What is considered abnormal weight loss


Abnormal blood test symptoms and Weight loss


AND Pain (411 matches) AND Drowsiness (91 matches) AND Infection (90 matches) AND Eczema (87 matches) AND Tiredness (84 matches) AND Aches (82 matches) AND Cramps (69 matches) AND Paresthesias (59 matches) AND Belching (52 matches) AND Hematoma (50 matches) AND Dehydration (48 matches) AND Anxiety (47 matches) AND Angina (45 matches) AND Cough (41 matches) AND Malaise (40 matches)


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Unintentional Weight Loss : Causes, Symptoms and Treatments


Unintentional weight loss is when you lose weight without dieting or increasing physical activity. What Causes Unintentional Weight Loss? Unintentional weight loss is often the result of an underlying chronic medical condition. What Are the Symptoms of Unintentional Weight Loss? Certain medications can cause unintentional weight loss as a side effect. How Is Unintentional Weight Loss Diagnosed? Note when the weight loss started. Also, make a note of any other symptoms you experienced around the time of the weight loss. Unintentional weight loss is a symptom of several conditions. What Are the Treatment Options for Unintentional Weight Loss? Your doctor will likely prescribe medication if a hormonal disorder is causing the unintentional weight loss. If your doctor suspects that your unintentional weight loss may be due to a more serious illness, such as cancer, you may undergo some tests to get more information.


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Unintentional weight loss - NHS Choices


Unintentional weight loss  Significant weight loss can also be the result of an  eating disorder , such as anorexia  or bulimia . If your weight loss wasn't due to the above causes, and you didn't lose weight through dieting or exercising, see your GP, as you may have an illness that needs treating. The following information may give you a better idea of the cause of your weight loss, but don't use it to diagnose yourself. Other common causes of unexpected weight loss. Less common causes of unexpected weight loss. Less frequently, unexpected weight loss may be the result of:


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Effect of a dietary - induced weight loss on


Background: Weight loss was shown to be associated with improvements in liver enzymes and improvements of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Objective: The aim was to assess the outcome of liver enzymes after a low-calorie diet (LCD) as well as during a follow-up period and to identify predictors for potential changes in these liver enzymes. In men, a significant decrease in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) was observed immediately after the LCD, whereas, in women, these enzymes increased significantly, although mildly; however, this increase was transient. Therefore, many studies were conducted to examine the effect of weight loss on NAFLD and NASH. Improvements in liver enzymes during weight loss were shown by some ( 4 , 9 , 10 ) but not all ( 5 , 11 ) researchers to be positively correlated with improvements in the radiologic or histologic appearance of the liver. To the best of our knowledge, we are the first to address this question in a relatively large cohort of subjects with normal or near normal liver enzymes [alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST)] at baseline. Follow-up data at 32 and 60 wk after the end of the LCD were available for 67 subjects (47 women and 20 men) and 68 subjects (48 women and 20 men), respectively. The proportion of patients with normal liver histology increased after surgery, and the proportion of patients with steatosis decreased. However, the proportion of patients with steatohepatitis increased after surgery (14% before and 26% after surgery; P < 0.05). Andersen et al ( 5 ) studied the effects of weight loss induced by a very-LCD in 41 morbidly obese subjects (35 women and 6 men). The researchers observed a significant increase in portal inflammation (6 patients with portal inflammation before weight loss and 14 patients after weight loss; P = 0.039). However, it is unlikely that this occurred in our subjects, because the observed elevation of hepatic enzymes was transient, and no increase in GGT and ALP was noted. Finally, it may seem surprising that we found no correlation between age and changes in liver enzymes during the LCD. Moreover, we found no study that specifically examined correlations between age and changes in liver enzymes during weight loss.


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Normal Weight Loss Per Month


Normal Weight Loss Per Month. Promises from supplements or magazine articles that claim you can lose 20 or more pounds per month aren't promoting "normal" weight loss. As you start your weight loss journey, you'll learn what's "normal" for you, based on your activity level and lifestyle. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you aim for no more than a 3,500- to 7,000-calorie deficit a week to result in a "safe" and "sustainable" rate of loss of about 4 to 8 pounds a month. Factors Affecting "Normal" Weight Loss Per Month. Numerous factors affect how fast a normal rate of weight loss is for you. Instead, you might aim for a 2- to 3-pound weight loss a month, if that amount feels more normal - and doable - to you. If you begin a weight-loss program that consists of drastic changes, then you might find weight loss is faster in the first month and then trails off in subsequent months. Heavier people may also have a more rapid "normal" rate of weight loss. When you have more weight to lose, you need more calories daily to maintain your size. Of course, you want to be realistic in setting goals for weight loss, so it's helpful to know that 8 pounds is approximately the greatest amount of weight loss the average person could aim for in a month. If you cut your caloric intake and move more, you’ll lose weight and become healthier. Weight loss requires commitment and work; you have to find a normal rate for you that also doesn't burn you out.


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Weight gain - definition of Weight gain by Medical dictionary


The branch of medicine that deals with the study and treatment of obesity is known as bariatrics. The mechanism for excessive weight gain is clear—more calories are consumed than the body burns, and the excess calories are stored as fat (adipose) tissue. Bariatrics — The branch of medicine that deals with the prevention and treatment of obesity and related disorders. Hyperplastic obesity — Excessive weight gain in childhood, characterized by the creation of new fat cells. Obesity is a major public health problem and the leading nutritional disorder in the U. The National Institutes of Health have defined obesity as a BMI of 30 kg/m2 or more, and overweight as a BMI between 25 and 30 kg/m2. There is strong evidence that the prevalence of obesity is increasing in both children and adults. /obes·i·ty/ (o-bēs´ĭ-te) an increase in body weight beyond the limitation of skeletal and physical requirements, as the result of excessive accumulation of body fat.obese´, Morbid obesity  the condition of weighing two or more times the ideal weight; so called because it is associated with many serious and life-threatening disorders. Overweight is determined by a body mass index (BMI) of 25 to 29.9 kg/m2, and obesity is a BMI = 30 kg/m2. Morbidity and mortality are increased in the obese. Obesity and. N a type of obesity that typically develops in childhood and is characterized by the increased number of fat cells within the body. N a type of obesity characterized by the increase in number and enlarged size of the fat cells within the body. N a type of obesity characterized by the enlarged size of fat cells within the body.


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Involuntary Weight Loss - An Ignored Vital Sign in Seniors


Involuntary Weight Loss - An Ignored Vital Sign in Seniors. Estimates suggest 13.3% of the population experiences unintentional weight loss, and up to 7% experiences a loss exceeding 5% of baseline weight.1 Elders are disproportionately impacted; 27% of frail elders over the age of 65 experience involuntary weight loss.2. Most practitioners and researchers define unintentional weight loss as a 5% to 10% decrease in body weight over a period of 1 to 12 months.3-6 A clinically useful benchmark is 5% over a 6-month period. Cancer is the leading cause, accounting for 24% to 38% of cases (weight loss may be the only symptom of tumor burden).5 Dementia results in marked taste and smell alterations, decreasing food’s desirability. Medication side effects (anorexia, xerostomia, dysgeusia, dysosmia, dysphagia, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea) are major causes for weight loss among elders.8. Involuntary weight loss is a predictor of mortality. Normal Age-Related Weight Loss. Beginning around age 65 to 70, weight loss occurs at a rate of 0.1 to 0.2 kg/year as a result of changes in hormones regulating appetite and satiety, along with decreases in basal metabolic rates.6,8. When patients state their weight loss is the result of dieting, probe for lifestyle changes. Maintaining weight loss is difficult, and if the patient is keeping the pounds off easily, dieting may be a coincidental occurrence. Determine if weight loss is intentional. Depression and nonmalignant GI diseases are common reversible causes.8 Interventions used to reverse or minimize further weight loss include nonpharmacologic (Table 1) and pharmacologic (Table 2), the former being first-line. No drugs are approved by the FDA for involuntary weight loss. The epidemiology of recent involuntary weight loss in the United States population. An approach to the management of unintentional weight loss in elderly people.


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Weight Loss After 40 : A 10 - Step Plan to


Your own healthy habits in the past are the ones most likely to work for you now. If you suspect an underactive thyroid may be slowing your metabolism, the first step is to call the doctor and ask for a thyroid test. The takeaway: If your TSH result is above 2.5, make sure your doctor knows that the AACE considers you a candidate for thyroid medication, based on your symptoms. An added benefit of eating this way is that it's easier to keep your blood sugar steady, so you don't have the peaks and valleys that contribute to fatigue. There's one thing the exercise gurus have gotten right: The more muscle mass you have, the more effectively your metabolism burns calories. Add to that the fact that sleep-deprived people often crave "energy" foods, which tend to be sweet or salty, and you can see how small changes in your routine can add up to big weight gain. Add these all together and you can see a pattern emerging: The older we are, the harder it is to get a good night's sleep - and the less we sleep, the more likely it is we'll gain weight. Have you noticed that your weight tends to stay fairly constant week to week, even if one day you go on a junk food binge and the next day you're fairly good? Unfortunately, this means that when you've gradually gained weight over time, your body has adapted to the new weight and now does its best to hold onto it. And you - and only you - decide which end of the fuel-in, energy-out equation to emphasize and when. Remind yourself that you are the only one in charge of tuning up your metabolic engine.


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Weight loss - unintentional : MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia


You have lost more than 10 pounds OR 5% of your normal body weight over 6 to 12 months or less, and you do not know the reason. You have other symptoms along with the weight loss. How much weight have you lost? Are you eating less? Are you exercising more? Do you have more stress or anxiety than usual? Have you vomited? Have you had constipation or diarrhea? Do you have increased thirst or are you drinking more? Are you urinating more than usual? Have you lost any hair? Are you pleased or concerned with the weight loss?


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Unintentional Weight Gain : Causes, Symptoms and Diagnosis


What Is Unintentional Weight Gain? Unintentional weight gain can be periodic, continuous, or rapid. Continuous unintentional weight gain is often the result of pregnancy. Rapid unintentional weight gain may also be caused by medication side effects. What Causes Unintentional Weight Gain? The most common cause of unintentional weight gain is pregnancy. Periodic weight gain is often caused by the menstrual cycle. Symptoms of Unintentional Weight Gain. How Is Unintentional Weight Gain Diagnosed? How Is Unintentional Weight Gain Treated?


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Weight - Gain Shockers : Stress, Medications, and More in


What's With the Weight Gain? But what if you're doing everything the same as you always do, and your weight still goes up? Drugs That May Cause Weight Gain. Treating hypothyroidism with medication may reverse some of the weight gain. But where you gain weight may be related to menopause, with fat accumulating around your waist more than your hips and thighs. Weight gain is a common symptom of Cushing's syndrome, a condition in which you are exposed to too much of the stress hormone cortisol, which in turn causes weight gain and other abnormalities. The weight gain may be most prominent around the face, neck, upper back, or waist. Women with this condition are resistant to insulin (the hormone that controls blood sugar), so it may cause weight gain. When you quit, you may gain some weight, but perhaps less than you think. Rule 1: If You Do Gain Weight . Also, something else may be causing you to gain weight. Rule 2: If You Do Gain Weight . Rule 3: If You Do Gain Weight . Rule 4: If You Do Gain Weight . Rule 5: If You Do Gain Weight .


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Osteoporosis and Height Loss : Why it happens and how to


Get the latest news on health and wellness delivered to your inbox! Height is also on the list. Why do we shrink, what are the consequences, and what can we do? The December issue of Harvard Health Letter answers these questions. What are the consequences? But severe kyphosis (the medical term for being hunched over) sometimes affects breathing and causes neck and back pain. The other way to limit height loss is to keep bones strong to prevent fractures. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Find the best treatments and procedures for you.


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Digestive - Adult - Social Security Administration


We assess the effects of treatment, including medication, therapy, surgery, or any other form of treatment you receive, by determining if there are improvements in the symptoms, signs, and laboratory findings of your digestive disorder. If you have not received ongoing treatment or have not had an ongoing relationship with the medical community despite the existence of a severe impairment(s), we will evaluate the severity and duration of your digestive impairment on the basis of the current medical and other evidence in your case record. Symptoms of chronic liver disease may have a poor correlation with the severity of liver disease and functional ability. However, other abnormal lab tests, such as liver enzymes, serum total bilirubin, or ammonia levels, may have a poor correlation with the severity of liver disease and functional ability. Treatment for chronic viral hepatitis infections varies considerably based on medication tolerance, treatment response, adverse effects of treatment, and duration of the treatment. Common adverse effects of treatment are the same as noted in 5.00 D 4c(ii) for HCV, and generally end within a few days after treatment is discontinued. The extrahepatic manifestations of HBV and HCV may not correlate with the severity of your hepatic impairment. The required findings must be present on at least two evaluations at least 60 days apart within a consecutive 6-month period and despite continuing treatment as prescribed. Hepatopulmonary syndrome (5.05 E) is defined as arterial deoxygenation (hypoxemia) that is associated with chronic liver disease due to intrapulmonary arteriovenous shunting and vasodilatation in the absence of other causes of arterial deoxygenation. Thereafter, we will evaluate your residual impairment(s) by considering the adequacy of post‑transplant liver function, the requirement for post‑transplant antiviral therapy, the frequency and severity of rejection episodes, comorbid complications, and all adverse treatment effects. These manifestations may not correlate with the severity of your IBD. If your impairment does not meet any of the criteria of 5.06, we will consider the effects of your extraintestinal manifestations in determining whether you have an impairment(s) that meets or medically equals another listing, and we will also consider the effects of your extraintestinal manifestations when we assess your residual functional capacity. For example, if you have received a liver transplant, you may have become disabled before the transplant because of chronic liver disease. For example, if you have hepatitis B or C and you are depressed, we will evaluate your impairment under 12.04. (See §404.1526 and 416.926.) If your impairment(s) does not meet or medically equal a listing, you may or may not have the residual functional capacity to engage in substantial gainful activity.


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783.2 Abnormal loss of weight and underweight - ICD - 9


783.2 Abnormal loss of weight and underweight. ICD-9-CM 783.2 Abnormal loss of weight and underweight. This section includes symptoms, signs, abnormal results of laboratory or other investigative procedures, and ill-defined conditions regarding which no diagnosis classifiable elsewhere is recorded. Signs and symptoms that point rather definitely to a given diagnosis are assigned to some category in the preceding part of the classification.


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Weight Loss - Abnormal in Dogs - VCA Animal Hospitals


Weight Loss - Abnormal in Dogs. Weight loss in dogs may be associated with many normal and abnormal conditions. Weight loss can be caused by disorders in many of the body's organ systems, and can affect any or all organs. Questions that may provide insight into the cause of your dog's weight loss include: How can the cause of my dog's weight loss be diagnosed? What are some of the common diseases that cause weight loss? "Most chronic diseases will result in weight loss at some time during the course of the disease." In fact, most chronic diseases will result in weight loss at some time during the course of the disease. What can be done to treat my dog's weight loss? Treatment will be determined by the specific cause of your dog's weight loss. What is the prognosis for my dog's weight loss?


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Abnormal Weight Loss. Uninentional weight


The presentation will depend on the underlying cause. A thorough history and examination are essential in establishing the underlying cause and identifying appropriate investigations. Renal function and electrolytes: may indicate chronic kidney disease, Addison's disease. Other investigations will depend on the context of the weight loss. Possible further investigations may include HIV serology, endoscopy and autoimmune disease screen. Management is otherwise directed at the cause of weight loss and may include physical, psychological and social (eg, 'meals at home scheme', respite care) interventions. Elderly patients with unintentional weight loss are at higher risk of infection and depression.


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Weight Loss : Check Your Symptoms and Signs


What are the statistics for bile duct cancer? What is the treatment for bone cancer? What is the prognosis for bone cancer? What are the causes of colon cancer? What are the symptoms of colon cancer? What are the treatments and survival for colon cancer? What are the signs and symptoms of COPD? What are the risk factors for diabetes? What are the causes or risk factors for esophageal cancer? What are the symptoms and signs of esophageal cancer? What are the stages of esophageal cancer? What are the treatment for esophageal cancer? What are the symptoms of a stroke? What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes?


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Weight gain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


A commonly asserted "rule" for weight gain or loss is based on the assumption that one pound of human fat tissue contains about 3,500 kilocalories (often simply called calories in the field of nutrition). The assumption that a pound of human fat tissue represents about 3500 calories in the context of weight loss or gain is based on a review of previous observations and experiments by Max Wishnofsky published in 1958. He concludes that a 3500 calorie excess or deficit for a person meeting his assumptions, would lead to the gain or loss, respectively, of one pound of body weight. He notes that if the assumptions he makes are not met, a deficit of 3500 calories would not necessarily equate to a pound of weight loss. However, the physiology of weight gain and loss is complex involving numerous hormones, body systems and environmental factors. Lack of sufficient sleep has been suggested as a cause for weight gain or the difficulty in maintaining a healthy weight. Data from the CDC 's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, indicates that the average weight of women between ages 30 and 60 has increased by 20 pounds, or 14%, since 1976. However, the difference between women's average weight and desired weight had increased as well. In any case, weight gain and weight loss are still charged topics. The ever-present social stigma concerning weight gain, can have lasting and harmful effects on individuals, especially among young women.


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Evaluating and Treating Unintentional


Evaluating and Treating Unintentional Weight Loss in the Elderly. Elderly patients with unintentional weight loss are at higher risk for infection, depression and death. Food and Drug Administration has labeled no appetite stimulants for the treatment of weight loss in the elderly. Unintentional weight loss in the elderly patient can be difficult to evaluate. Selected Medications Associated with Unintentional Weight Loss in the Elderly. The use of formal screening instruments for depression, such as the Geriatric Depression Scale, 25 may be necessary in the elderly patient with unintentional weight loss. However, none are specifically indicated for the treatment of weight loss in elderly patients, and few have been studied in this population. Food and Drug Administration has not labeled any of these drugs for use in elderly patients with weight loss. Although medications may help promote appetite and weight gain in an elderly patient with unintentional weight loss, drugs should not be considered first-line treatment. Low body weight and weight loss in the aged. Unexplained weight loss in the ambulatory elderly. Diagnosis and management of weight loss in the elderly.


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Abnormal Body Weight


 Epidemiological data confirm that obesity accounts for 6% of primary infertility, and even more surprising, that low body weight in women accounts for 6% of primary infertility. What is the relationship between body weight and infertility? However, the effects of body weight on male reproductive function are not well studied and are more speculative. Not only should adults be aware of this relationship between body weight and reproductive function, but parents should be aware of the relationship as well.  Parents can counsel their adolescent children about the impact of body fat on the secondary sexual development and reproductive function of their adolescent children.  This is an opportunity for infertile couples to understand the impact of body weight on their reproductive capacity and take steps, without expert advice, to improve their reproductive capacity. Again, women who experience these signs and symptoms associated with changes in body weight can make the correlation, evaluate and treat themselves. Obese women are more apt to acknowledge the impact of obesity on reproductive function than are slender women. Slender women are more challenging than obese women to accept the idea that low body weight contributes to infertility. The key to success with slender women is convincing them that low body weight is associated with infertility.  Body weight disorders is one of the first potential causes of reproductive failure in both men and women.  These men and women need patience and understanding as they cope with the issue of body weight and its impact on their reproductive function. Bates GW: Body Weight and Reproduction.


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Weight Management - Are You at a Healthy Weight


Weight Management - Are You at a Healthy Weight? Your first step to find out if you are at a healthy weight is to find out what your BMI , or body mass index, is and what your waist size is. A healthy weight is one that is right for your body type and height and is based on your body mass index (BMI) and the size of your waist ( waist circumference ). If you are age 20 or older, use the Interactive Tool: Is Your BMI Increasing Your Health Risks? To check your BMI when you know your height in feet, weight in pounds, and waist circumference. If your BMI is less than 18.5, you are in the underweight category. If your BMI is between 18.5 and 24.9, you are in the recommended weight range for your height. If your BMI is 25 to 29.9, you are in the overweight category. If you are Asian, your recommended weight range may be lower.


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Weight Loss - Symptoms, Causes, Treatments


Weight Loss. What is weight loss? Weight loss as a symptom is any loss of weight that you cannot explain, or that you did not plan or work for through increased diet control and exercise. It can also be caused by loss of appetite due to dementia and by certain eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa or bulimia as well as malnutrition. Some drugs are also known to cause abnormal weight loss. Drug abuse involving excessive use of purgatives and laxatives, heavy street drug use, or smoking is also known to cause abnormal weight loss. Rapid or persistent weight loss is very dangerous and can cause severe damage to multiple organs and should always be investigated as soon as possible. Weight loss - unintentional. The diagnostic spectrum of unintentional weight loss. Investigation and management of unintentional weight loss in older adults.


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About Adult BMI - Healthy Weight - DNPAO


Why is BMI used to measure overweight and obesity? BMI can be used for population assessment of overweight and obesity. BMI is calculated the same way for both adults and children. For adults 20 years old and older, BMI is interpreted using standard weight status categories. For example, here are the weight ranges, the corresponding BMI ranges, and the weight status categories for a person who is 5' 9". For children and teens, the interpretation of BMI depends upon age and sex. For more information about interpretation for children and teens, read - What is a BMI percentile and how is it interpreted? Is BMI interpreted the same way for children and teens as it is for adults? BMI is interpreted differently for children and teens, even though it is calculated using the same formula as adult BMI. Children and teen's BMI need to be age and sex-specific because the amount of body fat changes with age and the amount of body fat differs between girls and boys. The correlation between the BMI and body fatness is fairly strong1,2,3,7, but even if 2 people have the same BMI, their level of body fatness may differ12. At the same BMI, Blacks have less body fat than do Whites13,14, and Asians have more body fat than do Whites15. The accuracy of BMI as an indicator of body fatness also appears to be higher in persons with higher levels of BMI and body fatness16. According to the BMI weight status categories, anyone with a BMI between 25 and 29.9 would be classified as overweight and anyone with a BMI over 30 would be classified as obese. A comparison of the Slaughter skinfold-thickness equations and BMI in predicting body fatness and cardiovascular disease risk factor levels in children.


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Weight Gain : Check Your Symptoms and Signs


What are the types of depression, and what are depression symptoms and signs? What are the risk factors and causes of depression? What are the risk factors for diabetes? What are the different types of diabetes? What are the other types of diabetes? What are the acute complications of diabetes? What are the chronic complications of diabetes? What are the risk factors for type 2 diabetes? What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? What is the treatment for type 2 diabetes? What are the complications of type 2 diabetes?


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Normal/Abnormal Loss - Valuation - Future Accountant


Abnormal Loss Units = Normal Output Units − Actual Output Units. A loss being normal or abnormal is dependent on the context and the nature of the process in consideration. If the answer is no, then the loss is Abnormal. This is the most appropriate method for assessing the cost incurred in case of the loss being normal loss. Valuation - Normal Loss and Normal Cost. The following aspects have to be noted in valuation of normal loss and ascertaining normal cost. The normal loss units can be sold at 1 per unit. The cost of good output after absorbing the value loss of normal loss units is called the Normal cost. This value is the same as the value that is obtained by adding value loss of normal loss units to the cost of good units. Cost incurred on Normal Loss Units. Abnormal loss units are valued at the same rate as good output units. Cost incurred on Abnormal Loss units. Therefore all the units that were lost as abnormal loss should also have been cost at the same rate of 100 per unit.


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Involuntary Weight Loss and Protein - Energy Malnutrition


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Weight loss - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Weight loss. [1] [2] [3] [7] [8] [9] Poor nutrient utilization can lead to weight loss, and can be caused by fistulae in the gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, drug-nutrient interaction, enzyme depletion and muscle atrophy. Unintentional weight loss can be the characteristic leading to diagnosis of diseases such as cancer [1] and type 1 diabetes . [7] Around 25% experience moderate to severe weight loss, and most others have some weight loss. [7] Greater weight loss is associated with poorer prognosis. People with HIV often experience weight loss, and it is associated with poorer outcomes. Medical treatment can directly or indirectly cause weight loss, impairing treatment effectiveness and recovery that can lead to further weight loss in a vicious cycle. Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks, [19] increase fitness, [20] and may delay the onset of diabetes . Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity.[ citation needed ] The least intrusive weight loss methods, and those most often recommended, are adjustments to eating patterns and increased physical activity, generally in the form of exercise. In order for weight loss to be permanent, changes in diet and lifestyle must be permanent as well.


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Assessment of Abnormal Growth Curves, American Family


More important is the child's rate of growth. Children whose growth parameters are at the extremes of the growth curve but whose growth rates are normal are likely to be healthy. Many children who are otherwise perfectly normal exhibit growth percentiles at the extremes of the growth curves. Differentiating the children at the extremes of the growth curve who are normal from those who require further evaluation depends on the child's growth rates. 8 Children whose growth parameters are at the extremes of the growth curve but who have normal growth rates are likely to be healthy. Most children in low weight percentiles demonstrate proportionately low percentiles for height and head size, with a normal rate of weight growth. If the patient's rate of height growth is increased, the evaluation should begin with thyroid studies and determination of growth hormone level ( Figure 2 ). Consultation is warranted if the initial evaluation fails to reveal an etiology for the increased rate of height growth. Most children in or below the fifth percentile for height have normal growth rates. Children with short stature who have normal growth rates and normal bone age are considered to have genetic short stature. Their physicial examinations are normal, their development is up-to-date and their rate of head growth parallels the normal growth curve.


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Weight control and diet - University of Maryland Medical


You can check your BMI at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BMI calculator . Extra weight around the mid-section or stomach area increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The risk of heart disease rises sharply for women with ratios above 0.8 and for men with ratios above 1.0. They may blame themselves for not having the will power to keep the weight off, and many regain more than they lost. The foods we eat when we are children may influence our food likes and dislikes for life. Some argue, in fact, that unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle cause the harm - not the extra weight itself - in people who are not severely obese. Most people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, and weight loss may be the key to controlling the current epidemic of type 2 diabetes. More weight puts pressure on the bones and joints. The following are some suggestions and observations on exercise and weight loss: Such products may increase the risk for thyroid disorders, heart attack, and stroke. The need for vitamin and mineral supplementation. Exercise and the support of others (for example, joining a support group with people who have undergone weight-loss surgery) are extremely important in achieving and maintaining weight loss after bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery for the treatment of morbid obesity: a meta-analysis of weight loss outcomes for laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and laparoscopic gastric bypass.


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Weight Loss - Unintentional - Symptoms, Causes, Tests


You or a family member loses more weight than is considered healthy for their age and height. You have lost more than 10 pounds OR 5% of your normal body weight over 6-12 months or less, and you don't know the reason. You have other symptoms along with the weight loss. The health care provider will do a physical exam and check your weight. You will be asked questions about your medical history and symptoms, including: When did the weight loss begin? Is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.


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Unintentional weight loss in older adults - PubMed Central


Given that unintentional weight loss is a common condition among older adults and is associated with adverse outcomes, our objective was to review the evidence regarding risk factors, differential diagnosis, prognosis, investigation and treatment of unintentional weight loss in this population. Based on evidence from a large cohort study that involved 4010 persons aged 65 years and older from 11 cities in Europe, the most common independent factors associated with unexplained weight loss are those related to food intake. 10 In multivariate analysis, only difficulties in bringing food to the mouth and chewing were significantly associated with weight loss. A chart review of 290 medical records from many centres in the United States that included long-term care residents and home care clients found six factors to be associated with unexplained weight loss. A cross-sectional study of 68 community-dwelling older adults in the midwestern United States (with an average age of 86 years and 51 of whom were women) showed that depression (using the Geriatric Depression Scale) was independently associated with weight loss (OR 1.65, 95% CI 1.12–2.43). 12 Another prospective study (n = 309) found that psychiatric and psychological diseases are one of the primary reasons for unexplained weight loss. Another prospective trial randomized 29 dieticians to the provision of usual nutritional care or a new medical nutritional therapy protocol for prevention and treatment of unexplained weight loss among long-term care residents. One study also looked at the use of dronabinol for unexplained weight loss. Medications that are not clearly required and that may be contributing to the weight loss should be discontinued or appropriate alternatives considered. What is the prognosis for those with unintentional weight loss? Although treatment remains a challenge, clinicians should attempt to identify and address factors that may be contributing to the weight loss. A comprehensive history and physical examination has the greatest potential for eliciting the cause(s) of weight loss.


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Weight Loss - Abnormal in Dogs - Animal Clinic


Weight Loss - Abnormal in Dogs. Weight loss in dogs may be associated with many normal and abnormal conditions. Weight loss is considered to be clinically significant when it exceeds ten percent of the normal body weight and when it is not associated with fluid loss or dehydration. Weight loss can be caused by disorders in many of the body's organ systems, and can affect any or all organs. Questions that may provide insight into the cause of your dog's weight loss include: How can the cause of my dog's weight loss be diagnosed? What are some of the common diseases that cause weight loss? "Most chronic diseases will result in weight loss at some time during the course of the disease." In fact, most chronic diseases will result in weight loss at some time during the course of the disease. However, some of the more common conditions associated with weight loss include: What can be done to treat my dog's weight loss? Treatment will be determined by the specific cause of your dog's weight loss. What is the prognosis for my dog's weight loss?


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