Rapid Weight Loss And Breast Cancer


Weight Gain Prior to Diagnosis and Survival from Breast Cancer


Background: To examine the effects of prediagnostic obesity and weight gain throughout the life course on survival after a breast cancer diagnosis, we conducted a follow-up study among a population-based sample of women diagnosed with first, primary invasive, and in situ breast cancer between 1996 and 1997 (n = 1,508). Women diagnosed with postmenopausal breast cancer who gained more than 12.7 kg after age of 50 years up to the year before diagnosis had a 2- to 3-fold increased risk of death due to all-causes (HR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.63-4.43) and breast cancer (HR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.36-6.43). We investigated the effects of prediagnostic adult weight and weight change on mortality among women with breast cancer who participated in the population-based Long Island Breast Cancer Study Project (LIBCSP). Because there were very few cases considered to be underweight (BMI 12.7 kg after the age of 50 years had an increased risk of breast cancer death (HR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.36-6.43) after adjustment for age at diagnosis, history of hypertension, and weight at age 50 years. However, there was an observed increased risk of overall and breast cancer death among postmenopausal women when comparing weight gain > 5 kg between the ages of 40 and 50 years to those who did not gain weight (overall death HR, 2.69; 95% CI, 1.25-5.79; breast cancer death HR, 2.73; 95% CI, 0.89-8.43). In this population-based study of 1,508 with incident breast cancer with a median of 5.84 years of follow-up, we found that BMI at diagnosis and adult weight gain before diagnosis were associated with increased breast cancer–specific and overall mortality among both women who were premenopausal and postmenopausal at the time of diagnosis. Among women with a postmenopausal breast cancer diagnosis, we also found that high levels of weight gain during the perimenopausal and postmenopausal years were strongly associated with decreased survival after a breast cancer diagnosis. We found that a high BMI and body weight at the time of diagnosis was associated with over a 2-fold increase in mortality among women who were premenopausal at the time of breast cancer diagnosis. Our results are similar to those found in two previous studies that have observed a stronger association between mortality and obesity among women who were premenopausal at the time of their breast cancer diagnosis than those who were postmenopausal ( 8 , 25 ). Our results for prediagnostic weight and weight gain over the adult life course are compatible to another study that also investigated adult weight gain on breast cancer survival. The 2-fold increase in the HR for breast cancer mortality among postmenopausal women seen in our analysis for weight gain in the years leading up to menopause, from age 40 to 50 years, is consistent with this hypothesis.


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Weight Gain


Although people more commonly lose weight during cancer treatment, some people gain weight. However, significant weight gain may affect a person's health and ability to undergo treatment. Weight gain is an especially important health issue for women with breast cancer because more than half experience weight gain during treatment. Reports have shown that weight gain during treatment is linked to a poorer prognosis, which is the chance of recovery. The following cancer treatments may lead to weight gain: Some chemotherapy causes the body to hold on to excess fluid in cells and tissues, which is called edema . It may also cause menopause in some women, which decreases their metabolism, increasing the likelihood of weight gain. Steroids may also cause the loss of both weight and muscle mass, which is called wasting. Hormonal therapy for the treatment of breast, uterine, prostate, and testicular cancers involves medications that decrease the amount of estrogen or progesterone in women and testosterone in men. They can help find out the possible cause of the weight gain and the best way to manage it. Consider the following ways to address weight gain through diet and physical activity:


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Does intentional weight loss reduce cancer risk


Does intentional weight loss reduce cancer risk? Whether intentional weight loss might reduce this excess risk is not yet proven. Oestrogen levels drop and SHBG levels increase coincident with intentional weight loss, with about a one-third reduction in free oestradiol to be expected from a 10% weight loss. Because both cancer incidence and levels of circulating cancer biomarkers drop fairly rapidly following weight loss, intentional weight loss may well lead to meaningful reductions in cancer risk with a short latency time.


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Breast Cancer Patients Who Gain Weight After


Breast cancer patients who gain weight after diagnosis have worse prognosis. Many women experience weight gain during chemotherapy and endocrine treatment for breast cancer. The evidence suggests that women should monitor their weight and avoid weight gain after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Weight gain is common during breast cancer treatment. Nevertheless, for most women, the weight gain after breast cancer is modest - one study estimated that a weight gain of more than 22 lbs takes place in fewer than 10% of breast cancer survivors. One study reported that younger women and women who were underweight or normal weight at the time of cancer diagnosis were the most likely to gain weight and to experience increases in percent body fat. A large minority of women, including some whose weight was stable during treatment, also experience progressive weight gain in the years after treatment. However, note that one 2012 study reported that weight loss during anthracycline chemotherapy was associated with poorer survival in women with early-stage breast cancer than stable weight. Study that examined weight gain among women aged 40 to 54 who received chemotherapy reported that women of normal weight gained an average of 4.3 pounds during the first year. Greater weight gain was found among women who had lower body mass index ( BMI ) at diagnosis, had more advanced disease stage, were younger, were premenopausal, or who had been treated with chemotherapy or radiation treatment during the first six months after cancer diagnosis. Weight gain after developing breast cancer worsens prognosis. Study reported that women with ER+ disease who had a pre- to post-diagnosis weight gain (measured at approximately the two-year mark) of at least 10% were more likely to experience late recurrence (more than five years after diagnosis) of breast cancer. Study investigated the effects of weight gain on survival among 1,436 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1996 or 1997. A study that included 5,204 Nurses' Health Study participants who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1976 and 2000 reported that among never-smoking women, those whose BMI increased by more than 2.0 kg/m(2) (median gain, 17.0 lbs) had 1.64 times the risk of breast cancer-specific death as women who maintained their weight during a median follow-up period of nine years.


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April 2007 : Weight Management During and After Breast


From my perspective as a nutrition professional, the best ones are the ones that work for you, and every woman can be different. So you may want to discuss with your doctor if there are other options for medications if you really believe it's the tamoxifen that is the problem. Melinda Irwin I would have a more in-depth talk with your oncologist about this issue and how much it's bothering you. Question from Mel: What about the use of vitamins and supplements in weight loss? I keep hearing that there are good carbs and bad carbs, like on the South Beach diet. Melinda Irwin The other thing to remember is that alcohol has calories and sugar, so if you're trying to lose weight it may be best to have water or a lower calorie beverage. I would suggest that you not just think of body weight as the only measure of your health. If you're in your young 50s and were going through menopause either after or during the tamoxifen and prior to the Actonel, that could have caused some of the weight gain. Irwin, I saw that you've published on the effect of exercise on breast cancer biomarkers and the influence of physical activity on obesity. How much exercise is recommended to influence the effect on biomarkers, and what does that mean? Question from Juicyfruit: Could you talk about the recommendation I've read that suggests eating lots of different colors of fruits and veggies? If you have been exercising prior to treatment, maintain that program as best as you can to avoid any potential weight gain and to maintain your lean body mass, which may decrease as a result of therapy.


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Cancer and Weight Loss as a Symptom


Unexplained weight loss can be a symptom of many conditions - cancer included. Weight Loss and Cancer. Unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of cancer , though vague and non-specific. When To See Your Doctor About Weight Loss. Generally, you should see your doctor if you have lost 5 percent of your body weight within six months or less and have done so without modifying your diet or exercising. Your doctor may ask you several questions to help identify why you are losing weight. Your doctor will want to know the basics like when you first started to lose weight and how much you have lost. Remember, Weight Loss Doesn't Mean You Have Cancer. You may also get a better understanding of what your symptoms, like weight loss , may mean by using the About.com Symptom Checker , an interactive health education tool.


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Weight loss - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Weight loss. [1] [2] [3] [7] [8] [9] Poor nutrient utilization can lead to weight loss, and can be caused by fistulae in the gastrointestinal tract, diarrhea, drug-nutrient interaction, enzyme depletion and muscle atrophy. Unintentional weight loss can be the characteristic leading to diagnosis of diseases such as cancer [1] and type 1 diabetes . [7] Around 25% experience moderate to severe weight loss, and most others have some weight loss. [7] Greater weight loss is associated with poorer prognosis. People with HIV often experience weight loss, and it is associated with poorer outcomes. Medical treatment can directly or indirectly cause weight loss, impairing treatment effectiveness and recovery that can lead to further weight loss in a vicious cycle. Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks, [19] increase fitness, [20] and may delay the onset of diabetes . Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity.[ citation needed ] The least intrusive weight loss methods, and those most often recommended, are adjustments to eating patterns and increased physical activity, generally in the form of exercise. In order for weight loss to be permanent, changes in diet and lifestyle must be permanent as well.


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Rapid Weight Loss and Cancer


Rapid Weight Loss & Cancer. Rapid weight loss may be a sign of cancer. One of the first signs of cancer is rapid weight loss. Cancer cells rob your body of nutrients, causing weight loss, poor nutrition and a general decline in health. Depending on the type of cancer, the warning signs may vary. Causes of Rapid Weight Loss. Your doctor can evaluate your weight loss and find the cause and recommend the proper treatment.


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Unintentional rapid weight loss : What causes it


Unintentional rapid weight loss: What causes it? Unexplainable weight loss can be a symptom of a number of diseases or conditions.   Weight loss due to gastrointestinal or digestive diseases and disorders. These are likely symptoms of malabsorption and may lead to weight loss.   Hyperthyroidism causing weight loss. When the thyroid gland overproduces certain hormones, unexplained weight loss may occur.   Medication and a resulting weight loss. Read the accompanying packaging on your prescription medications and talk to your pharmacist or doctor if you suspect this might be the cause of your weight loss.   Weight loss as a result of cancer or diabetes. With certain types of cancer, both the disease and the treatments may contribute to weight loss.


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Weight Loss


Weight loss is common among people with cancer and is often the first noticeable sign of the disease. As many as 40% of people with cancer report unexplained weight loss at the time of diagnosis, and up to 80% of people with advanced cancer experience weight loss and cachexia, or wasting, which is the combination of weight loss and muscle mass loss. Weight loss and muscle wasting also often come with fatigue , weakness, loss of energy, and an inability to perform everyday tasks. Controlling cancer-related weight loss is important for your comfort and well-being. Consider asking your doctor about receiving food through a tube that goes directly to the stomach, which may help people with head and neck or esophageal cancers who are having difficulty chewing or difficulty swallowing . Megestrol acetate (Megace) is a progesterone hormone that can improve appetite, weight gain, and a person's sense of well-being. Steroid medications can increase appetite, improve a person's sense of well-being, and help with nausea, weakness, or pain. Other medications are being studied to help people with cancer improve their appetite and gain weight. Nutrition counseling may help people with cancer get essential nutrients, such as protein, vitamins, and minerals into their diet and maintain a healthy body weight. You can also find a dietitian through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. These details can help you work with your health care team to find the best way to maintain your weight, or gain needed weight, during cancer treatment.


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Rapid Weight Loss : Is It Safe? Does It Work


Rapid weight loss can be quick and easy - if you believe the advertising claims. Fad diets and weight loss supplements promise a slimmer body in no time. Do any of these products really produce rapid weight loss? And what are the risks of such fast weight loss? Web MD took a look at some rapid weight loss claims, as well as the available evidence. Rapid Weight Loss: What Is It? Dozens of diet supplements promise to speed weight loss. One proven method of rapid weight loss is the medically supervised very low-calorie diet (VLCD). There seems to be no end to the dubious ideas promoted in the name of rapid weight loss. Does Rapid Weight Loss Work? The FDA also does not regulate claims made by over-the-counter weight loss products. Aside from the very low-calorie diet and weight loss surgery , no other product, pill, or diet has been proven to work for fast weight loss.


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Losing weight safely after breast cancer treatment


Losing weight safely after breast cancer treatment. Many people put on weight during or after treatment for breast cancer. We look at the best way to lose weight safely and hopefully for good. If you’ve had breast cancer treatment and gained a few pounds there could be several reasons for this. But there’s a good reason to maintain a healthy weight besides the way you look. Lose weight for good. ‘Often they’re not based on scientific evidence’ says Lucy ‘and you’re more likely to keep the weight off if you lose it slowly and steadily. ‘Try to eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. You could try a brisk walk or Breast Cancer Care’s health and fitness DVD which includes an exercise class suitable for anyone after treatment. Eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day. After finishing treatment including surgery and chemotherapy she decided it was time for her to lose weight. ‘For me losing weight was about getting control of my life back after breast cancer’ says Margaret who joined a local slimming club. ‘I eat lots of fruit vegetables salads and low-fat foods’ she says. ‘If you want to lose weight you’ve got to do it for yourself not because someone tells you that you should’ she says. Join us for a 5, 10 or 20 mile walk and help us be there for women with breast cancer from day one.


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Weight Gain, Obesity and Cancer Risk


Weight Gain, Obesity & Cancer Risk. Board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. To clarify the effects of weight gain on cancer risk, researchers in 2007 conducted an analysis of many studies reported in medical journals that describe 282,137 cases of cancer . The researchers wanted to see if weight gain had an effect on the risk for certain cancer types. In particular, the researchers looked at the risk of cancer associated with a weight gain corresponding to an increase of 5 kg/m2 in body mass index ( BMI ).


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Obesity and Cancer Risk - National Cancer Institute


Obesity and Cancer Risk. What is known about the relationship between obesity and cancer? What is known about the relationship between obesity and breast cancer? The relationship between obesity and breast cancer risk may also vary by race and ethnicity. What is known about the relationship between obesity and endometrial cancer? Overweight and obesity have been consistently associated with endometrial cancer, which is cancer of the lining of the uterus. What is known about the relationship between obesity and colorectal cancer? What is known about the relationship between obesity and kidney cancer? What is known about the relationship between obesity and esophageal cancer? What is known about the relationship between obesity and pancreatic cancer? What is known about the relationship between obesity and thyroid cancer? What is known about the relationship between obesity and gallbladder cancer? The relationship between obesity and prostate cancer has been studied extensively.


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HIV and Weight Loss - Health Encyclopedia - Norris Cotton


If you lose weight fast, it may be because you have another infection along with HIV. You may lose weight if you can't eat enough food or if your body can't absorb all the nutrients from the food you eat. You may not feel like eating because you are sick to your stomach or food just doesn't appeal to you. You may not feel like eating because you are depressed. Depression can make you lose your appetite. If you have diarrhea, your body may not be able to absorb all of the nutrition from your food. If you are a man and you have a low level of the hormone testosterone , your body may not be able to turn your food into muscle tissue. If you are sick to your stomach or don't feel like eating, discuss your medicines with your doctor. If you don't feel like eating, eat your favorite foods. Exercise may help you feel better and strengthen your muscles. It also may improve your immune system, which can help you fight infection.


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Cancer treatment shows promise for rapid weight loss


A synthetic peptide that inhibits blood supply, a strategy employed in many cancer drugs, is found to kill fat cells and improve metabolic function in trials involving monkeys. The trick behind the therapy: killing fat cells by robbing them of the blood supply that nourishes them. Much of that loss came in the three weeks after the drug was discontinued, during which the treated macaques continued to become lighter and leaner. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, who pioneered the approach with his wife, Renata Pasqualini, a cancer researcher at the center, expressed satisfaction at the treated monkeys' weight loss and metabolic improvements. But he acknowledged that "we're a little bit at a loss to explain" all of the effects in the two species of macaques and a small group of baboons that were tested. He called the study a "proof of concept," and added that "we're not done" tinkering with the structure of the potential drug. Adipotide was designed to attach itself just to the blood vessels that feed the body's fat deposits. Instead, the fat cells are burned as fuel. That, said Arap, was a surprise, since weight loss typically ramps up the appetite as the body struggles to preserve its fat supplies. "What they have tapped into is a whole layer of biology about how adipose tissue communicates with the brain and other organs about its status, and we didn't know anything about that until they came along," said Seeley, who was not involved in the study. Others caution that much more work needs to be done to better understand adipotide's mode of action and safety before a drug based on the peptide is ready for use in patients. But, he added, the researchers will need to clearly show that adipotide is reducing blood vessels that nourish fat without harming other blood vessels, as well as how appetite changes and metabolic improvements are related to that effect.


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Dr. Oz's Two - Week Rapid Weight - Loss Diet, Pt 1 - Dr. Oz's


Clip 1 of 7. Oz's Two-Week Rapid Weight-Loss Diet, Pt 1. Oz's step-by-step plan to slim down and get healthy. Clip 2 of 7. Oz's Two-Week Rapid Weight-Loss Diet, Pt 2. Clip 3 of 7. Oz's Two-Week Rapid Weight-Loss Diet, Pt 3. Clip 4 of 7. Oz's Two-Week Rapid Weight-Loss Diet, Pt 4. Clip 5 of 7. Clip 6 of 7. Oz's simple storage rules.


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Colon Cancer and Unexplained Weight Loss


Many of us wouldn't want to question unexplained weight loss. We'd just be happy to be losing weight! Though the prospect of losing weight without even trying may seem like a blessing, it really is something to question. Reasons for Unintentional Weight Loss. Possible causes of unintentional weight loss include depression, frequent diarrhea, hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland), infection, poor nutrition, AIDS, and cancer. If you're trying to figure out why someone else is losing weight unintentionally, you may also want to look into drug abuse, eating disorders, and smoking. Unexplained Weight Loss and Colon Cancer. You're unlikely to notice the diversion of blood and nutrients, but sometimes tumors release chemicals that increase the body's metabolism (such as burn calories faster), which can lead to unexplained weight loss. Medical Attention for Unexplained Weight Loss. (That would be about 10 pounds for a 200-pound person.) You should also call your doctor if you experience unexplained weight loss in conjunction with other potential colon cancer symptoms . "Colon Cancer: Signs and Symptoms." Mayo Clinic 17 Aug. "Signs and Symptoms of Cancer." American Cancer Society 28 Feb. "Weight Loss - Unintentional." National Institutes of Health 22 Jan. If you're trying to figure out why someone else is losing weight unintentionally, you may also want to look into drug abuse, eating disorders , and smoking.


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Weight Loss After Breast Cancer Diagnosis May not Improve


In Journal of Clinical Oncology, Litton et al 1 and Griggs and Sabel 2 have suggested weight reduction as a potential antitumor intervention in obese women with newly diagnosed breast cancer. A wide variety of studies have documented the more advanced disease at diagnosis, 3 and worse prognosis after diagnosis, 4 – 6 associated with obesity in women with breast cancer. At inception, the developing genetic characteristics of each breast cancer are apparently influenced by the biochemical-hormonal tissue environment of the patient, resulting in different primary tumor genetic characteristics in obese and nonobese women. These include differences in the frequency and concentration of hormone receptor sites, 7 , 8 nuclear grade, 1 and cancer stage, 1 and seem likely to have already influenced primary growth, metastasis, and growth of metastatic tissues before tumor diagnosis. These differences were independent of patient age, smoking habits, tumor stage, and estrogen receptor status, and seemed explainable only by the presence of more highly malignant tumors among these obese women associated with earlier tumor metastasis, or by the more rapid growth of node metastases before diagnosis. Any study examining the influence of postdiagnosis weight reduction on subsequent tumor prognosis would include the potential handicap of creating undeserved guilt among women with recurrent tumors who had been unsuccessful in their efforts to lose weight. Although the diagnosis of breast cancer may stimulate some women to be more successful in these programs, weight loss may be more difficult for others because of their new diagnosis as well as any new symptoms induced by antitumor therapy.


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Oncology : rapid weight loss and cancer


Rapid weight loss and cancer. My Mother has had gall bladder problems and she also has colon cancer. She had a quite a fever and infection in her blood.  She was on antibiotics for over two weeks but is in the clear for that.  She generally hasn't felt well for a long time and refused tests last fall of 2005 which hasn't helped matters concerning the colon cancer.  She was too weak to have the cancer operation where they would have removed her rectum where the tumour is.  I talked with the head nurse at the health care center and all they have to say is  that she needs to eat more.  I know if another two weeks go by and this weight keeps dropping off her this rapidly that she may not have long to live.   I am all alone in all this and had hoped to bring her where I live 3,000 miles away to live with me but now with the realization and fact that she has lost so much weight, it seems improbable unless she makes some recovery. (where she lives) for two months now and without medicare so I have to think about that too.  The rapid weight loss could be because of the cancer and if it is, she may not live very much longer and if it is because she is not eating, then eating will help, but she may still have wide spread cancer and die anyway. I suggest that you see her for yourself, don't try moving her and spend time with her before she dies. I can help you with most all cancer questions and treatments etc.


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Weight Loss - Cancer Treatment, Oncology at Lifespan


Moderate weight loss is a normal and common side effect of cancer treatment. If you are overweight at the start of your treatment, a slight weight loss is not a concern. You don't have to be strict about fats in your diet during cancer treatment. If you lose weight during treatments, it means you need more calories in your diet.


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Weight Management and its Role in Breast Cancer Rehabilitation


Adult weight change and risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Association of gain and loss of weight before and after menopause with risk of postmenopausal breast cancer in the Iowa women’s health study. Body weight and risk of breast cancer in BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers. Weight gain and quality of life in women treated with adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Weight gain in women with breast cancer treated with adjuvant cyclophosphomide, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Weight and body composition changes during and after adjuvant chemotherapy in women with breast cancer. Weight, weight gain, and survival after breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in weight and body composition in women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. Post-diagnosis weight gain and breast cancer recurrence in women with early stage breast cancer. Obesity and weight change in relation to breast cancer survival.


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Cancer, Weight Changes, Muscle Loss, Fatigue


Treating and managing these symptoms can help you feel better and allow you to continue with more of your usual activities. These substances can lead to weight loss, muscle loss, and a decrease in appetite. They can also lead to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and mouth sores, which can affect your ability to eat normally, further contributing to weight and muscle loss. Fatigue is also a factor, since the decreases in exercise and other physical activities that happen when you’re not feeling well can also contribute to muscle loss. How are weight changes and muscle loss treated? These drugs can increase appetite for some people and may help to prevent weight and muscle loss, but they do not build up lost muscle tissue. What can I do to help maintain my weight and build strength? You can also try some upper body exercises while sitting in a chair – moving your arms up and down and front to back can help maintain flexibility. Making a fist and lifting your arms up and down in front of you can increase strength. Note the type of exercises or other physical activities you do and how they affect your mood and energy level. Nutritionists and physical or occupational therapists can advise you on other ways to maintain your weight and build strength as you cope with cancer.


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Stomach cancer and weight loss - Cancer Research UK


For many people, the side effects of cancer and treatment make it difficult to eat enough to stay at a healthy weight. Weight loss is a very common symptom for people with cancer, particularly in people with stomach , pancreatic or oesophageal cancer (cancer of the food pipe). You may be eating normally, but your body may not be absorbing all the nutrients in the food you eat. It is a constant reminder of your illness and can affect how you feel about yourself. Having stomach cancer will affect eating and drinking habits, whatever the stage of cancer or the treatment . Trial and error is really the only way to find out if a particular food upsets you. Write down in one column what you eat and the time and date. You can then look back and find out which foods upset your system. To put on weight you need more calories. Fat is the best way to get concentrated calories but after surgery to the stomach, you may find it difficult to tolerate high fat foods. You can get these on prescription from the GP. After stomach surgery, your doctors may have advised you to take extra calcium, vitamin D and iron. Having all or part of the stomach removed may mean you can't absorb enough from a normal diet. You may need to have injections of Vitamin B 12. You may benefit from seeing your dietician.


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Eating to Lose Weight After Treatment


Why do some people with breast cancer gain weight? Many people gain weight when they are treated with chemotherapy and steroids. This weight gain may be because of the enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which is controlled by insulin. If LPL is on a fat cell, it pulls fat into the cell and makes it fatter. With less estrogen in the body, LPL can pull fat into fat cells and store it there. And like many people, you may be certain that taking a hormonal therapy medication makes you gain weight and makes it nearly impossible to lose weight. Many people believe that if you eat fewer calories than you burn each day, you’ll lose weight, and if you eat the same number of calories that you’ll burn, you’ll maintain a healthy weight. She’s probably going to lose some weight and get a lot more nutrients from her food. And counting calories is only one way to lose weight. The first thing to do if you want to lose weight is to talk to your doctors and a registered dietitian about a safe and sensible plan designed specifically for you and your needs.


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Overweight, Obesity, and Breast Cancer - Susan G. Komen


Body weight and breast cancer risk before menopause. Body weight and breast cancer risk after menopause. How can body weight affect breast cancer risk after menopause? Weight gain and breast cancer risk. Gaining weight in adulthood appears to increase the risk of breast cancer before and after menopause [ 65-68 ]. The weight a woman gains after menopause also appears to increase their risk of breast cancer [ 65,69 ]. Weight loss and breast cancer risk. Losing weight after menopause may help lower risk of breast cancer [ 65 ]. Weight loss in adulthood and breast cancer risk before menopause is under study [ 71 ]. Body shape and breast cancer risk. Body weight and breast cancer survival.


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Nutrition in Cancer Care


PCM in cancer results from multiple factors most often associated with anorexia, cachexia, and the early satiety sensation frequently experienced by individuals with cancer. Anorexia, the loss of appetite or desire to eat, is typically present in 15% to 25% of all cancer patients at diagnosis and may also occur as a side effect of treatments. Cachexia is estimated to be the immediate cause of death in 20% to 40% of cancer patients; it can develop in individuals who appear to be eating adequate calories and protein but have primary cachexia whereby tumor-related factors prevent maintenance of fat and muscle. The etiology of cancer cachexia is not entirely understood. Anorexia, cachexia, and nutrition. American Cancer Society: Nutrition for the Person with Cancer: A Guide for Patients and Families. Vigano A, Watanabe S, Bruera E: Anorexia and cachexia in advanced cancer patients. Shils ME: Nutrition and diet in cancer management. Ottery FD: Cancer cachexia: prevention, early diagnosis, and management. Zeman FJ: Nutrition and cancer. Also known as cachexia, this condition is one of advanced protein-calorie malnutrition and is characterized by involuntary weight loss, muscle wasting, and decreased quality of life.[ 1 , 2 ] Tumor-induced weight loss occurs frequently in patients with solid tumors of the lung, pancreas, and upper gastrointestinal tract and less often in patients with breast cancer or lower gastrointestinal cancer. Although an individual’s nutritional status may be compromised initially by the diagnosis of cancer, thorough nutritional screening procedures and the timely implementation of nutritional therapies may markedly improve the patient’s outcome. Several approaches to the treatment of cancer cachexia have been reported, and a variety of agents have been studied for their effects on appetite and weight. Table 1 lists several medications that have been proposed to treat the symptoms of cancer cachexia.[ 13 ] However, the management of cachexia remains a complex challenge, and integrated multimodal treatment targeting the different factors involved has been proposed.


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Breast Cancer Treatment and Weight Changes


Breast Cancer Treatment and Weight Changes. Your weight might change when you get treated for breast cancer . What Might Cause Me to Gain Weight? Menopause also causes you to gain more body fat and lose lean muscle. Another reason for weight gain is the use of corticosteroids. They can make you lose muscle mass in your arms and legs, and gain belly fat, too. Women treated with steroids may also put on pounds, but the weight gain is usually seen only after weeks of continuous use. Some research suggests that weight gain is also related to lack of exercise . When you get your cancer treatment , it’s common to feel stress and have some fatigue , nausea , or pain. Weight gain may also be related to intense food cravings . Do Other Breast Cancer Medications Cause Weight Gain? Many women taking tamoxifen have felt the drug was responsible for their weight gain.


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Unexplained Weight Loss


Understanding unexpected weight loss. What are some possible causes of weight loss, what questions might your doctor ask, and what can you expect as you and your doctor seek to determine the cause? What Is Unexplained Weight Loss? Weight loss may occur because you are eating less, or because your body is using nutrients differently due to a change in your metabolism or the growth of a tumor. If you are losing weight without trying it is important to make an appointment to see your doctor, even if you think there is an explanation for your weight loss. Diagnosing Weight Loss That Isn’t Intentional. If you have unintentional weight loss, your doctor will first take a careful history and do a physical exam. How fast have you been losing weight? Have you ever had weight loss like this before? How upsetting is the weight loss to you? Causes of Unexplained Weight Loss. There are many reasons for unexplained weight loss, some serious, and some more of a nuisance. Importance of Unintentional Weight Loss. Unintentional weight loss in older adults . Weight Loss – Unintentional.


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Fast weight loss : What's wrong with it


The concern with fast weight loss is that it usually takes extraordinary efforts in diet and exercise — efforts that could be unhealthy and that you probably can't maintain as permanent lifestyle changes. A weight loss of 1 to 2 pounds a week is the typical recommendation. Although that may seem like a slow pace for weight loss, it's more likely to help you maintain your weight loss for the long term. Also, if you lose a lot of weight very quickly, you may not lose as much fat as you would with a more modest rate of weight loss. Instead, you might lose water weight or even lean tissue, since it's hard to burn that many fat calories in a short period. In some situations, however, faster weight loss can be safe if it's done the right way. In addition, some diets include an initiation phase to help you jump-start your weight loss. For example, the Mayo Clinic Diet has a quick-start phase in which you might lose 6 to 10 pounds in the first two weeks. You can lose weight quickly with an approach like this because it combines many healthy and safe strategies at once — no gimmicks or extreme dieting. After the initial two-week period, you transition into the recommended weight loss of 1 or 2 pounds a week, which is not only safe but also realistic and sustainable for the long term. Aim for a healthy weight: Information for patients and the public.


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Does body weight affect cancer risk


Does body weight affect cancer risk? What does the American Cancer Society recommend about body weight? These factors are all related and may all contribute to cancer risk, but body weight seems to have the strongest evidence linking it to cancer. But the links between body weight and cancer are complex and are not yet fully understood. For example, while studies have found that excess weight is linked with an increased risk of breast cancer in women after menopause, it does not seem to increase the risk of breast cancer before menopause. The timing of weight gain might also affect cancer risk. Clearly, more research is needed to better define the links between body weight and cancer. How might body weight affect cancer risk? Excess body weight may affect cancer risk through a number of mechanisms, some of which might be specific to certain cancer types. Does losing weight reduce cancer risk? Research on how losing weight might lower the risk of developing cancer is limited. Still, there’s growing evidence that weight loss might reduce the risk of breast cancer (after menopause), more aggressive forms of prostate cancer, and possibly other cancers, too.


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Breast Cancer Survivors Shed 44 Pounds in 5 Months


SAN ANTONIO, Texas — A small cohort of 24 postmenopausal breast cancer survivors with an average body weight of 220 pounds lost an average 44 pounds during a 5-month period with a low-carbohydrate, calorie-restricted dietary intervention, according to a poster presentation here at the 36th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS). "It's remarkable weight loss," said Nicki Simone, MD, from Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, who was not involved in the study and was asked to comment. Weight loss is important in these postmenopausal women because obesity has been associated with decreased breast cancer–free survival and overall survival, said Dr. The product, Ideal Protein, is commercially available and was chosen in part because of its convenient packaging that promotes compliance, said Dr. The weight loss was accompanied by rapid and significant reductions in serum hormonal levels and serum inflammatory markers, reported the study authors. "It's great that they are studying weight loss," said Jennifer Ligabell, MD, from Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. "But rapid weight loss programs are associated with weight re-gain over time," she told Medscape Medical News. The study design was based in phases. "It was crazy awesome to see the women lose that much weight." The women in the new study had early-stage, estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer, were an average age of 67 years, and were all being treated at the Avera Cancer Institute. During the 19-week period, the mean weight loss was 19.9% of total body weight, or the equivalent of 43.7 pounds. The authors chose to evaluate metabolic markers during the study period because elevated estradiol levels, hyperinsulinemia, and increased inflammatory mediators are all associated with poorer breast cancer outcomes in postmenopausal women in other research.


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Breast Cancer Topic : Weight loss


Have been at 140 lbs for the last 20 years at least, very stable. Jul 31, 2011 07:07 PM - edited Aug 1, 2011 02:27 AM by Luan. Jennyboog NC Joined: Aug 2010 Posts: 1,262. Jul 31, 2011 08:20 PM Luan wrote: Aug 1, 2011 12:20 PM pip57 wrote:  "Have you lost any unexpected weight lately?"  I actually see her tomorrow and will see what she says. I suppose thats not considered rapid weight loss,  However, I do eat, and you all know I have my glass of wine with dinner, and I only get in about 3 days a week of excersise. My Bs did ask me last time I saw her,  to stop loosing weight,  I told her I was not trying, What do you ladie's think the lack of appetite is? All that you have been through, your just not hungry right now. Make shakes or force yourself to munch on something , it does not have to be alot,  you just don't want your Immune system to get low, take your vit D 3,  you have to take that with food for it to be affective! Love to all, I guess this is not the worst problem to have! Sherri, thanks so much for all that info, I did for a while have that flank pain you describe on the left side, gotta check if the gallbladder is on that side Lol lol, but it seems to have disappeared, I thought it was my kidney, had an abdominal scan, nothing showed up. Have the feeling it's not normal, because I've been so stable throughout treatments even. Mymountain Joined: Aug 2008 Posts: 181. Aug 1, 2011 09:12 PM mymountain wrote:


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Rapid Weight Loss 2016 - Reviewed and Ranked


Top Consumer Reviews.com has scoured the internet and found several rapid weight loss diets.  How fast can you expect to lose weight with the plan? Top Consumer Reviews.com has reviewed and ranked the best rapid weight loss diets available today. Published:  Fri, 08 Apr 2016 09:44:00 GMT. Published:  Fri, 08 Apr 2016 09:32:00 GMT. I was meeting with one of my weight loss groups participating in the study at Stanford I am working on, and one participant opened up that he is struggling. Published:  Thu, 07 Apr 2016 13:03:00 GMT. Published:  Fri, 08 Apr 2016 03:59:00 GMT. Published:  Thu, 07 Apr 2016 21:57:00 GMT. Published:  Fri, 08 Apr 2016 07:01:00 GMT. Published:  Fri, 08 Apr 2016 08:12:00 GMT. Exercise: Which is better for weight loss? Published:  Thu, 07 Apr 2016 20:31:00 GMT. To help balance hormones in the body and maximize weight loss, Diet Doc now offers prescription hormones for weight loss with their doctor supervised diet plans. Published:  Fri, 08 Apr 2016 07:04:00 GMT.


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