Weight Loss And Hair Loss In Horses


Geeks On Pets : Weight Loss in a Horse


Geeks On Pets > > Horses > > Horse Health > > Weight Loss in a Horse. Weight Loss in a Horse. Any horse that suffers from weight loss needs to be seen by a vet. The reason the horse is losing weight is because the horse’s body is not getting the nutrition it needs nor is it getting the calories it needs to get through the day. Even after tapping fat layers and with the horse eating normally or even more than usual, a horse that is losing weight has something interfering with its ability to absorb nutrition from its food. Eventually, as weight loss increases, the horse’s spine becomes prominent and sunken hollow spaces will appear over the eyes. There are many medical causes for unexplained weight loss in a horse. Treatment varies depending upon what the cause of the horse’s weight loss is. If the cause is a physical ailment, then the medical condition has to be treated before the horse can be expected to put weight back on.


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Rapid Weight Loss in Horse - SmartPak Blog


Topics › Rapid Weight Loss in Horse. Rapid Weight Loss in Horse. We have added some weight builder to his grain with no change and he is up to date on his deworming. The rapid weight loss you describe is very concerning so let’s make sure we’re on the same page. What is the body condition score (BCS) of each of your horses? What is the actual weight of each of your horses? Weight tapes are surprisingly accurate, especially when used by the same person in the same way each time. I recommend weighing your hay and grain to make sure he’s getting at least 2% of his body weight each day. I also recommend that you keep a journal of this horse’s BCS, weight, diet, preventive care and medical work to help you get to the bottom of this alarming issue. With luck you’ll find a trend that explains his weight loss.


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Natural Remedies for Hair Loss on Dogs, Cats and Ferrets


In the treatment of coat loss, Melatonin (a hormone secreted by the pituitary gland) is being used in veterinary medicine and by pet owners as a natural treatment for hair loss in dogs, cat and ferrets to help re-grow coat, to increase the appetite and put weight back on an animal after stress, surgery, illness or genetic related problems that have caused balding. Melatonin Dose for Dogs, Cats and Ferrets. Dose for Cats: Start with a dose of 0.75 mg of melatonin. The daily dose for ferrets should be given, 8 to 9 hrs after sunrise. There are several options for the treatment of adrenal disease in ferrets. Some veterinarians have used melatonin implants after adrenal surgery to aid in re-growing the ferrets coat faster, increase the appetite and put weight back on the animal. Is Melatonin Safe to Give to Dogs, Cats and Ferrets. Melatonin appears to be safe, but owners should be made aware of the experimental nature of the treatment and consult with a veterinarian accordingly. Melatonin can be purchased over the counter at most health food and drug stores. The remedies, approaches, and techniques described in these materials are not to be a substitute for, professional veterinary care or treatment.


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Hair Loss in Horses


Invariably, there will be nicks and scrapes to mar that perfection, but what about the times when portions of your horse's hair are missing? One important element to consider is whether or not your horse is itching and rubbing out the hair, or if the hair is simply missing because of a disease or immune process that attacks the skin. As years go by, susceptible horses tend to become more sensitized to the bites; the condition worsens with more aggressive self-excoriation (abrading away) of the skin and resultant larger areas of hair loss. The horn fly bites horses to obtain a blood meal, and this is associated with pruritus. Areas of hair loss will appear on the side of the neck or on the underbelly of the affected horse. Lice by themselves do not cause immediate hair loss, but they create an intense amount of pruritus and cause the horse to scratch itself incessantly. Spread the hair apart and look for dandruff-like particles that move. Mange is not a common condition in horses in the United States, but should be considered in a horse which is very itchy and losing hair. Rain scald lesions are crusty and scaling and the hair pulls away with the crust still attached, revealing an erosion beneath. Classic signs begin as a thinning of the mane and tail hairs, with eventual hair loss on the mane and tail. The diversity of skin problems in horses is varied, and in many cases visual inspection of the lesions might not accurately diagnose the reason for the problem. The best means of identifying what is wrong with your horse's skin is to have your veterinarian perform a skin biopsy. Where are the skin lesion(s) located? Are other horses on the premises similarly affected? What is the horse's diet (include supplements and horse treats)?


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Patchy Hair Loss


Hair loss in the horse can be caused by something simple, such as environment and temperature, or it can be caused by a more serious dermatophyte (fungus), such as ringworm, that invades the hair follicles of the skin. There are three phases of hair growth in the horse. If the area of hair loss is under the mane, it could be for a very benign reason encountered by many stables during the summer. Sweat is absorbed by the keratin layer of the epidermis, and the hair follicles remain moist for the duration of the hot weather. That moisture causes the hair follicle to soften and release the hair. The high protein and salt content in the horse’s sweat also can dry in contact with the horse’s skin and cause irritation, which can lead to hair loss as well. Hair loss due to heat and sweat also is commonly observed on the faces of horses, around the eyes and the ears. The sweat and dirt accumulate, spurring the loss of hair, and the horse appears as if he is wearing gray goggles. Proper management, careful grooming, and thorough weekly washing of the horse can help prevent hair loss due to the aforementioned reasons. If there is crusting associated with hair loss (along the leading edge of the bald area), the owner might be dealing with a dermatophyte such as ringworm. Before purchasing and applying products for these conditions, you should make sure that is, in fact, the cause of the hair loss. Your veterinarian will be able to advise you on the best course of treatment for your horse’s individual hair loss problem.


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Hair Loss in Horses


Hair Loss in Horses. Horses experience hair loss for a number of reasons. Changes in temperature and daylight hours influence a horse's hair follicle growth and loss. Hair loss in horses can have a number of physiological causes. The stress of pregnancy can cause horse hair to thin. Hair follicle infection, dermatitis, mites and parasitic fungi, such as ringworm, are among the more common conditions affecting skin health in horses that also can lead to hair loss.


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What to watch for in Horse Chronic Weight Loss


The common physiological causes of weight loss include: And weight loss results if dietary adjustments are not make. Weight loss is most commonly associated with one or more of the. Can lead to reduced food intake and loss of weight. Associated with weight loss. Some of the weight loss is. Can occupy the stomach in large numbers, and are potentials for. Associated weight loss is usually associated with chronic. The malabsorption and. Weight loss is most likely due to parasitism of the large. Maldigestion and malabsorption contribute to the weight loss. Of the weight loss encountered. Accelerated loss of nutrients in the urine and a markedly reduced. Include depression, anorexia, and P/U and P/D with weight loss. 2) The weight loss is not only due to severe metabolic.


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Horse Weight Loss - EquiMed - Horse Health


Dental and mouth problems may also lead to weight loss. Problems with swallowing caused by tumors or disease also lead to weight loss. Chronic, painful conditions such as arthritis, chronic laminitis, non-healing wounds, invasive tumors, or other conditions that reduce the horse's mobility, desire for food, and ability to graze will lead to weight loss, as will chronic infections such as EIA, internal abscesses, chronic bacterial infections, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Lymphosarcoma is the most common internal cancer in horses and often affects the liver, spleen, and lungs, leading to loss of weight. Chronic diarrhea and parasitism of the large intestine, granulomatous enteritis, and ulcerative lesions lead to loss of body fluids, competition for nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract, inflammation, micronutrient deficiencies, and loss of appetite and weight in stricken horses, with serious consequences if not diagnosed and treated. Another cause of serious weight loss in horses relates to insufficient feed, poor quality feed, or the wrong combination of feed for the horse's energy or nutrient requirements. Much of the prevention of weight loss is based on sound horse management, quick and accurate diagnosis of diseases and conditions, careful attention to the demands for nutritional intake based on exercise and performance levels, and knowledge of each particular horse's ongoing physical condition. Some horses are thin by nature, so it is mainly when a horse loses weight combined with a loss of condition that owners and handlers should be concerned. First and foremost, treatment of weight loss depends on accurate diagnosis and treatment of the disease or condition that is causing the horse to lose weight.


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Hair Loss in Horses : Skin Disorders of Horses


If an animal has hair loss and is also scratching the area excessively, the itching problem should be investigated first (see Skin Disorders of Horses: Itching (Pruritus) in Horses ). There are many causes of hair loss, which can be congenital (the animal is born with the condition) or acquired. Any disease that can affect hair follicles can cause hair loss. Some diseases can cause the animal discomfort leading to self-trauma and loss of hair. Acquired hair loss can be inflammatory or noninflammatory. Diseases that can directly cause destruction or damage to the hair shaft or follicle include bacterial, fungal, or parasitic infections; skin trauma such as burns; and (rarely) poisonings. These types of hair loss tend to be noninflammatory unless a secondary infection of the skin develops. Itching or pain is a common cause of acquired inflammatory hair loss. An accurate diagnosis of the cause of hair loss requires a detailed history and physical examination. In the physical examination, your veterinarian will note the pattern and distribution of hair loss. Skin biopsies are often needed to confirm bacterial and parasitic causes of hair loss or to identify cancerous causes of hair loss. Because identifying the cause of a skin condition may take some time, many veterinarians will provide or prescribe medication to relieve any discomfort or itching your horse may be experiencing in connection with the hair loss.


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Does Deworming Affect a Horse's Body Weight


“It is widely accepted that adult horses that are not dewormed and have heavy infestations of internal parasites suffer chronic weight loss,” shared Kathleen Crandell, Ph. Weight loss is presumably due to damage by the emergence of small strongyles from the large intestine, ultimately preventing horses from absorbing nutrients from their feed. In an attempt to shed more light on the impact of large, natural infections of internal parasites on digestion and body weight of horses, researchers* recruited two groups of mares, 10 mares in each group, in the first trimester of pregnancy. None of the mares in either group had been dewormed in the preceding 12 months, and all mares had heavy worm burdens, primarily small strongyles. Following administration of moxidectin, mares were successfully dewormed with fecal egg counts of 0 eggs/gram of feces throughout the trial; Mares that were not dewormed continued to have very high fecal egg counts, greater than 5,000 eggs/gram of feces; and. “Although the results initially suggest that heavy infestations of small strongyles did not adversely affect mares in terms of body weight, condition, or digestion, the study authors did note some concerns with their study design that might have influenced the results,” noted Crandell. Starch and proteins in such a diet are primarily digested in the small intestine, but damage caused by small strongyles is thought to occur in the large intestine. The study authors also noted that the mares included in this study might have been too young (age range, 3-8 years) to have sufficient damage to the large intestine due to small strongyle populations for a difference in digestion to be identified. They suggested that older horses (more than 20 years old) might have accrued sufficient parasite-related damage to the large intestine, and aged horse populations should be studied in future. The effect of deworming on apparent digestion, body weight and condition in heavily parasitized mares .


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How Hair Grows, Thinning Hair, Hair Loss Types and Causes


What Is Hair Loss? Hair is made up of a protein called keratin that is produced in hair follicles in the outer layer of skin. At any one time, about 90% of the hair on a person's scalp is growing. Understanding Hair Loss. Telogen - resting phase that lasts about two to three months; at the end of the resting phase the hair is shed and a new hair replaces it and the growing cycle starts again. Involutional alopecia is a natural condition in which the hair gradually thins with age. More hair follicles go into the resting phase, and the remaining hairs become shorter and fewer in number. Women experience a general thinning over the entire scalp, with the most extensive hair loss at the crown. But in about 90% of people with the condition, the hair returns within a few years. Telogen effluvium is temporary hair thinning over the scalp that occurs because of changes in the growth cycle of hair.


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Why Horses Lose Weight - Diet, Weather and Health


Why Horses Lose Weight. Learn Why Horses Lose Weight and What You Can Do About It. Even when there seems to be a lot of pasture grass to eat, horses can lose weight during the summer months. Over the years I’ve owned a number of horses that were hard to keep weight on. If you have a horse that just isn’t putting on, or maintaining a healthy weight, here are some reasons and what to do. The most obvious reason a horse may lose weight is because it is not eating enough. It’s not unusual for horses in the summer months to lose weight. In addition to protection from the heat of the day, and the bites of the mosquitoes and other flies, horses that have problems keeping weight on in summer could benefit from extra feed, whether it’s good-quality hay in the barn where it can relax and eat without fretting at the bugs, or a concentrate or supplement to help put on weight. The best way to keep your horse warm and at a healthy weight is to offer lots of good-quality hay. The most common reason for weight loss in older horses is dental problems . Even if they haven’t fallen out, they may have sharp edges and hooks that make it difficult and painful for the horse to chew its food efficiently. Many horses in the prime of their lives can have dental problems that interfere with chewing. This can lead to weight loss simply because the horse that is being bullied can’t get enough to eat in addition to being stressed. The first step to discovering the cause of the weight loss is to determine exactly how much the horse is eating. If after increasing the feed and being sure the horse is dewormed, there is no improvement you may need to consult a veterinarian about checking the horse’s teeth.


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Horse Hair Loss


Horse Hair Loss. Is your horse struggling with horse hair loss? Hair loss on horses can appear in many different ways on many different areas of the body. How your horse's hair loss presents itself determines how the hair loss can be treated. This article briefly touches on the following types of horse hair loss: Loss of hair through areas of missing mane. Hair Loss on a horse's tail. General Horse hair loss. Loss of hair - areas of missing mane. If your horse's hair loss is along the middle on the neck, it's a good chance the horse has accidentally rubbed out their mane. Hair Loss on horse's tails is caused when the horse itches and rub their tail on a rough surface. It is characterized by chunky scabs that, when picked, leave patches of hair loss on the horse.


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Reasons for sudden and severe hair loss in horses


A friends mare has been losing a LOT of hair on her neck, it falls out in clumps. The area is hot, and it seems to bother her to touch it. Its not ringworm or rainrot.she doesn't have hives or bumps or scabs, so its not likely an allergic reaction, and I don't think she's on any feed supplements;. Show more A friends mare has been losing a LOT of hair on her neck, it falls out in clumps. Its not ringworm or rainrot.she doesn't have hives or bumps or scabs, so its not likely an allergic reaction, and I don't think she's on any feed supplements; I've heard that the side affect of some supplements is hair loss. Its not in any particular shape, just large blotches all over the sides of her neck ( both sides ) does anyone have any idea what it could be?


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I have a 17 year old horse that is losing her hair and the


I have a 17 year old horse that is losing her hair and the. I have a 17 year old horse that is losing her hair and the bones on her head and between her ears are protuding. For a 1000 pound hose this is 15 - 20 pounds of hay per day (providing the horse can break it down appropriately. In my area our average flake of hay can range from 4-6 pounds depending on density of the bail, translating to as little as 3-4 flakes per day and as much as 5-6 flakes per day to maintain weight. That is, the microbes and fermentative process' are unable to breakdown and extract as many nutrients as they can with smaller particle sizes. Instead they are a complete feed balanced in Protein, Carbohydrates, Fats, vitamins, and minerals needed for the horse. The pellets, beet pulp, and oil are also good sources of easily digestible calories. I would also recommend placing your horse on the daily Strongid C 2x product. Also, I would recommend having your veterinarian perform a dental exam to determine if there are any dental problems leading to the weight loss. The average horse in your horses age range should have their teeth checked at least once a year. The best thing you can do is provide good nutrition, vitamin supplementation, supportive care, and time. Hair cultures can be obtained, and skin biopsies can be obtained to help determine the exact cause.


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Hair Loss in Horses - Causes, Treatments of Alopecia


There are a lot of reasons for horse hair loss. Most of the time hair loss is temporary and if you provide the right treatment at the right time the coat will be restored. Horse lice feed on blood and burrow into the skin causing inflammation, itching and hair loss. If the stable is not maintained well and kept clean and dry then the horses suffer from another condition called scald, which also leads to a lot of hair loss. Horses sometimes lose their hair as they grow older, if you have an old horse you may see some hair loss in the mane and tail. But although this hair loss could be normal, it is still important to monitor your horse's health and contact the vet if something appears to be wrong. When a horse's nutritional and hygiene needs are met it helps prevent a lot of skin problems and hair loss.


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Learn to Identify Horse Skin Problems - EQUUS Magazine


An informed investigation can help find the cause of the problem and speed the cure. With a grounding in basic dermatological detection, you can solve the crimes perpetrated against your horse's skin by villains within and without. At the first sign of something amiss with your horse's skin lead him into the sunlight and scrutinize the ailment's characteristics, beginning with its location. If the hair looks kinky and frayed, or if there's baldness with broken hairs within and surrounding the area, rubbing is probably the cause. Identify secretions on the skin. Note the characteristics of surface debris and local coloration. Skin scales and dandruff indicate that keratinization, the multistage process of skin building, has gone wild. Now give your hands a scrubbing (so you won't introduce additional pathogens), and let your fingers do the walking over your horse's skin. Feel for thickening of the skin, a consequence of rubbing. Then tug on the hairs in and around the area. If they pull out easily and in a clump, the skin disorder, not secondary scratching, is causing spontaneous hair loss. The condition is an allergic response to microscopic worms (Onchocerca) that infest the connective tissues and die in the skin. Once the warble larvae hatch, they burrow into the skin and migrate through the tissues. When did the problem start and how quickly has it progressed?


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What would cause my horse to loose his hair? - Yahoo Answers


The thing is, you need the vet to get involved in determining the cause. By examining the skin, the vet can determine whether or not it is an inflammatory condition. If it isn't, the vet can do testing to rule out metabolic causes until you get at what the actual cause might be. So I think you should have your vet examine your horses to figure this out. When is the last time you dewormed (yes the correct term is DEwormed! You are getting rid of worms not giving your horse worms) before a week ago? You are not going to see results on the outside condition of your horse in only 1 week if worms were causing his problems. Ask your vet when you have him/her come to check out why this horse is in such bad shape. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3 GP, 3 GPP, MP 4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600 MB. You can only upload a photo (png, jpg, jpeg) or a video (3gp, 3gpp, mp4, mov, avi, mpg, mpeg, rm). You can only upload a photo or a video.


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Horse Lice - EquiMed - Horse Health Matters


If not treated, sucking lice can cause anemia, weight loss, a rough, patchy coat, and slow the growth of young horses. The areas of the horse most commonly affected by both kinds of lice are the head, face, ears, neck, back, and around the base of the tail. Adult lice are pale-colored insects and can be seen by parting the hair in the affected area. Once a horse becomes affected with lice, treatment of the horse plus all tack and equipment is necessary to kill all lice and keep the horse from being affected again later. Visible lice under the mane, forelock, tail, and fetlocks. Three kinds of treatments are often used, although the only approved products for the treatment of horses with lice are powders such as Sevin. Wetable powders are mixed with water and sprayed on or sponged on, making sure the skin is thoroughly soaked for complete coverage. In addition to treating the horse, all equipment, especially blankets and brushes, should be cleansed thoroughly with the same insecticide. Boiling the equipment will also kill lice, nymphs, and eggs. Since lice cannot survive for long once they are off the horse's body, paddocks and stalls should be left vacant, if possible, for at least 14 days to starve active lice on trees, rails, or other equipment. Choice of treatment will depend on the time of year and the number of horses being treated.


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Horse Ulcer Symptoms


Many things make us suspect a horse has ulcers, such as blood in the stool, loss of appetite, and poor performance without any problems with legs or feet. In summary, the signs of horse ulcers include the following: There is only one way to confirm ulcers and that is to put an endoscope into the stomach and look for them. It's best to have foals and horses fast for 4-18 hours before scoping so that the area in the bottom, the glandular stomach, is visible. For example, horses with worms, such as strongyles, can have blood in the feces but not have ulcers. Horses that have a negative fecal blood test may have ulcers, but the blood leaking from the ulcers may have been digested by bacteria within the gut. Because fecal blood tests can have false positive and false negative results, endoscopy—not fecal blood tests—remains the best way to diagnose horse ulcers. If ulcers appear to be a problem for several horses in the barn, have the manure cultured for salmonella bacteria. Salmonella can cause ulcers throughout the colon, and horses with salmonella infections need special handling because salmonella bacteria infect people as well as horses and other animals.


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Horsetail : MedlinePlus Supplements


Taking horsetail along with "water pills" might decrease potassium in the body too much. Are there interactions with herbs and supplements? Horsetail and areca both reduce the amount of thiamine that the body has to use. Herbs and supplements that might lower blood sugar. Using it along with other herbs and supplements that have the same effect might cause blood sugar to drop too low in some people. Diagnostic approach to anaphylaxis by carrot, related vegetables and horsetail (Equisetum arvense) in a homemaker. Thiaminase activity in equisetum arvense and its extracts. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties of the hydroalcoholic extract of stems from Equisetum arvense L. Characterisation of polyphenols by HPLC-PAD-ESI/MS and antioxidant activity in Equisetum telmateia. Sedative and anticonvulsant effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Equisetum arvense. [Vasorelaxant activity of caffeic acid derivatives from Cichorium intybus and Equisetum arvense].


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Hair loss in horses?!!!!!? - Yahoo Answers


I was talking to one of my friends who said that one of her horses lost hair from a feed. I know of some horses here in the States that had mange and it looked horrible. Espesially on your horse that you love! Is there anything in the pasture she could be rubbing on that would cause that? I would stop the feed that could be causing it. Also, you can try getting some corn oil and pouring some over her feed. Also, if she is around other horses, i would suggest keeping an eye out for similar symptoms that are effecting the other horses, since it may be contagious. If you have had a blanket on her all winter that could have damaged part of her hair causing it to fall out, rain rot is of ourse anyother good explanation. Many horses are sensitive to the type of blanket that they wear and or tack they have, maybe you should giv her a bath with medicated shampoo from Absorbine (i think) or you can use medicated spray on the bald areas to help it. She could also have a type of rash you could get from sharing brushes tack and blankets. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG or JPEG. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600 MB. You can only upload a photo or video.


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