Potential complications from weight loss surgery include all of the following except


Common Postoperative Complications. Surgery Information


Postoperative complications may either be general or specific to the type of surgery undertaken and should be managed with the patient's history in mind. The highest incidence of postoperative complications is between one and three days after the operation. Primary haemorrhage: either starting during surgery or following postoperative increase in blood pressure - replace blood loss and may require return to theatre to re-explore the wound. Late postoperative haemorrhage occurs several days after surgery and is usually due to infection damaging vessels at the operation site. Treat the infection and consider exploratory surgery. Respiratory complications occur after major surgery, particularly after general anaesthesia and can include : DVT and pulmonary embolism are major causes of complications and death after surgery.[ 13 ][ 14 ] This may be caused by antibiotics, obstructive jaundice and surgery to the aorta. Temporary disruption of peristalsis: the patient may complain of nausea, anorexia and vomiting and it usually appears with the re-introduction of fluids. It involves the large bowel and is usually described as pseudo-obstruction. It may settle with nasogastric aspiration plus IV fluids or progress and require surgery. It usually resolves with IV fluids and delayed oral intake but may need surgery.[ 18 ]


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Side Effects of Chemotherapy


Side Effects of Chemotherapy. Your health care team can help you prevent or treat many side effects. Preventing and treating side effects is now an important part of cancer treatment. Tell your doctor about all the side effects you notice. Chemotherapy can damage the cells inside the mouth and throat. Whether you have these side effects, and how much, depends on the specific drugs and dose. Learn more about managing nervous system side effects . Learn more about  managing sexual and reproductive side effects . Your doctor can predict the risk of hair loss based on the drugs and doses you are receiving. Your health care team can help you treat long-term side effects and watch for late effects.


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Long - Term Effects of Bariatric Surgery


Long-Term Effects of Bariatric Surgery. | By Gianna Rose. Bariatric surgery can have long-term effects. Bariatric surgery alters the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract to cause weight loss. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, or AAFP, studies have shown that bariatric surgery can lead to weight loss that can be maintained long-term, and that it can cure conditions related to obesity such as sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes. Bariatric surgery causes weight loss by reducing the size of the stomach to restrict food intake, and, in gastric bypass surgery, also causing food to bypass part of the intestines to reduce absorption of calories.


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What are potential complications of cataract surgery


If you select "Keep me signed in on this computer", you can stay signed in to Web MD.com on this computer for up to 2 weeks or until you sign out. This means that a cookie will stay on your computer even when you exit or close your browser which may reduce your levels of privacy and security. If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to Web MD Experts and Contributors. Your ophthalmologist will discuss the specific potential complications of the procedure that are unique to your eye prior to having you sign a consent form. In some cases, within months to years after surgery, the thin lens capsule may become cloudy, and you may have the sensation that the cataract is returning because your vision is becoming blurry again. This procedure takes only a few minutes in the office, and vision usually improves rapidly.


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Surgery for Weight Loss : What Are the Options


Does Insurance Pay for Weight Loss Surgery? If weight loss surgery is covered by the insurance policy. If a coinsurance or deductible payment for the weight loss surgery is required by the patient. Types of Weight Loss Surgery. The three most common types of weight loss surgery are the Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, the Adjustable Gastric Band, and the Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy. Gastric bypass surgery will require one to two days stay in the hospital. The port is implanted in the skin during the surgery and is attached to the gastric band. Adjustable gastric band surgery is a reversible procedure, and is considered the least invasive of all of the weight loss surgeries. Patients who are compliant with instructions on diet can usually lose between 30 and 40 percent of excess weight with the gastric band procedure. Weight loss is slower with gastric band surgery and it may take up to five years for complete weight loss. Complications with adjustable gastric band surgery may include band slippage, band erosion into the stomach, and port-related problems, such as bleeding or infection. In vertical sleeve gastrectomy, at least 85 percent of the stomach is removed during surgery. Dieticians specialized in meal planning for bariatric surgery patients will consult with patients after surgery and throughout the weight loss period. Risks Associated with Weight Loss Surgery. Weight loss surgical procedures require major surgery and may be associated with significant risks.


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The Neurological Complications of Nutritional Deficiency


Neurologic complications of bariatric surgery have become increasingly recognized with the rising numbers of procedures and the increasing prevalence of obesity in the US. Deficits are most commonly seen with thiamine, vitamin B 12, folate, vitamin D, vitamin E, and copper deficiencies. The most commonly described nutritional deficiencies include thiamine (B 1), B 12, folate, vitamin D, vitamin E, and copper deficiencies [ 3 ]. Folate deficiency has been associated with peripheral neuropathy and myelopathy [ 23 ]. Severe vitamin E deficiency has been associated with sensory axonopathy, radiculopathies, and peripheral neuropathies. Optic neuropathy is often associated with copper and B 12 deficiencies and has been reported to present 1.5–3 years after surgery [ 3 , 8 , 11 , 33 ]. Myelopathy in the setting of nutritional deficiency is commonly seen and frequently can be one of the most debilitating problems associated with bariatric surgery. It is often attributed to B 12 deficiency but has also been associated with copper, folate, and vitamin E deficiencies [ 8 , 11 , 36 ]. Vitamin deficiencies most commonly associated with peripheral neuropathies are vitamin B 1, vitamin B 6, vitamin B 12, vitamin E, and copper [ 3 , 11 ]. Nutritional supplementation may only be partially helpful in improving the symptoms of malabsorption of vitamin B 12, thiamine, and vitamin E [ 3 , 8 ]. The development of these associated symptoms is not uncommon, and it is therefore important to discuss the potential for these complications with patients. Mac Lean, “Vitamin and mineral supplementation after gastric bypass,” in Update: Surgery for the Morbidly Obese Patient, M.


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Type 1 Diabetes Complications


Type 1 diabetes is complicated—and if you don’t manage it properly, there are complications, both short-term and long-term. “If you don’t manage it properly” is an important if statement: by carefully managing your blood glucose levels, you can stave off or prevent the short- and long-term complications. And if you’ve already developed diabetes complications, controlling your blood glucose levels can help you manage the symptoms and prevent further damage. Diabetes complications are all related to poor blood glucose control, so you must work carefully with your doctor and diabetes team to correctly manage your blood sugar (or your child’s blood sugar). Check the blood glucose level: If it’s above 250mg/dl, you have very high blood sugar (blood glucose), and it’s quite possible that you have diabetic ketoacidosis. By tightly controlling your blood glucose level (or your child’s blood glucose level), you can avoid long-term complications of type 1 diabetes. Uncontrolled blood glucose can, over time, damage the body’s tiny and large blood vessels. Type 1 diabetes can also affect the large blood vessels, causing plaque to eventually build up and potentially leading to a heart attack. These are the main complications, both short-term and long-term, that are associated with type 1 diabetes. By carefully controlling your blood glucose, you can prevent these complications.


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Medical Policy


There are a variety of surgical procedures and other treatment modalities intended for the treatment of clinically severe obesity. Gastric bypass and gastric restrictive procedures with a Roux-en-Y procedure up to 150 cm, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (for example, the Lap-Band® System or the REALIZE™ Adjustable Gastric Band), vertical banded gastroplasty, biliopancreatic bypass with duodenal switch, and sleeve gastrectomy (open or laparoscopic) are considered medically necessary for the treatment of clinically severe obesity for selected adults (18 years and older) who meet ALL the following criteria (1, 2, and 3): These efforts must be fully appraised and documented by the physician requesting authorization for surgery; AND. Repeat surgical procedures for revision or conversion to another surgical procedure (that is also considered medically necessary within this document) for inadequate weight loss, (that is, unrelated to a surgical complication of a prior procedure) are considered medically necessary when all the following criteria are met: The individual continues to meet ALL the medical necessity criteria for bariatric surgery (see Criteria 1 thru 3);  and. Stretching of a stomach pouch formed by a previous gastric bypass/restrictive surgery, due to overeating, does not constitute a surgical complication and the revision of this condition is considered not medically necessary. Investigational and Not Medically Necessary: Gastric bypass and gastric restrictive procedures with a Roux-en-Y procedure up to 150 cm, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (for example, the Lap-Band® System or the REALIZE™ Adjustable Gastric Band), vertical banded gastroplasty, biliopancreatic bypass with duodenal switch, and sleeve gastrectomy (open or laparoscopic) are considered investigational and not medically necessary when the above criteria are not met. Bariatric surgical procedures including, but not limited to, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding are considered investigational and not medically necessary for individuals with a BMI of 30-34.9 kg/m². Malabsorptive procedures including, but not limited to, jejunoileal bypass, biliopancreatic bypass without duodenal switch, or very long limb (greater than 150 cm) gastric bypass (other than the biliopancreatic bypass with duodenal switch) are considered investigational and not medically necessary as a treatment of clinically severe obesity. Repeat procedures for repair, revision, or conversion to another surgical procedure following a gastric bypass or gastric restrictive procedure are considered investigational and not medically necessary when the criteria listed above are not met.  The mean BMI was 46.9 ± 09.9 kg/m(2) for those undergoing VBG and 46.7 ± 07.8 kg/m(2) for those in the AGB group.  The 30-day mortality rate was 0.4% for VBG and 0.2% for AGB.  The overall re-intervention rate in the long-term was 49.7% for VBG and 8.6% for AGB (p.


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Weight Loss Agents - Risks Of Surgery


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Abdominoplasty Following Massive Weight


Patients who experience massive weight loss are left with disfiguring skin laxity that warrants surgical excision of the redundant tissue. In particular, the groin flap or cross-abdominal flap or both are presented as options for the postbypass patient in whom subcostal and midline scarring is present. 25 , 26 In the experience of the authors, transverse incisions are most appropriate in the patient with massive weight loss. These abdominal wall maneuvers are less important in the patient with a persistent thick pannus. This maneuver is rare in the weight loss patient as it further compromises blood supply and because of the frequent presence of a midline scar. There are several justifications for a true abdominoplasty in the patient with massive weight loss. Removal of the abdominal pannus is perhaps the primary concern of a patient with severe skin laxity after massive weight loss. Raising and advancing the abdominal flap leave the patient with a far more appealing result compared with a simple panniculectomy. Downward traction on the superior flap and upward traction on the inferior flap with the patient on a flat operating table are the best way to determine the maximum amount to be excised. 36 In the nonobese patient with a thin pannus and laxity of the abdominal skin, a traditional abdominoplasty is the preferred treatment. The patient with a thick abdominal pannus despite undergoing massive weight loss presents a more challenging problem. The patient who has sustained subcostal incisions as for previous open cholecystectomy and then midline incision is in special jeopardy for flap loss (Fig. As before, the previous scar is excised and the defect is filled with a rotational flap based on the left superior epigastric artery. The high-lateral tension abdominoplasty for patients with moderate to severe laxity of abdominal skin, fat, and muscle provides a modest amount of tightening of the buttocks, upper thighs, groin, and trunk in one operation. Liposuction of the hips and greater trochanters, however, is common and may be combined with any of the preceding procedures.


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Flashcards about Nutrition Exam 4


Which of the following foods is recommended for a high protein diet- Diet manuals include all of the following except- The most appropriate response by the nurse would be what- The appropriate diet today would be what- Which of the following nutritional interventions is most appropriate for a patient in a coma- Aspiration risk is high for all of the following except- Medical nutrition therapy for COPD include all of the following except- Dry mouth can result in all of the following except what- Dysphagia can be caused by all of the following except what- Which of the following foods would not be appropriate on a level 1 diet for dysphagia- Constipation may be caused by all of the following except what- Which of the following would be recommended for an infant with cystic fibrosis-


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Laparoscopic Weight Loss Surgery - A SAGES


WHAT ARE THE ADVANTAGES OF THE LAPAROSCOPIC OBESITY SURGERY? A written consent for surgery will be needed after the surgeon reviews the potential risks and benefits of the operation. The day prior to surgery, you will begin a clear liquid diet. WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT THE DAY OF SURGERY? You will arrive at the hospital the morning of the operation. You will meet the anesthesiologist and discuss the anesthesia. Most patients stay in the hospital the night of surgery and may require additional hospital days to recover from the surgery. WHAT ARE THE EXPECTED RESULTS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC OBESITY SURGERY? Weight loss generally continues for all the procedures for 18-24 months after surgery. Complication rates with secondary surgery are higher than after the first operation. Following obesity surgery, patients must re-orient themselves and adjust to the effect of a changing body image. You will usually be in the hospital 1 to 3 days after a laparoscopic procedure. You should be out of bed, sitting in a chair the night of surgery and walking by the following day. On the first of second day after surgery you may have an X-ray of your stomach.


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Bariatric surgery Risks - Mayo Clinic


American Gastroenterological Association. American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement on obesity. Bariatric surgery for severe obesity. Surgical management of severe obesity. Complications of bariatric surgery. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery medical guidelines for clinical practice for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient. Obesity. Collazo-Clavell ML (expert opinion). Rochester, Minn. Sarr MG (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.


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Caring for Patients After Bariatric Surgery


Caring for Patients After Bariatric Surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to sustainable long-term weight loss and may be curative for such obesity-related comorbidities as diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea in severely obese patients. The Rouxen-Y gastric bypass has become the most common procedure for patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Some of the common short-term complications of bariatric surgery are wound infection, stomal stenosis, marginal ulceration, and constipation. 3 A number of studies 4 – 6 have demonstrated that bariatric surgery leads to sustainable long-term weight loss and, in many patients, may be curative for obesity-related comorbidities such as diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. As more patients have bariatric surgery, it is important for the family physician to be knowledgeable about the risks and benefits of the procedure and to understand the complexities of the lifelong medical surveillance that these patients require. The Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) has become the most commonly performed procedure for patients undergoing bariatric surgery. 8   Potential candidates for bariatric surgery should be selected carefully based on the criteria in Table 2 8 and only after a thorough multidisciplinary evaluation. The International Bariatric Surgery Registry was founded in 1986 and provides data on 35,000 patients. Some common short-term complications of bariatric surgery are wound infections, stomal stenosis (i.e., narrowing of the gastrojejunostomy), marginal ulceration, and constipation. Lifestyle, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk factors 10 years after bariatric surgery. Analysis of the incidence and risk factors for wound infections in open bariatric surgery. Characterizing the performance and outcomes of obesity surgery in California.


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Losing Weight After Gastric Bypass Surgery


Losing Weight After Gastric Bypass Surgery. How Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass Surgery Helps You Lose Weight. Think of gastric bypass as a tool to help you lose weight and eat healthier foods. Obesity and these other conditions can increase complications of both the surgery and anesthesia. Gastric bypass, sleeve gastrectomy and adjustable gastric banding are NOT cosmetic surgery. If you are able, you will be helped to sit up in a chair several hours after you wake up from surgery, which will also help your lungs. A leak or rupture where the intestine is joined to the stomach after gastric bypass or vertical sleeve gastrectomy is serious and may require an immediate return to the operating room to be corrected. On the morning after surgery, you may have an x-ray test called a gastrograffin swallow, to make sure there is no leak. After surgery, you may be constipated. Also, inflatable boots, elastic stockings and frequent walking after surgery help to decrease the risk of blood clots. Bleeding during or after the surgery is a complication. If bleeding occurs, blood transfusion, re-operation, and potentially removal of the spleen may be required. The adjustable gastric band can slip years after surgery which may require surgery to replace it in proper position. The tubing or the port can get infected which may require removal of the port and the band.


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Pregnancy complications


Complications of pregnancy are health problems that occur during pregnancy. Other problems arise during the pregnancy . Seizures during pregnancy can harm the fetus, and increase the risk of miscarriage or stillbirth . HIV can be passed from a woman to her baby during pregnancy or delivery. Some STIs also can be passed from a woman to her baby during pregnancy or delivery. The health of the mother and baby are closely watched to make sure high blood pressure is not preeclampsia. Preeclampsia (pree-ee-CLAMP-see-uh) – A condition starting after 20 weeks of pregnancy that causes high blood pressure and problems with the kidneys and other organs. But some infections can be harmful to your pregnancy, your baby, or both. Learn the symptoms and what you can do to keep healthy. The flu shot given during pregnancy is safe and has been shown to protect both the mother and her baby (up to 6 months old) from flu. This raises the risk of miscarriage during the first 20 weeks of pregnancy.


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Cirrhosis Complications - Mayo Clinic


The liver. The liver is your largest internal organ. A wide range of diseases and conditions can damage the liver and lead to cirrhosis. Fat accumulating in the liver (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease) Copper accumulated in the liver (Wilson's disease) Cirrhosis slows the normal flow of blood through the liver, thus increasing pressure in the vein that brings blood from the intestines and spleen to the liver. Swelling in the legs and abdomen. Edema and ascites also may result from the inability of the liver to make enough of certain blood proteins, such as albumin. A liver damaged by cirrhosis isn't able to clear toxins from the blood as well as a healthy liver can. Liver cirrhosis. Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis. Nutrition and exercise in the management of liver cirrhosis. Hepatic inflammation and progressive liver fibrosis in chronic liver disease.


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Management of Complications After GI Weight Loss Surgery


Obes Surg 2009;19:153–157. Obes Surg 2011;21:413–420. Obes Surg 2003;13: 62–65. Obes Surg 2007;17:1261–1267. Obes Surg 2005;15:342–345. Obes Surg 2005;15:1375– 1378. Obes Surg 2004;14:407–414. Obes Surg 2005;15:820–826. Obes Surg 1998;8:467– 474. Obes Surg 2008;18:1083–1088.


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Effects of Uncontrolled Diabetes


Over time, high blood sugar levels can harm your nerves. It can also affect your hands and other body parts. Autonomic neuropathy stems from damage to the nerves that control your internal organs. The good news: You have many options to treat your pain. He might suggest you use a device that stimulates your nerves called TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation). The good news: If you keep your blood sugar under control, visit your dentist regularly, and take good care of your teeth each day, you can avoid gum problems and tooth loss. But the most important ways to slow diabetes complications are to keep your blood sugar levels under control, eat right, exercise, avoid smoking, and get high blood pressure and high cholesterol treated.


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Gastrointestinal Complications of Obesity Surgery


One of the most common complications causing nausea and vomiting in gastric bypass patients is anastomotic ulcers, with and without stomal stenosis. Stomal stenosis after gastric bypass may respond to endoscopic dilation with through-the-scope balloon dilators and, thus, may obviate the need for surgical revision. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Outcomes after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity. Laparoscopic gastric bypass, Roux-en-Y- 500 patients: technique and results, with 3-60 month follow-up. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding: complications and side effects responsible for the poor long-term outcome. Endoscopic findings and their clinical correlations in patients with symptoms after gastric bypass surgery. Prevalence and treatment of gallstones after gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity. Incidence and outcome of anastomotic stricture after laparoscopic gastric bypass.


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Weight - Loss Surgery : Risks and Complications


Home > weight-loss surgery risks and complications. Weight-Loss Surgery: Risks and Complications. Your Guide to a Safe and Healthy Bariatric Surgery. The most severe complications that may occur with bariatric surgery include intestinal leakage, internal bleeding, pulmonary embolus, and, although very rare, death. We have been able to minimize the frequency and severity of both major and minor complications by: The following is a list of possible side-effects and complications to consider before having weight-loss surgery. Anastomotic leak (leak from a connection made to the bowel, usually requires re-operation and long hospital stay) Bleeding and the potential need for blood transfusion. Blood transfusion carries the risk of infection with bacteria, parasites (malaria), and viruses (hepatitis, HIV/AIDS). Pneumonia, lung infection and fluid around the lungs (pleural effusion)


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Postoperative Nursing Care of Gastric


Discuss the postoperative nursing care for bariatric patients. Use of the reverse Trendelenburg position may improve oxygenation in patients with morbid obesity. Increases in total blood volume and resting cardiac output are characteristics of patients with morbid obesity; stroke volume is the factor that increases (cardiac output = stroke volume x heart rate). Because of the increased workload on the heart (and the potential for hypoxia), postoperative gastric bypass patients are at risk for acute myocardial ischemia, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, and sudden cardiac death. Obscured anatomical landmarks and variation of the depth needed for insertion of central venous catheters for vascular access are challenges in patients with morbid obesity. Critically ill postoperative patients are at high risk for venous thromboembolism and subsequent pulmonary embolism associated with immobility, venous stasis, and the relatively hypercoagulable state. The preferred route of administration of pharmacological agents for patients with morbid obesity is the intravenous route. Patients with morbid obesity are at high risk for skin breakdown and delayed wound healing because of the decreased vascularity in adipose tissue. Among the greatest challenges in caring for patients with morbid obesity who are undergoing bariatric surgery are the psychosocial needs that arise. Commitment of patients and the healthcare team is essential for positive outcomes. Recognition and identification of unique nursing considerations and use of critical thinking skills to best meet the needs of postoperative gastric bypass patients are vital. The challenges to the healthcare team are to be knowledgeable of bariatric operations and complications and to plan carefully for the care of bariatric patients to achieve optimal outcomes. As more patients choose gastric bypass surgery for treatment of morbid obesity, the expertise of critical care, progressive care, and general care nurses most likely will have great impact in the postoperative outcomes of these patients.


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Pathophysiology Exam 2 - Part A Flashcards


B) night sweats, low-grade fevers, and weight loss. B - night sweats, low-grade fevers, and weight loss. A) NHL will often spread to the nasopharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and bone. A - NHL will often spread to the nasopharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and bone. B) Epitaxis, gum bleeding, and petechiae. B - Epitaxis, gum bleeding, and petechiae. B) Weight loss and enlarged thyroid gland. B - Weight loss and enlarged thyroid gland. B - Degenerative changes in the muscle and orbital edema. A) hypotension and bradycardia leading to shock. D) fever and tachycardia leading to high-output heart failure. D - fever and tachycardia leading to high-output heart failure. Low levels of thyroid hormone (T 3 and T 4) and high levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) are indicative of: Alterations in lipid and protein metabolism lead to chronic complications of DM through which of the following processes?


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What are the potential complications of surgery for


Web MD Answers. If you don't find your answer, you can post your question to Web MD Experts and Contributors. On Web MD: Important: The opinions expressed in Web MD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or Web MD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of Web MD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a Web MD physician or any member of the Web MD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Do not consider Web MD User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read on Web MD.


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Preventing surgical site infections after bariatric


This paper reviews the surgical site infections (SSIs) that occur post bariatric surgery and SSI prevention. This paper sets out to define different types of SSIs that occur following bariatric surgery and to discuss existing literature on the critical aspects of SSI prevention and the appropriate use of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis for bariatric surgery. The reported incidence of SSIs following bariatric surgery is approximately 15% [ 9 ], which is similar to the rate of SSI for obese patients undergoing nonbariatric abdominal surgeries [ 10 ]. Obese patients have decreased tissue oxygen tension at, and near, the incision site, which increases the risk for SSI [ 25 ]. Conducted a retrospective review addressing the incidence of and risk factors for SSI in 269 patients undergoing open bariatric surgery. Most of these recommendations for the prevention of SSIs apply to bariatric surgery. The cephamycins are a unique group of cephalosporins with good activity against anaerobic organisms and they are frequently used as prophylactic agents in bariatric surgery [ 40 ]. Table 1 summarizes the antimicrobial recommendations for bariatric surgical prophylaxis. As is the case for most procedures, the duration of antimicrobial prophylaxis for bariatric surgery should not exceed 24 h after surgery is completed [ 13 , 84 ]. Hence, the highest dose of prophylactic antimicrobial agent that can be safely administered should be used for bariatric surgical prophylaxis. The duration of antimicrobial prophylaxis for bariatric surgery should not exceed 24 h after surgery is completed.


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Side effects of diabetes


Heart disease and blood vessel disease are common problems for many people who don’t have their diabetes under control. You're at least twice as likely to have heart problems and strokes as people who don’t have the condition. Problems with large blood vessels in your legs can cause leg cramps, changes in skin color, and less sensation. The good news: Many studies show that controlling your diabetes can help you avoid these problems, or stop them from getting worse if you have them. Symptoms: Vision problems, sight loss, or pain in your eye if you have diabetes-related eye disease. Symptoms: You might not notice any problems with early diabetes-related kidney disease. The good news: Drugs that lower blood pressure (even if you don't have high blood pressure ) can cut your risk of kidney failure by 33%.


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Surgery After Significant Weight Loss l Cleveland Clinic


Patient is shown before surgery after significant weight loss (left) and after surgery (right). Am I candidate for surgery after significant weight loss? The best way to determine if you are a candidate for surgery after significant weight loss is through a thorough consultation with a plastic surgeon at Cleveland Clinic Cosmetic & Plastic Surgery Center. How do I prepare for surgery after significant weight loss? Preparing for surgery after significant weight loss at Cleveland Clinic Cosmetic & Plastic Surgery Center includes discussing a number of questions about your health, desires and lifestyle with your plastic surgeon, including: There are a variety of body contouring procedures that can treat your needs after significant weight loss. The areas of the body that are most often treated through body contouring after significant weight loss include: The exact procedures to be performed at one time will be individualized to your needs through a thorough consultation with a plastic surgeon at Cleveland Clinic Cosmetic & Plastic Surgery Center. The results of body contouring surgery after significant weight loss are visible almost immediately. Follow-up with an expert at Cleveland Clinic Cosmetic & Plastic Surgery Center is the best way to ensure long-lasting results from your body contouring procedures. Following your body contouring procedure(s) after significant weight loss, dressings or bandages will be applied to the incisions. Is surgery after significant weight loss safe? If you're considering body contouring surgery after significant weight loss, look for a plastic surgeon with specialized training and significant experience performing these procedures. Like all cosmetic procedures, body contouring surgery after significant weight loss is not typically covered by health insurance.


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Gastric Bypass Surgery Procedure


Gastric bypass surgery, a type of bariatric surgery (weight loss surgery), is a procedure that alters the process of digestion. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is the most commonly performed bariatric procedure. A biliopancreatic diversion is primarily malabsorptive, and is a more complicated procedure than the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. What are the risks of gastric bypass surgery? Almost 85 percent of patients who have gastric bypass surgery will experience this syndrome after the procedure. Your physician will explain the procedure to you and offer you the opportunity to ask any questions that you might have about the procedure. You will be asked to sign a consent form that gives your physician permission to perform the procedure. Gastric bypass surgery requires a stay in the hospital. For an open procedure, the abdominal muscles will be separated and the abdominal cavity will be opened. For a laparoscopic procedure, the physician will insert the laparoscope and other small instruments. For a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, the physician will staple the stomach across the top to create a new small pouch for a stomach. After the procedure, you will be taken to the recovery room for observation. Before you are discharged from the hospital, arrangements will be made for a follow-up visit with your physician.


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