1 and calculator 2 ). Eating — You can change your eating habits by breaking the chain of events between the trigger for eating and eating itself. — You can estimate the number of calories you need per day based upon your current (or target) weight, gender, and activity level for women and for men [ 4 ]. Any diet will help you to lose weight if you stick with the diet. Weight loss medicines may be recommended for people who have not been able to lose weight with diet and exercise who have a: If you do not lose at least 5 percent of your initial body weight within 12 weeks, the medicine should be stopped. Liraglutide — Liraglutide at 3.0 mg/day is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for weight loss. ●Chitosan and wheat dextrin are ineffective for weight loss and their use is not recommended. Bariatric (stomach) procedures for weight loss are discussed separately (see "Patient information: Weight loss surgery and procedures (Beyond the Basics)" ).


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Top 5 Best Weight Loss Surgery Procedures


Recently, the website listed its five most promising weight loss procedures in the fight against obesity. This is the only procedure that is surgery free. Sleeve Gastrectomy, TOGA, POSE, and Gastric Plication Surgery are all new surgery procedures for those seeking options for weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (or gastric sleeve) is a relatively new and promising surgery in which the stomach is reduced in size. As a result of the partial resection of the stomach, gastric sleeve almost eliminates the production of ghrelin, the hunger hormone that is produced by cells in the stomach wall. In the past, gastric sleeve was performed as part of the more complicated “sleeve gastrectomy with duodenal switch”, a procedure that apart from reducing the size of the stomach it also dramatically restricted the ability of the intestines to absorb the ingested food. Although there has been much success with sleeve gastrectomy procedure in the short term, the long term success rate has yet to be decided. Reducing the size of the stomach reduces the amount of food a person can take in, and makes the patient feel fuller much faster. The advantage of TOGA over other weight loss surgery procedures is that it is less invasive. The newest weight loss option is the POSE (Primary Obesity Surgery, Endolumenal) which reduces the size of the stomach pouch of a patient that has undergone gastric bypass surgery. POSE aims at reducing the size of the dilated pouch, thus restricting the amount of food that can be ingested. The procedure is meant to decrease the size of the stomach, as well as the amount of food it can take in, resulting in weight loss. Gastric Plication Surgery (GPS) is a lot like the vertical sleeve gastrectomy, but does not use staples or reduction of the stomach via resective operations. It does this by stitching the stomach together after it is folded on itself. As of now, this is the cheapest surgical weight loss procedure available.


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Laparoscopic gastric banding : MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia


Your surgeon may not be able to reach the access port to tighten or loosen the band (you would need minor surgery to fix this problem) If this happens the band cannot be tightened (you would need minor surgery to fix this problem) Your surgeon will ask you to have tests and visits with your other health care providers before you have this surgery. You must be able to make major changes in your lifestyle after surgery. During the week before your surgery: Ask which drugs to take on the day of your surgery. On the day of your surgery: DO NOT eat or drink anything after midnight the night before your surgery. Your provider will tell you when to arrive at the hospital. You will probably go home the day of surgery. Your surgeon can make the band tighter or looser any time after you have this surgery.


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Surgery for Weight Loss : What Are the Options


Does Insurance Pay for Weight Loss Surgery? If weight loss surgery is covered by the insurance policy. If a coinsurance or deductible payment for the weight loss surgery is required by the patient. Types of Weight Loss Surgery. The three most common types of weight loss surgery are the Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, the Adjustable Gastric Band, and the Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy. Gastric bypass surgery will require one to two days stay in the hospital. The port is implanted in the skin during the surgery and is attached to the gastric band. Adjustable gastric band surgery is a reversible procedure, and is considered the least invasive of all of the weight loss surgeries. Patients who are compliant with instructions on diet can usually lose between 30 and 40 percent of excess weight with the gastric band procedure. Weight loss is slower with gastric band surgery and it may take up to five years for complete weight loss. Complications with adjustable gastric band surgery may include band slippage, band erosion into the stomach, and port-related problems, such as bleeding or infection. In vertical sleeve gastrectomy, at least 85 percent of the stomach is removed during surgery. Dieticians specialized in meal planning for bariatric surgery patients will consult with patients after surgery and throughout the weight loss period. Risks Associated with Weight Loss Surgery. Weight loss surgical procedures require major surgery and may be associated with significant risks.


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Is Weight Loss Surgery for You


You may be a candidate for weight loss surgery if: You're ready to adjust how you eat after the surgery. When you get weight loss surgery , your surgeon makes changes to your stomach or small intestine, or both. The food you eat bypasses the rest of the stomach, going straight from the pouch to your small intestine. The band limits how much food can go into your stomach. Gastric Sleeve : This surgery removes most of the stomach and leaves only a narrow section of the upper part of the stomach, called a gastric sleeve . The surgery may also curb the hunger hormone ghrelin, so you eat less. Duodenal Switch: This is complicated surgery that removes most of the stomach and uses a gastric sleeve to bypass most of your small intestine.


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Weight Loss Surgery - Louisiana Weight Loss Surgery


Weight Loss Surgery. Weight Loss Surgery Bellanger 2016-01-21 T 21:37:57+00:00. Bellanger , and is the procedure most often recommended for patients. A vertical sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is a partial gastrectomy that involves resection of the majority of the body, fundus and antrum of the stomach. It is sometimes referred to as a Vertical Sleeve gastrectomy, or simply “The Sleeve”. It induces weight loss by reducing the capacity of the stomach, which restricts the amount of food that can be consumed. The Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass surgery is the oldest weight loss operation in the U. The gastric bypass is both a restrictive and malabsorptive operation for weight loss. The gastric (stomach) balloon fills the treatment gap between traditional diet programs and medications, and that of weight loss surgery. By Tracy Buxton “Your weight loss process should not be defined by the numbers”. After all, weight loss IS all about the numbers, the number on the [.] By: Drake Bellanger, MD As a weight loss operation, I feel at this point, the Sleeve Gastrectomy combines safety and effectiveness better than any previous operation used for weight loss.


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Am I A Candidate for Weight Loss Surgery / USC Weight Loss


Understanding the risks of bariatric surgery. What are the complications and risks associated with bariatric surgery? What are the routine tests before bariatric surgery? What impact do my medical conditions have on the decision for bariatric surgery, and how can my medical problems affect risk? What is type 2 diabetes and how is it affected by bariatric surgery? What is high cholesterol and how is it affected by bariatric surgery? What is sleep apnea and how is it affected by bariatric surgery? What is depression and how is it affected by bariatric surgery? What is osteoarthritis and how is it affected by bariatric surgery? What is reproductive health and how is it affected by bariatric surgery? What is the cost of bariatric surgery? What is the long-term success of bariatric surgery? What are the long-term benefits of bariatric surgery?


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Review Bariatric Surgeons in Mexico - Mexico Weight Loss


Louisiana Valenzuela is a top weight-loss surgeon practicing in Tijuana. Corvala is a well- experienced surgeon that graduated with a medical degree from La Salle University in Mexico City. Ismael Cabrera is an experienced bariatric surgeon. Cabrera graduated from the University UPAEP. Jaime Ponce de Leon is a weight loss surgeon with over a decade of bariatric experience, and over twenty years of surgery experience. Mario Camelo is a weight loss surgeon who has preformed over 1,000 bariatric surgeries to date. Kelly graduated from the Universidad AutĂłnoma de Guadalajara. Kuri has done thousands of Lap-Band surgeries and graduated from the National University of Mexico School of Medicine. Jose Rodriguez flies into Tijuana from Juarez to do surgeries at INT Hospital. Rodriguez graduated from the University of Nuevo Leon. Salvador Ramirez is a weight loss surgeon who is the assistant to Dr. Miguel Rojas is a Tijuana weight loss surgeon working out of the MAR Surgery Center (a surgery center, not a full-service hospital). Rojas graduated from the University of Nuevo Leon and a professor. Jalil Illan Fraijo is a Tijuana weight loss surgeon who was the assistant of Dr.


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Weight loss : Strategies for success - Mayo Clinic


Make your weight-loss goals a reality. For successful, long-term weight loss, you must make permanent changes in your lifestyle and health habits. How do you make those permanent changes? Make sure that you're ready to make permanent changes and that you do so for the right reasons. To stay committed to your weight loss, you need to be focused. Then, once you're ready to launch your weight-loss plan, set a start date and then — start. No one else can make you lose weight. You must undertake diet and exercise changes to please yourself. What's going to give you the burning drive to stick to your weight-loss plan? While you have to take responsibility for your own behavior for successful weight loss, it helps to have support — of the right kind. If you prefer to keep your weight-loss plans private, be accountable to yourself by having regular weigh-ins and recording your diet and exercise progress in a journal. It isn't essential that you have an outcome goal, but you should set process goals because changing your your habits is a key to weight loss.


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Weight loss surgery - NHS Choices


Weight loss surgery  Read more about who can have weight loss surgery . Availability of weight loss surgery. Weight loss surgery is also available privately. Types of weight loss surgery. The three most widely used types of weight loss surgery are: Read more about  how weight loss surgery is performed . Life after weight loss surgery. Read more about  life after weight loss surgery . As with all types of surgery, weight loss surgery carries the risk of complications, some of which are serious and potentially fatal, such as: Read more about the  risks of weight loss surgery . Read more about the results of weight loss surgery .


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Right weight loss surgery - Obesity Action Coalition


It is my opinion that EACH of the most common weight-loss operations done today (gastric bypass, adjustable gastric banding and sleeve gastrectomy) are effective when: In general, gastric bypass patients will lose around 70 percent of their excess weight, sleeve gastrectomy patients will lose around 60 percent, and gastric banding patients will lose around 50 percent. Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy patients almost always achieve the expected weight-loss outlined above. This will occur if they do not make the necessary lifestyle changes in the first year after their weight-loss operation. You see, with a band, if patients are not following-up and working on lifestyle change IMMEDIATELY, they just will not lose weight. The good news is that when a gastric banding patient loses weight, they almost always keep it off because they had to make lifestyle changes to take off the weight and that is what keeps it off for ANY weight-loss operation. Gastric bypass and sleeve patients will typically lose five to seven pounds a week early on and will reach their expected weight-loss 12-15 months after their operation. Some patients say, “I am having this operation to lose weight and I want it off NOW!” That is more of a gastric bypass/sleeve type of weight-loss. In the first year after surgery, gastric banding patients are typically seen more frequently than gastric bypass or sleeve patients, so it is important that a gastric banding patient be able to make these follow-up appointments in order to achieve maximum weight-loss. Some patients like the idea of knowing that if they “cheat” on their operation the operation will punish them for it. Gastric band patients need to be VERY comfortable with having the band in you for the rest of your life. If a band is removed or a bypass is reversed, a patient almost always begins regaining weight as they no longer have the “tool” that controlled their hunger and portion size. While it is true that a gastric bypass and a sleeve gastrectomy are bigger operations, when we look at the complication rates of all three operations, they are the same: 10-15 percent of patients will experience a complication related to their operation at some point. If a gastric band patient, a sleeve patient and a gastric bypass patient all lose 150 lbs, they will ALL have some degree of loose skin. Ultimately it comes down to you knowing you, and I am convinced that patients are the best decision makers on which operation is right for them.


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Shelton, CT Gastric Bypass Surgery


Gastric Bypass Surgery in Shelton, CT. Gastric bypass surgery, also known as Roux-en-Y Gastric bypass, is the most commonly performed weight loss surgery used to treat obesity in Shelton, Connecticut. Gastric Bypass Results in Shelton, CT. Most gastric bypass patients lose approximately 60-80 percent of their excess body weight within the first 2 years after their surgery. Although most of this weight loss will occur within the first 6 months, gastric bypass surgery is highly recommended for long term weight loss. With the proper diet and lifestyle changes, patient can demonstrate continual weight loss over 10 years following surgery. Patients who undergo obesity treatments in Shelton such as gastric bypass surgery should be aware of some potential concerns: Gastric Bypass Cost at Our Shelton Center. Shelton, CT Gastric Bypass Surgeons.


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Protein Shakes! - Personal Nutrition Guide


That's where and why protein shakes/protein powders come in to the picture. I use the terms protein powder and protein shake interchangeably. Q: What's The Difference Between Protein Shakes? The Kinds of Protein. The source of protein in your shake can be derived from a variety of foods. The most popular shakes are made from whey protein concentrate, whey protein isolate, soy protein or even some combination of whey and soy. You'll get the most protein for the least calories from whey, egg, and soy. Then read the label for the number of grams of protein per serving. How much daily protein you need varies but generally is in the 60-80g/day range. Summary: The Best Protein Shakes/Protein Powders Have: Are made from a protein source you like the taste of and can tolerate (most likely whey, soy, or egg).


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Story Of Obesity Surgery - American Society for Metabolic


The gastric bypass (open and laparoscopic), the laparoscopic adjustable band and the biliopancreatic diversion (with or without the duodenal switch) are the primary procedures used currently. The remaining stomach and first segment of small intestine are bypassed. Wittgrove and Clark reported the first case series of laparoscopic RYGBP. The primary differences between laparoscopic and open RYGBP are the method of access and method of exposure. Clinical studies have demonstrated that laparoscopic RYGBP is a safe and effective alternative to open RYGBP for the treatment of morbid obesity. Higa and colleagues reported the largest laparoscopic RYGBP experience with 1,500 operations. The advantages and disadvantages of laparoscopic RYGBP are listed below. The m alabsorptive operations differ from the RYGBP and the gastric banding, which work mainly through restriction. Increased amount of food intake compared to the bypass and band. Both the BPD and the DS can be performed laparoscopically. Excess weight loss with the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band is lower than that with the gastric bypass or malabsorptive procedures, varying between 28% and 65% at 2 years and 54% at 5 years. The decline and fall of jejunoileal bypass. The gastric bypass operation reduces the progression and mortality of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.


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Bariatric Surgery Procedures


Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by restricting the amount of food the stomach can hold, causing malabsorption of nutrients, or by a combination of both gastric restriction and malabsorption. The most common bariatric surgery procedures are gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy, adjustable gastric band, and biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. Restricts the amount of food that can be consumed. First, the new stomach pouch holds a considerably smaller volume than the normal stomach and helps to significantly reduce the amount of food (and thus calories) that can be consumed. Short term studies show that the sleeve is as effective as the roux-en-Y gastric bypass in terms of weight loss and improvement or remission of diabetes. Induces rapid and significant weight loss that comparative studies find similar to that of the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Weight loss of > 50% for 3-5+ year data, and weight loss comparable to that of the bypass with maintenance of > 50% Requires no foreign objects (AGB), and no bypass or re-routing of the food stream (RYGB) The Adjustable Gastric Band – often called the band – involves an inflatable band that is placed around the upper portion of the stomach, creating a small stomach pouch above the band, and the rest of the stomach below the band. The common explanation of how this device works is that with the smaller stomach pouch, eating just a small amount of food will satisfy hunger and promote the feeling of fullness.


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Bariatric Weight Loss Surgery in Mexico


Weight Loss Bariatric Surgeons. We understand the weight loss surgery patient, as our staff is made up of weight loss surgery patients. Our lead surgeons are dedicated bariatric surgeons and have in some way been recognized for their contribution to weight loss and/or minimally invasive surgery. Mariano Covarrubias and his surgical team to the ALM family of weight loss surgeons. Covarrubias is one of the most experienced surgeons in Mexico and has served as Professor of Laparoscopic Surgery At the Regional General Hospital IMSS Tijuana. The ALM Constant Care Bariatric Program helps patients start their weight loss journey in Mexico and fully supports them through the important first year after surgery. The goal of this program is to break down the barriers patients face when considering bariatric surgery and lead patients through a successful weight loss journey. Mexico Weight Loss Surgery in Tijuana. Weight Loss Surgery Costs. The costs of weight loss surgery can be quite expensive and intimidating. Cost of Weight Loss Surgery for obesity, such as Gastric Bypass Surgery, is high - and sometimes not covered by insurance. The average costs of weight loss surgery procedures can be tens of thousands of dollars ($20,000-$35,000). With top, and well-respected surgeons in Mexico, now is the time to request more information about weight loss surgery in Mexico.


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What vitamins, supplements should I take after weight


What vitamins and supplements are recommended for people who have had weight loss surgery? John Rabkin , any type of weight-loss surgery will initially require some supplementation due to the restricted amount of food you can eat post-operatively. When you eat less food, you also take in less vitamins, minerals, and protein, leading to the need for short- and/or long-term supplementation. Rabkin goes on to explain that many procedures including gastric bypass, duodenal switch, and biliopancreatic diversion require supplementation of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, & K) and minerals (calcium, iron, zinc, occ. Gastric banding and sleeve procedures do not remove areas in the gut where nutrient absorption takes place, so they often require less supplementation long term and have less risk of deficiencies. The doses of vitamins, minerals and protein vary considerably between individuals, so it is important that you work closely with your weight-loss surgeon and primary care physician after the surgery to determine the right amount for you. These surgeries are not a quick fix and do have side effects, so it is critical to find a weight-loss surgeon who provides long-term care.


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Gastric Sleeve Surgery - Obesity Weight Loss Surgery


Gastric sleeve surgery, or vertical sleeve gastrectomy, is one of the newer types of bariatric surgery. How Gastric Sleeve Surgery Works. Who Is a Good Candidate for Gastric Sleeve Surgery? What to Do Before Gastric Sleeve Surgery. What to Expect After Gastric Sleeve Surgery. Gastric Sleeve Surgery Risks and Complications. There are several risks and complications of gastric sleeve surgery: (Read more about the risks of gastric sleeve surgery .) Take-Home Points on Gastric Sleeve Surgery. Cost of Gastric Sleeve Surgery. The cost of gastric sleeve surgery can exceed $10,000. (Read more about the cost of gastric sleeve surgery .)


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Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity


Bariatric Surgery for Severe Obesity. Currently, bariatric surgery may be an option for adults with severe obesity. Well informed about the surgery and treatment effects? Aware of the risks and benefits of surgery? Aware of how life may change after the surgery? Some patients who have bariatric surgery may have weight loss that does not meet their goals. The amount of weight regain may vary by extent of obesity and type of surgery. Problems that may occur with the surgery, like a stretched pouch or separated stitches, may also affect the amount of weight loss. Bariatric Surgery for Youth  Although it is becoming clear that teens can lose weight after bariatric surgery, many questions still exist about the long-term effects on teens' developing bodies and minds. Experts in childhood obesity and bariatric surgery suggest that families consider surgery only after youth have tried for at least 6 months to lose weight and have not had success.1 Candidates should meet the following criteria:  Mounting evidence suggests that bariatric surgery can favorably change both the weight and health of youth with extreme obesity. The type of surgery that may help an adult or youth depends on a number of factors. What is the difference between open and laparoscopic surgery? VSG surgery restricts food intake and decreases the amount of food used.


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Types of Weight Loss Surgery


Considering weight loss surgery ? Weight loss surgery is not for everyone. Types of Weight Loss Surgeries. Existing surgeries help with weight loss in different ways. Restrictive surgeries work by shrinking the size of the stomach and slowing down digestion. The smaller the stomach, the less you can eat. The less you eat, the more weight you lose. Implanting an electrical device, the newest of the three techniques, prompts weight loss by interrupting nerve signals between the stomach and the brain . What it is: Gastric banding is a type of restrictive weight loss surgery.


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The 10 Most Common Mistakes Weight Loss Surgery


The 10 Most Common Mistakes Weight Loss Surgery Patients Make. The National Association for Weight Loss Surgery (NAWLS) helps WLS patients shape new lives. Every WLS patient has specific nutritional needs depending on the type of surgery you have had. 2nd Mistake:  Assuming You Have Been Cured of Your Obesity. When you are feeling better than you have in years, and the weight is coming off easily, it's hard to imagine you will ever struggle again. If you drink while you eat, your food washes out of your stomach much more quickly, you can eat more, you get hungry sooner, and you are at more risk for snacking. Adequate water intake will also help you flush out your system as you lose weight and avoid kidney stones. Drinking enough water helps with your weight loss, too. It's one thing to eat the three to five small meals you and your doctor agree you need. Make a plan for what you will do when you crave food, but are not truly hungry. The more muscle you have, the more calories your body will burn, even at rest! What we know it does is keep you from getting the hydration your body requires after WLS-because when you're drinking soda, you're not drinking water! And it is in your best interest to understand the consequences of drinking alcohol before you do it. Depending on your type of WLS, you may get drunker, quicker after surgery, which can cause health problems and put you in dangerous situations.


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Bariatric surgery - Mayo Clinic


American Gastroenterological Association. American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement on obesity. Bariatric surgery for severe obesity. Surgical management of severe obesity. Complications of bariatric surgery. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery medical guidelines for clinical practice for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient. Obesity. Collazo-Clavell ML (expert opinion). Rochester, Minn. Sarr MG (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.


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Mexico Gastric sleeve surgery in Tijuana, best price


Gastric Sleeve Surgery, aka Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy, is the best surgical option for weight loss, and is the most recommended procedure by bariatric surgeons. One does not have to be morbidly obese, to benefit from the gastric sleeve surgery. Although there are other bariatric surgeries, such as gastric banding, gastric balloon, and gastric by-pass, the gastric sleeve surgery does have several advantages such as: • Should the required weight loss percentage not be achieved, the patient can undergo gastric bypass surgery. How the Gastric Sleeve Works. Because this surgery drastically reduces the volume of food that can enter the stomach at a time, the patient cannot eat very large amounts. The greatest advantage of gastric sleeve surgery, compared to dieting, is that with dieting, you are constantly fighting the urge to eat, because your ghrelin levels are high, the stomach is constantly sending hunger signals to the brain. But with the gastric sleeve surgery, you don’t feel out of control urges to eat, your metabolism doesn’t slow down, and you don’t feel weak and tired so easily. This was because the body was no longer producing the ghrelin hormones that enter into the blood stream and informs the brain that the body needs to eat. With gastric sleeve surgery, the patient will be able to lose weight permanently due to the reduction of the stomach’s capacity and less production of the ghrelin hormones that are directly responsible for increasing appetite.


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Long - term Management of Patients After Weight Loss Surgery


It is expected that patients are followed up by the bariatric team for a lifetime, as care is complicated and lifetime follow-up is the key to long-term success. Two common procedures performed for weight loss are the laparoscopic adjustable gastric band (LAGB) and the laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRGBY). 4 , 5 The main factors contributing to successful weight loss after bariatric surgery are the patient's ability to make lifestyle changes and to maintain those changes for years to come following the surgery. Many patients have difficulty with the extreme and instant lifestyle changes. The most common factors leading to weight gain after weight loss surgery are decreased exercise and a return to preoperative eating habits. 19 , 20 Patients can become discouraged or embarrassed and may not return to the bariatric provider who performed their surgery. Medications for all weight loss patients need to be in crushed, liquid, or chewable forms during the first 6 months for LRGBY and for the patient's lifetime after LAGB. The main goals after any bariatric gastric surgery are threefold: (1) to maximize weight loss and absorption of nutrients, (2) to maintain adequate hydration, and (3) to avoid vomiting and dumping syndrome. Unfortunately, most patients will be unable to attain ideal body weight, so the goal is to maintain 70% EBW loss for LRGBY and 50% for LAGB. Obstruction occurs in 2% of patients and manifests the same symptoms as slippage and gastric pouch dilation. For most patients, the benefits greatly outweigh the risks, and they are likely to have better and longer lives after surgery.


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Obesity


Medications should be considered helpful adjuncts to diet and exercise for patients whose health risk from obesity clearly outweigh the potential side effects of the medications. Medications should be prescribed by doctors familiar with the patients' conditions and with the use of the medications. What elements of a weight-loss program should a consumer look for in judging its potential for safe and successful weight loss? A responsible and safe weight-loss program should be able to document for you the five following features: Also, a physician should be able to advise you on the need for weight loss, the appropriateness of the weight-loss program, and a sensible goal of weight loss for you. Your program should include plans for weight maintenance after the weight-loss phase is over. The program you select should include help in permanently changing your dietary habits and level of physical activity, and to alter a lifestyle that may have contributed to weight gain in the past. Maintaining your ideal body weight is a balancing act between food consumption and calories needed by the body for energy. The kinds and amounts of food you eat affect your ability to maintain your ideal weight and to lose weight. Holmen; "Weight change and mortality: the Nord-Trondelag Health Study." Journal of Internal Medicine.


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Weight control and diet - University of Maryland Medical


You can check your BMI at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BMI calculator . Extra weight around the mid-section or stomach area increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The risk of heart disease rises sharply for women with ratios above 0.8 and for men with ratios above 1.0. They may blame themselves for not having the will power to keep the weight off, and many regain more than they lost. The foods we eat when we are children may influence our food likes and dislikes for life. Some argue, in fact, that unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle cause the harm - not the extra weight itself - in people who are not severely obese. Most people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and weight loss may be the key to controlling the current epidemic of type 2 diabetes. More weight puts pressure on the bones and joints. The following are some suggestions and observations on exercise and weight loss: Such products may increase the risk for thyroid disorders, heart attack, and stroke. The need for vitamin and mineral supplementation. Exercise and the support of others (for example, joining a support group with people who have undergone weight-loss surgery) are extremely important in achieving and maintaining weight loss after bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity: a meta-analysis of weight loss outcomes for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and laparoscopic gastric bypass.


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The Most Popular Weight Loss Surgery


These include gastric bypass , gastric banding , and gastric sleeve (sleeve gastrectomy) procedures, among others. Over the past year or so, the popularity of the gastric sleeve procedure (also known as sleeve gastrectomy) has skyrocketed, due to its effectiveness and safety as compared with other procedures. In fact, according to Bariatric Surgery Source , the gastric sleeve procedure now appears to be overtaking gastric bypass as the new “gold standard” procedure. Sleeve gastrectomy, or gastric sleeve, is a surgical procedure that reduces food intake and induces weight loss. For these reasons, the gastric sleeve procedure is known as a “restrictive” type of bariatric surgery. According to the latest  obesity guidelines  released by the  American Heart Association (AHA) , the  American College of Cardiology (ACC) , and  The Obesity Society (TOS) , bariatric surgery may be an option for adult patients who meet certain criteria. The obesity guideline writing committee did not find sufficient evidence to recommend bariatric surgery for patients who have BMIs that fall below these cutpoints. The guideline further advises primary care doctors and others caring for patients with obesity with high BMI to try “behavioral treatment with or without pharmacotherapy” first, and then if this has not worked along with other diet and lifestyle measures to achieve sufficient weight loss, bariatric surgery may be considered. Also important to consider is that sleeve gastrectomy may not be the best choice for patients with significant gastroesophageal reflux disease . How Effective Is the Gastric Sleeve Procedure? As with most bariatric surgery procedures, patients will need to be followed closely for the rest of their lives to monitor for vitamin and mineral deficiencies. The current state of the evidence for bariatric surgery.


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Revision for Weight Loss Surgery - Massachusetts General


Revision for Weight Loss Surgery. Revisional weight loss surgery is performed by bariatric surgeons at the Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center to redo or convert a prior weight loss procedure. Patients may undergo reversal of the original weight loss procedure. Revisional surgery also may be required to reverse a weight loss procedure for one or more of the following complications: The revisional surgery performed will depend on the prior surgical procedure and the complication that is being treated. The JIB is one of the original forms of weight loss surgery. The type of revisional surgery recommended after gastric bypass will depend on the patient’s complications. The revision rate for BPD is about 2% to 10% depending on the specific procedure. What Preparation is Required Before Revision for Weight Loss Surgery? At the Mass General Weight Center, you will undergo consultation by a surgeon experienced in minimally invasive revisional surgery. As part of the Mass General Digestive Healthcare Center, the Mass General Weight Center is unique for its expert, multidisciplinary approach to revisional surgery. Mass General Weight Center surgeons collectively have the most experience with revisional surgery of any group in the Boston area.


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Nutritional Deficiencies in Obesity and After Bariatric


Nutritional Deficiencies in Obesity and After Bariatric Surgery. The presence of nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obesity may seem paradoxical in light of excess caloric intake, but several micronutrient deficiencies appear to higher in prevalence in overweight and obese adults and children. As the obesity epidemic continues unabated and the popularity of bariatric surgery rises for both severely obese adults and adolescents, medical practitioners must be aware of pre-existing nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obese patients and appropriately recognize and treat both common and rare nutritional deficiencies that may arise or worsen following bariatric surgery. As the obesity epidemic continues unabated and the popularity of bariatric surgery rises for both extremely obese adults and adolescents, clinicians must be aware of pre-existing nutritional deficiencies in overweight and obese patients. To optimize long-term health after bariatric surgery, it is important to screen for and recognize symptoms of deficiency, prescribe appropriate supplementation and treat common and rare nutritional deficiencies that may emerge both in the short term and long-term post-operatively. Though not as common as in adults, the incidence of bariatric surgery has also increased dramatically in adolescents with severe obesity, rising 5-fold between 1997 and 2003.[ 2 ] Therefore, pediatric practitioners may well encounter the post-operative bariatric patient in their practice and must be able to screen for and treat predictable nutritional deficiencies. The adolescent bariatric patient may be particularly at risk for non-adherence to recommended supplementation and requires close follow-up, given the longer anticipated life-span with altered digestive physiology.[ 3 ] This article will summarize our current knowledge of nutritional deficiencies in obese and overweight individuals, with a particular focus on those that commonly occur after bariatric surgery. The rising rate of bariatric surgeries in extremely obese adults and adolescents also plays a role in increasing the risk of nutritional deficiencies associated with overweight and obese individuals.[ 2 , 10 ] The presence of nutritional deficiencies of selected micronutrients and macronutrients after bariatric surgery has been recognized for decades, but varies widely in prevalence and severity depending on type of bariatric surgery (see Figure 1 ). Procedures that bypass a portion of the small intestine, including JIB, BPD, BPD-DS, and RYGB carry the greatest risk of nutritional deficiencies. Recommended Nutritional Screening and Supplementation After Bariatric Surgery.


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About Weight Loss Surgery


About Weight Loss Surgery. Gastrointestinal surgery for obesity, also called weight loss surgery or bariatric surgery, alters the digestive process so as to achieve rapid weight loss. Restrictive weight loss surgeries limit food intake by creating a narrow passage from the upper part of the stomach into the larger lower part, reducing the amount of food the stomach can hold and slowing the passage of food through the stomach. Malabsorptive weight loss surgeries do not limit food intake, but instead exclude most of the small intestine from the digestive tract so fewer calories and nutrients are absorbed.  Benefits of Weight Loss Surgery. High Blood Pressure can often be alleviated or eliminated by weight loss surgery. There is no hard and fast statistical data to definitively prove that weight loss surgery reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, however, common sense would dictate that if we can significantly reduce many of the co-morbidities that we experienced as someone that is obese, we can likewise that our health may be much improved if not totally restored. Gallbladder Disease can be surgically handled at the time of the weight loss surgery if your doctor has cause to believe that gallstones are present. Weight loss surgery is a highly personal decision; it is also a medical decision. Next:  Am I A Candidate for Weight Loss Surgery > >


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Plastic Surgery After Dramatic Weight Loss


Your surgeon will then suggest the procedures that will help you reach your goals and give you a realistic picture of what those procedures can do for you. Your plastic surgeon will suggest appropriate options for you based on how much excess fat and skin you have, your skin quality, the areas to be treated and your preferences. In this procedure, your surgeon lifts up the thigh skin and tissue to tighten this area. Confirm that you have the right surgeon for your procedure. If your body surgery is performed on an outpatient basis, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you to and from surgery and to stay with you for at least the first night following surgery. Your surgeon will give you an estimate of how long your surgery will last based on the procedures you will undergo. Your plastic surgeon will follow the surgical plan discussed with you before surgery. Your surgical dressings will depend on the procedures you undergo and may include surgical drains. You will also have some swelling after the surgery. Arrange for someone to help you get around the house and help with your medication for at least the first 24 hours after surgery. You can help minimize certain risks by following the advice and instructions of your board-certified plastic surgeon, both before and after your post-bariatric surgery.


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Caring for Patients After Bariatric Surgery


Caring for Patients After Bariatric Surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to sustainable long-term weight loss and may be curative for such obesity-related comorbidities as diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea in severely obese patients. The Rouxen-Y gastric bypass has become the most common procedure for patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Some of the common short-term complications of bariatric surgery are wound infection, stomal stenosis, marginal ulceration, and constipation. 3 A number of studies 4 – 6 have demonstrated that bariatric surgery leads to sustainable long-term weight loss and, in many patients, may be curative for obesity-related comorbidities such as diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. As more patients have bariatric surgery, it is important for the family physician to be knowledgeable about the risks and benefits of the procedure and to understand the complexities of the lifelong medical surveillance that these patients require. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has become the most commonly performed procedure for patients undergoing bariatric surgery. 8   Potential candidates for bariatric surgery should be selected carefully based on the criteria in Table 2 8 and only after a thorough multidisciplinary evaluation. The International Bariatric Surgery Registry was founded in 1986 and provides data on 35,000 patients. Some common short-term complications of bariatric surgery are wound infections, stomal stenosis (i.e., narrowing of the gastrojejunostomy), marginal ulceration, and constipation. Lifestyle, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors 10 years after bariatric surgery. Analysis of the incidence and risk factors for wound infections in open bariatric surgery. Characterizing the performance and outcomes of obesity surgery in California.


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Obesity Treatment


Among the morbidly obese, less than 5 percent succeed in losing a significant amount of weight and maintaining the weight loss with non-surgical programs — usually a combination of dieting, behavior modification therapy and exercise. Many of us have tried a variety of diets and have been caught in a cycle of weight gain and loss — "yo-yo" dieting — that can cause serious health risks by stressing the heart, kidneys and other organs. The goal of behavior modification therapy is to change your eating and exercise habits to promote weight loss. Setting realistic weight loss goals — short term and long term. Recording your diet and exercise patterns in a diary. Adopting realistic beliefs about weight loss and body image. Although some people experience success with behavior modification, most patients achieve only short-term weight loss for the first year. If you plan on having weight-loss surgery, behavior therapy and dieting will be instrumental in helping you maintain your weight loss after surgery. Diet and behavior modification will determine your ultimate success. Exercise greatly increases your chance of long-term weight loss. Research shows that when you reduce the number of calories you consume, your body reacts by slowing your metabolism to burn fewer calories, rather than promote weight loss. Daily physical activity can help speed up your metabolism, effectively reducing the "set point" — a sort of thermostat in the brain that makes you resistant to either weight gain or loss — to a lower natural weight. The following strategies can help you start exercising and can be incorporated into your daily routine.


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Weight Loss Surgery


People also need to be healthy enough to get the surgery. Unlike gastric bypass, a gastric sleeve operation only changes the stomach. Like the other kinds of surgery, gastric banding makes the stomach smaller. Gastric bypass surgery can help people lose the most weight right away. People might not get the nutrition they need after bypass surgery. The gastric sleeve surgery is a simpler operation: Unlike gastric bypass surgery, gastric sleeve surgery only affects the stomach. Gastric banding is the only surgery that's not permanent: Gastric banding is the simplest of the three weight loss surgeries. Food can move too fast through the stomach and intestines after weight loss surgery (especially gastric bypass). People who have had weight loss surgery might not get all the nutrition they need. People also can have emotional side effects after weight loss surgery: But for people who face serious weight-related medical problems and who are willing to put the effort into a new way of life, weight loss surgery can be worth it.


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2012 Bariatric Surgery Excellence Award Announcement


Choosing Bariatric Surgery and the Promise of Improved Health. Historically, bariatric surgery was considered the last leg of a weight-loss journey after diet, exercise, and other medically supervised programs have failed. However, weight-loss surgery has now gained increased consideration by the medical community as an effective and enduring option for weight loss in select individuals. Bariatric surgery can restore a person’s dignity, independence, and, most importantly, their health and survival. And it is this critical difference that appears to make bariatric surgery ideal for people with obesity-related health problems, such as high blood sugar, high cholesterol, and other critical metabolic irregularities. Do the surgeon and hospital have the unique qualifications required to perform bariatric surgery, and a track record of success based on volume and performance? For the last seven years, Healthgrades has performed an exhaustive review of bariatric surgery in American hospitals. What was uncovered in the Healthgrades 2012 Bariatric Surgery Trends in American Hospitals report is noteworthy. The quality and cost of bariatric programs varies significantly from hospital to hospital. People with a BMI of 35 are considered a candidate for weight-loss surgery if they also have heart disease, type 2 diabetes, severe sleep apnea, and other weight-related health problems, including the ability to move around, earn a living, or run a household. The morbidly obese (or those with a BMI of 40 or more) are candidates for weight-loss surgery regardless of their individual health problems, but may require some nonsurgical weight loss before undergoing bariatric surgery to be eligible for certain surgical programs. What People Considering Bariatric Surgery Need to Decide. People eligible for weight-loss surgery should consider which hospital and surgeon they should entrust, the most appropriate procedure, and the costs involved.


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Weight Loss Surgery Options - Gastric Banding, Sleeve


There are three primary restrictive procedures: laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass , laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy and laparoscopic adjustable Gastric Banding . What are the Pros/Cons of Gastric Bypass , Sleeve Gastrectomy and Adjustable Banding ? The surgery lasts around two hours and usually requires two nights in the hospital. The weight loss after surgery occurs over one to two years. The vitamins recommended for a bypass patient are: multi-vitamin, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin B and iron. The surgery lasts around 60-90 minutes and requires one night in the hospital. The weight loss occurs after one to two years. Similar to the bypass, there is a risk of leaking and bleeding at the staple lines. The weight loss after Banding occurs over two to three years. Bypass and Sleeve result in faster weight loss, but there are more risks with the surgery itself.


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Weight - loss surgery 'highly effective' for type 2 diabetes


A new study suggests weight-loss surgery combined with low-level lifestyle interventions may be a more effective treatment strategy for obese patients with type 2 diabetes than lifestyle interventions alone. While lifestyle interventions alone appear to have no effect on type 2 diabetes remission, researchers found these combined with weight-loss surgery led to remission for many obese patients with the condition. But recently, studies have suggested weight-loss surgery, or bariatric surgery, may be just as effective as lifestyle interventions and medical therapy for obese patients with type 2 diabetes. In April 2014, for example, Medical News Today reported on a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine that found obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were able to control their type 2 diabetes without the use of medical therapy in the 3 years following the procedure. As such, the team assessed the outcomes of 61 obese patients aged 25-55 with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to receive either weight-loss surgery in the first year followed by a low-level lifestyle intervention for 2 years, or an intense lifestyle intervention for 1 year followed by a low-level lifestyle intervention for 2 years. Weight-loss surgery led to complete type 2 diabetes remission for some obese patients. The team found that many participants who underwent weight-loss surgery followed by lifestyle interventions experienced partial or complete type 2 diabetes remission, while those who engaged in lifestyle interventions alone experienced no remission at all. Of the subjects who underwent RYGB, 40% experienced partial or complete type 2 diabetes remission, while this was the case for 29% of subjects who underwent LAGB. In addition, the team found that patients who underwent weight-loss surgery were more likely to have better blood glucose control and less likely to need medication for their type 2 diabetes, compared with those who engaged in lifestyle interventions alone. Michel Gagner, of Florida International University in Miami, says the findings indicate the use of weight-loss surgery should be increased for obese individuals with type 2 diabetes. In November 2014, MNT reported on a study suggesting that weight-loss surgery may also be effective for prevention of type 2 diabetes among obese patients. Published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, the study found that obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were 80% less likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those who received no obesity-related treatment.


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