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Jillian Michaels’ Weight Loss Tips — ‘Biggest Loser


Jillian spilled her top weight loss tips to Hollywood Life.com EXCLUSIVELY — find out how you can boost your metabolism and lose weight by exercising just 30 minutes a day in our interview with the ‘Biggest Loser’ trainer below. 39-year-old personal trainer  Jillian Michaels  reveals that combining strength training with cardio exercises will build muscle and burn fat and lead you to your best body ever! She says, “I have created a cutting-edge total body workout featuring the Curves Circuit strength training machines in conjunction with functional bodyweight-based exercises that ramp up metabolism and transform physique.” Jillian says that her “30-minute workout will take your intensity to the next level to help you burn more calories and more fat, as well as build lean muscle and strength.” We can do all that in just 30 minutes? Every month, Jillian will bring out 12 new workout moves with the Circuit that’ll focus on important muscle groups in the body! Jillian says that we need to “focus on getting an effective and balanced workout that targets all major muscle group and keeps up the intensity.


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Biggest Loser’ winner admits she may have been 'too


Rachel Frederickson admits she may have been "a little too enthusiastic" about her weight loss on "The Biggest Loser." The 24-year-old shocked and disturbed some viewers when she revealed her drastic weight loss on the NBC reality show, after shedding 155 pounds — going from 260 down to 105. "Maybe I was a little too enthusiastic in my training to get to the finale," Frederickson told People magazine  in a new interview. Her new size 0-2 frame proved to be the most dramatic transformation of the night, but Frederickson assured that she didn't compromise her health in the process. Producers also say Frederickson was "carefully monitored" throughout her seven-month journey, including the days leading up to the big finale. The ‘Biggest Loser’ winner has been facing backlash about her ‘underweight’ frame after losing over 155 pounds on the show.


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BIGGEST LOSER - whose lost the most weight in all seasons


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Weight Loss


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The truth about Wii and weight loss


The truth about Wii and weight loss. But can the new generation of ‘active’ computer games really help you lose weight? In addition, the ACE study found that the energy used for the Wii activities was unimpressive – when compared to the real thing. It concluded that “the energy used when playing active Wii Sports games was not of high enough intensity to contribute towards the recommended daily amount of exercise in children”. Well, if you use the Wii Fit during time that you’d normally be watching TV or surfing the net, the Wii is good news. His study attempted to replicate the average family’s use of a Wii to see if their fitness improved. Their fitness was measured at the beginning and end of that period. So, if the result was due to people not using it, rather than the game itself, can the Wii be used to help weight loss? That means if you use the Wii to help put your energy equation into deficit, you will lose weight. And remember Wii Fit and Wii Sport are not the only fitness games that will work with the Wii console and balance board.


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How To Lose Weight Fast and Safely - WebMD


Let me save you some time: skip the fad diets . You can safely lose 3 or more pounds a week at home with a healthy diet and lots of exercise , says weight loss counselor Katherine Tallmadge, RD. If you burn 500 more calories than you eat every day for a week, you should lose about 1-2 pounds. If you want to lose weight faster, you'll need to eat less and exercise more. For instance, if you take in 1,050 to 1,200 calories a day, and exercise for one hour per day, you could lose 3-5 pounds in the first week, or more if you weigh more than 250 pounds. "When you reduce sodium and cut starches, you reduce fluids and fluid retention, which can result in up to 5 pounds of fluid loss when you get started," says Michael Dansinger, MD, of NBC's The Biggest Loser show. Diets for Fast Weight Loss. Stay busy - you don't want to eat just because you're bored. "Even if you write it down on a napkin and end up throwing it away, the act of writing it down is about being accountable to yourself and is a very effective tool for weight loss," says Bonnie Taub Dix, MA, RD, author of Read It Before You Eat It .


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The Biggest Loser - Wikipedia, the


The Biggest Loser (Australian TV series) The Biggest Loser. The Biggest Loser House (Season 8-Present) Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia (season 1) Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia (season 2) Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia (season 3) Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia: Couples. Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia: Couples 2. Biggest Loser Season 5 was the second series to feature couples. The sixth season of the series, The Biggest Loser Australia: Families , began airing on 30 January 2011. Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia: Singles. The seventh season of the series, The Biggest Loser Australia: Singles, began airing on 23 January 2012. The 2014 season started on 19 January. Main article: The Biggest Loser Australia 2015: Families.


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The Biggest Loser Diet - Intensive Dietary Management


The Biggest Loser Diet scored #3 under the Best Weight Loss category. All the ‘experts’ recommend this weight loss regimen. Much of the weight lost was fat, not muscle. So, essentially the Biggest Loser diet is Caloric Reduction and Increased Exercise. The Biggest Loser is simply Eat Less Move More on mega doses of steroids. Why do all the Eat Less Move More patients gain all their weight back after 6 months? As you start burning less energy at rest and burn less energy doing exercise, you get the very familiar weight plateau. Once expenditure drops below intake, you start the even more familiar weight regain. By six months, the Biggest Loser group had significantly dropped their metabolic rate. The point, of course, is that Calories Out is the far more important and decisive factor. The Biggest Loser diet is the bigger badass brother of Eat Less, Move More. The Biggest Loser – Proven failure on steroids. Share the post "The Biggest Loser Diet – Eat Less Move More’s Bigger Badass Brother – Fasting 22"


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The Biggest Loser ' Has Big Problems, Health Experts Say


A biggest loser contestant during a weigh-in, which helps determine who stays and who is booted off the show. NBC's "The Biggest Loser" is all about records. But physicians and nutritionists worry the show's focus on competitive weight loss is, at best, counterproductive and, at worst, dangerous. The show's producers point out that contestants are under medical supervision and say the extreme nature of the competition is inspirational for viewers. And of course, there are serious health risks to being as obese as the Biggest Loser contestants. The risks become more pronounced as the obesity becomes more severe, and losing weight is a very good idea, said Wolin-Riklin ¬— if done right. "The way I go about encouraging healthful weight loss is by working on changes one at a time," she said. But weight loss on "The Biggest Loser" is far removed from weight loss in the real world. And then there's the exercise program. Regaining the weight. Several former Biggest Loser contestants have regained some or all of the weight, which doesn't surprise Kushner.


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10 Tidbits of Weight Loss Wisdom from The Biggest Loser


I Am "The Biggest Loser"? For the uninitiated, here's the skinny on this obsessively watchable tubecast: Between 12 (in season one) and 14 (in seasons two and three) overweight contestants compete to see who can lose the most weight in a six-month stint. One person is voted off the ranch every episode. The prize: $250,000, baby! The lesson: Be your own high-stepping, baton-twirling majorette. The lesson: Make sure your perception of how you look matches with reality. The lesson: Why compare your butt to anyone else's? Applaud yourself for rejecting the bait, and harness that footwork whenever you feel weak. After packing on three pounds in one week, he had to confess to himself — and his food diary — that a series of late-night feeding sessions was the culprit, not water retention. The lesson: Be real with yourself, because the scale does not lie. The lesson: You can't serve your body and the bar tab, too. The lesson: You can indulge without cupboard fever. The lesson: Expert coaching aside, you must find your own motivation, a catalyst to make you move every day.


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Ask the Diet Doctor : Is Losing 10 Pounds a


A: When it comes to weight loss and safety, the difference between safe and unsafe doesn't have to do with how much you lose but how you lose it. If you drink nothing but lemon juice and maple syrup with a dash of cayenne pepper for a week and lose 10 pounds, I would consider that unsafe weight loss. On the other hand, if you complete three intense, metabolic resistance-training sessions , another three interval-training sessions , and you are diligent about eating a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate diet and lose 10 pounds in one week; I wouldn't say that was unsafe. I would say you worked hard and lost the weight the right way. I should note that 11 pounds is the most weight I have ever had a client lose in one week (not counting athletes that were cutting weight). How much weight do you have to lose? If you weigh 180 pounds and your goal weight is 130 pounds, losing 20 pounds in one week—the right way—teeters on the brink of impossible. If you're more like a Biggest Loser contestant, weighing 380 pounds, then losing 20 pounds in one week is plausible (especially considering the large amount of water weight you would lose during the first week). This follows the general rule that the more weight you have to lose, the easier it will be for you to lose weight. All of this aside, the most important questions are why do you need to lose so much weight so fast, and what is going to happen afterwards? The bottom line: I have found that the faster you lose weight, the faster you gain it back.


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Biggest Loser's Rachel Frederickson sparks health fears


She started the show off at 260lbs but it was an unrecognisable Rachel Frederickson who was crowned champion of The Biggest Loser on Tuesday after losing almost 60 per cent of her body weight. And she wasn't the only one, as viewers took to Twitter to share their thoughts, labelling the weight loss 'dangerous' and 'sad'. Their shock at the huge loss was clear for all to see and it was quickly echoed by viewers. A Times reported that Rachel insisted she ate 'no more than 1600 calories a day' and ensured her drastic weight loss was achieved by healthy means. Rachel said she lost all her weight under the direct supervision of the show's medical experts and training staff. She had also insisted that her new confidence was more important than the title. Total transformation: The Biggest Loser winner Rachel was shown before and after on Tuesday during the show's finale. She did it: Confetti fell as Rachel was crowned The Biggest Loser. Delight: Despite the controversy, Rachel was thrilled with her achievement. And he insisted everyone on the show was already a winner.


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The Biggest Loser : Dangerous Weight Loss - Diet Blog


The Biggest Loser: Dangerous Weight Loss. Add some additional measures to the already-extreme methods imparted on TBL contestants and you have a recipe for a potentially dangerous situation. In the world of reality TV, drama matters – the more extreme the weight loss, the greater the drama, the greater the ratings. For the average Joe/Jane, the Biggest Loser ups the ante of weight loss expectation. Gallstones, nutritional imbalances, irritability and constipation are also common in very rapid weight loss over the course of several weeks. At the very least, extreme weight loss methods don’t last.


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Rachel Frederickson on Weight Loss and 'Hurtful' Comments


As one of the Today show's "2014 Voices," Frederickson penned a revealing blog post in which she opens up about how "hurtful" the negative comments were, and how they reminded her of what landed her at the Biggest Loser Ranch in the first place. "I started listening to a louder voice than my own, and in turn, I lost the person I loved being." This experience was repeated for Frederickson when, years later, she allowed other people's voices to affect her following her win. The comments were "hurtful," she writes, and "people tried to bring me down and [privately] succeeded." At the start of Frederickson's Biggest Loser journey, she weighed in at 260 lbs. Weight loss secured her the win, she was a size 0-2, which "shocked" her trainer, Dolvett Quince. FLASHBACK: The Biggest Loser Winner Was Shocked, Overwhelmed by Attention.


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I Lost Weight : Hannah Curlee Lost 120 Pounds On 'The


I Lost Weight: Hannah Curlee Lost 120 Pounds On 'The Biggest Loser' Before Weight: 248 pounds. How I Gained Weight: I was very active in high school. I gained 37 pounds in the first month. Depression and feeling sorry for myself led to over 100 pounds gained in the first year. My life revolved around food and trying unhealthy ways to lose weight. How I Lost It: Being chosen to be on "The Biggest Loser" was a life-changing experience. My sister and I have maintained our weight loss for two years! After Weight: 128 pounds. Weight Loss Success Stories.


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Biggest Loser 60 percent weight loss : Is it healthy


"The Biggest Loser" winner Rachel Fredrickson’s 155-pound weight loss is turning heads - but not all for the right reason. Fredrickson, 24, lost 59.62 percent of her body weight during the course of the show and won the $250,000 prize. While audiences applauded the contestants’ efforts, some critics said her weight loss journey may have gone too far. Hogan explained that it was also concerning that Fredrickson lost all the weight in a relatively short period of time. But Kylene Guerra, a nutritionist who does weight management at the Cleveland Clinic, explained to CBS News that it’s hard to tell if Fredrickson is actually unhealthy or not. Guerra said that if Fredrickson was eating 3,000 to 4,000 calories a day and not exercising, it would make sense she lost more weight than the recommended rate after being put on a healthy, calorie restricted diet and an extreme exercise routine. The fact that she was a high school swimmer could also have “put her mindset (to succeed) in a completely different place than other contestants.” Both experts said that with any rapid weight loss, there is a concern that the dieter would end up gaining the weight back. Hogan pointed out that many of the previous contestants on “The Biggest Loser” put on pounds after the show ended. They emphasized the need to make permanent lifestyle changes so you can keep the weight off long term. To help with limiting calories, Hogan said a food diary can make it clear what items in your diet are bad for you and what times of the day you are overeating.


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The Biggest Loser Pros and Cons : An In - Depth Review of


Home | FREE Preview | The Biggest Loser Pros And Cons: An . The Biggest Loser Pros And Cons: An In-Depth Review of Television's Most Popular Reality Show. I've known about The Biggest Loser since it debuted in 2005 because people ask me all the time what I think of the program and of course, "How do they lose so much weight?" Despite its worldwide popularity, The Biggest Loser is controversial and responses to the show are highly polarized. The mixed reviews for the show aren't surprising because The Biggest Loser clearly has pros and cons. The producers of The Biggest Loser have set up the conditions and environment with so much accountability, it's impossible for contestants not to lose weight. Because competition is motivating and competition brings out the best performances. The biggest loser is judged on weight loss, not body composition. The weight loss on The Biggest Loser is deceiving. Many of the contestants are losing muscle and other lean tissue. What's most alarming to me is that because the show is judged on weight loss, not body composition, contestants are penalized for gaining muscle and actually rewarded for losing muscle. The network, the trainers and other supporters of the show say they do not promote or endorse drugs or any unhealthy methods of weight loss. It was not the first time. The participants move out of their homes and onto The Biggest Loser "Ranch" where they have no job other than losing weight. In the real world, people who work out 4-6 hours a day for weight loss are not called inspirational and dedicated, they are called obsessive-compulsive or exercise anorexics.


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Lose It Fast, Lose It Forever : A 4


This book provides readers the details they need to create a healthy plan they can follow for the rest of their lives to lose weight, increase their fitness, and achieve the healthy lifestyle they desire. He believes that anyone who makes the mental commitment necessary to lose weight can achieve and maintain a healthy weight, whether they need to lose a hundred or more pounds or are looking to shed that pesky last ten. Pete Thomas breaks down how he got 400 pounds and the full journey it took (on the three levels it took) for him to get fit and healthy. Pete Thomas also lays out a path that anyone at any weight can follow to build the same healthy lifestyle he is maintaining. Pete Thomas points out that weight loss, real weight loss not the yo-yo thing most of us do, takes commitment to the process and journey of changing your life habits and not just a temporary fad. This book really challenges you to think and then respond to why you are not healthy and why you are choosing to stay that way. Yes, Pete Thomas tells you how he eats and works out to get and maintain his healthy lifestyle but he also tells you how you can adopt his principles into your life to have a similar lifestyle. If you are tired of not being healthy and are willing to go through the process of learning why you are not choosing to be healthy then this book is for you. Buy it today; get the express overnight and start reading and APPLYING this book to your life. Even if you never apply the knowledge of Pete Thomas to your life you will still learn more about weight loss and have a fun read, (I love the story about Jillian Michaels on day one of the ranch), then any of the millions of "Eat your vegetables and go for a walk" books out there.


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Organizing a Community Biggest Loser Weight Loss Challenge


The number of overweight and obese adolescents has increased from 5% in 1996 to 17% in 2004 (Sheehy & Dharod, 2008). In Idaho, the prevalence of overweight and obese adults has increased significantly in the past decade, from 55.7% in 2000, to 61.3% in 2009 (Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, 2010). Investment in effective community programs that promote increased physical activity and good nutrition and improve overall health is the motivation behind developing the weight loss challenge described here. The Idaho County 'Biggest Loser' Weight Loss Challenge is designed as a community-wide physical activity, and nutrition education campaign. Participants are measured and assessed in the following areas at the kick-off event: The goal is to provide a competitive and educational healthy lifestyle program to improve overall health. Starting with the 2011 challenge, participants were given a retrospective pre-post survey during the educational presentation on metabolism, nutrition, and physical activity. The intention of the survey was to measure which healthy lifestyle actions and behaviors the participants were continuing with following the completion of the challenge. Total weight loss was a combined measure of the participants who completed and returned the survey. Since 2009, 47 men and 541 women have participated in the "Biggest Loser" Weight Loss Challenge, 32% completing the full program. The Y's way to physical fitness: The complete guide to fitness testing and instruction (3rd ed.).


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Biggest Loser' results : Better than weight - loss surgery


The formula for weight loss a la "Biggest Loser": a daily regimen of one hour of intense resistance exercise, one hour of intense aerobic exercise and two hours of moderate aerobic activity, and calorie intake that ranges from 1,600 to 2,000 calories for men and 1,000 to 1,400 for women. The show's approach to weight loss has been highly controversial, with many dietitian and physicians denouncing "Biggest Loser" for promoting rapid and unsustainable weight loss and unrealistic expectations for physical activity. He added that slow weight loss routinely results in muscle loss, leaving patients with a higher proportion of fat-to-lean muscle tissue: "Loser" participants, by contrast, changed their body composition in the opposite direction, ending with a higher ratio of lean muscle and bone to fat than they had had at the outset. Huizenga said that such changes had "never been documented before in the history of severe weight loss." He said he had applied to the National Institutes of Health for a study grant that would allow him to compare the health benefits of a "Biggest Loser"-type regimen with those of bariatric surgery. At a minimum, said Huizenga, the health benefits seen in the "Loser" participants demonstrate that current definitions of intensive medical intervention for weight loss fall far short of what will be needed to restore the severely obese to health. By Week 5 of their participation in the program, "all diagnostic criteria for pre-diabetes, diabetes and hypertension were absent in each participant," he said. In an interview, Huizenga said the "Biggest Loser" approach, which shocks a patient's body to build muscle and bone while losing fat, may be intensive and costly.


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Biggest Loser contestant Cameron shocks with record


Cameron was shocked by his weight loss during last night's elimination episode. BIGGEST Loser contestant Cameron has shocked by shedding the most amount of weight within the first week in the history of the Australian show. The 34-year-old father-of-three stepped onto the scales to find he had lost a total of 15 kilograms in the first competitive weigh-in of the series during Sunday night's episode. Last week, a doctor told Cameron he was likely to die at the age of 52 if he didn't drastically change his lifestyle. Unfortunately for contestants Rodger and Mary, they were both put up for elimination after the Blue team fell below the yellow line. Mary was given a second chance, while Rodger, a 51-year-old father-of-three, departed the house 5.9 kilograms lighter then when he arrived.


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The Biggest Loser - Wikipedia, the free


The Biggest Loser (U. The Biggest Loser. The trainers are responsible (in conjunction with medical personnel retained by the show) for designing comprehensive workout and nutrition plans and teaching them to the contestants. The season finale features both the contestants remaining on the show and those sent home early; the latter are brought back for the final show. Contestants compete to win a prize, first as teams and then as individuals after the teams are dissolved. Contestants work out with the trainers. All contestants are weighed to determine the amount they have lost relative to their total body weight. When the teams are dissolved and the show becomes an individual competition, the two contestants who lose the lowest percentage of weight are below the yellow line and are eligible for elimination. The contestants are now expected to weigh in before challenges. The contestants that are below the yellow line face an elimination challenge before the vote. The two contestants that are the least successful in the competition faces the vote. Several former Biggest Loser contestants have regained some or all of the weight." [6] Contestants on the show lose upwards of 10 pounds per week (in the very first week, some contestants have lost 20–30+ pounds in that one week alone), whereas the established medical guidelines for safe weight loss are between 1 and 2 pounds per week.


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Biggest Loser' Winner Rachel Frederickson Raises


Some fans of NBC's weight loss reality show " The Biggest Loser " are expressing outrage over the show's latest champion: 24-year-old Rachel Frederickson, who lost 60 percent of her original body weight to win the $250,000 grand prize. When she emerged on the stage for the last show, cameras panned to shocked "Biggest Loser" trainers Bob Harper and Jillian Michaels, who clapped slowly but seemed to mouth, "Oh my God." That's a far cry from two pounds per week, which is the upper limit of what most doctors and dietitians recommend for their weight loss patients. But a 2013 meta-analysis of myths around weight loss and obesity research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, found no scientific evidence that supports slow and steady weight loss over rapid weight loss. Losing one pound a day, Casazza told The Huffington Post, isn't healthy for the average person. "She was metabolically programmed differently than an ordinary person, and you have to take all of that in context when you talk about healthy pace of weight loss." Casazza, who has not personally evaluated Frederickson and is not affiliated with the reality show, is an expert on body tissue partitioning (the interplay between fat, bone and muscle) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham - and also happens to be a fan of "The Biggest Loser." Based on her research, Casazza had also predicted that Frederickson would win this year's competition. "Up until the final episode when she was losing weight with the trainers, not at home, she looked a lot healthier and looked like she was preserving the bone and lean mass," said Casazza. A screenshot from the "Biggest Loser" finale, which compared Frederickson on the right to a hologram of how she looked at the beginning of the show. "It's not just a question about BMI," said Bowerman, who also hasn't medically evaluated the contestant and isn't affiliated with the show. She also said it was understandable that a weight loss program that is supervised and supported with many interventions, like that of "The Biggest Loser," results in faster loss than the efforts of the average person attempting to drop pounds without a doctor's help. But Bowerman did warn that drastic weight loss, which strips away lean mass in addition to fat, is harmful over the long haul. For instance, a repeated cycle of loss and gain might leave someone with a higher body fat percentage but less muscle to help regulate weight. "The Biggest Loser" has come under fire in the past for its weight loss methods, which have included pushing contestants to compete to the point of hospitalization and to take caffeine supplements . In 2010, season three finalist Kai Hibbard told told body image coach and writer Golda Poretsky that trying to lose weight for the finale left her so weak and defeated that her family staged an intervention to deal with the new eating disorder she said she had developed.


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Lose 20 Pounds in 3 Weeks with 'Biggest Loser' Trainer Bob


There is nothing like Bob looking you in the eye and telling you you can do it. Every time you eat you should have the following ratio: It’s not that complex carbohydrates are evil or that you can never have them again (you can!), but most people rely too heavily on carbohydrates of the complex variety, and don’t get enough simple ones! Fats are not “bad”—­we just need to use the right ones the right way. Freebie Calories: Eat as many vegetables as you want for fullness and fiber. Complex Carbohydrates -> eat in the morning. The later in the day you eat complex carbs, the more likely you will have cravings at night. This will help you lose weight. Health tip of the week- drink a gallon of water a day will help you lose weight and have more energy. You have to EAT to lose weight. If you enjoyed this video, and you're interested in learning wellness tips that are customized for women over 50, here are the next steps:


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Weighty Matters : The Biggest Loser Destroys Participants


The Biggest Loser Destroys Participants' Metabolisms. And as far as rapid non-surgical weight loss goes, there's probably no weight loss program more rapid than that of the television show The Biggest Loser, where it’s not uncommon for contestants to lose upwards of 150lbs at an averaged pace of nearly 10lbs a week. So is the weight lost on the Biggest Loser, a show now formally endorsed by the First Lady as an inspiration to the nation, healthy? In an article published yesterday ahead of print , Darcy Johannsen and friends studied the impact 7 months of Biggest Loser weight loss had on the resting and total energy expenditures of 16 participants. Bariatric surgery patients lose massive amounts of weight in a hurry as well, and they generally do so without the inane extremes of lifestyle endorsed by the Biggest Loser. If there were a study on the impact bariatric surgery losses had on resting and total energy expenditure, that would certainly offer some insight as to the healthfulness of Biggest Loser's weight loss program. Published in 2003 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition researchers looked at the impact bariatric surgical losses had on the resting and total energy expenditures of 30 men and women whose pre-operative average BMIs of 50 were within 1 point of the Biggest Loser contestants' averages of 49, and who lost a Biggest Loser style average of 117.5lbs. Looking at these two studies, Biggest Loser style weight loss destroys metabolisms dramatically more than does bariatric surgery and does so in huge excess of what would be expected simply as a consequence of losing weight (though I suppose to be fair, the study on the surgical patients was done at 14 +/- 2 months, while the Biggest Losers' was at 7 - perhaps the Losers' metabolisms will improve with time) Metabolically speaking, it would seem to me that his own study would suggest bariatric surgical weight loss is far healthier to a body's metabolism than is Biggest Loser style loss. He was the winner of the third season of the Biggest Loser. I think the Biggest Loser provided him with a nonsensical and metabolically dangerous approach to weight management, and in the process, stacked his deck entirely against him. Jennifer Kuk who wondered whether or not the Biggest Loser subjects had their energy expenditures measured in the week or days leading up to the finale. Metabolic Slowing with Massive Weight Loss despite Preservation of Fat-Free Mass The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism : 10.1210/jc.2012-1444.


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Does anyone know what the average weight


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Biggest Loser’ show has big health problems


In the past seasons, the weight-loss reality show has repeatedly set new benchmarks for heaviest contestant (454, 476 and 526 pounds), fastest 100-pound weight loss (seven weeks), and most weight lost in one week (34 pounds). The show, which takes obese Americans and pits them against each other in a battle to lose the most weight and win $250,000, thrives on extreme numbers. But physicians and nutritionists worry the show's focus on competitive weight loss is, at best, counterproductive and, at worst, dangerous. The show's producers point out that contestants are under medical supervision and say the extreme nature of the competition is inspirational for viewers. And of course, there are serious health risks to being as obese as the "Biggest Loser" contestants. The risks become more pronounced as the obesity becomes more severe, and losing weight is a very good idea, said Wolin-Riklin — if done right.


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Biggest Loser Winner : How Much Weight Loss Is Too Much


That means that she lost a whopping 60 percent of her body weight—crazy, right! So here’s the ultimate, and more leigitimate, question: Is it ever safe to lose 60 percent of your body weight, like Frederickson did? “It definitely can be—if you have 60 percent of your body weight to lose,” says Keri Glassman, R. “If a short 300-pound guy lost 60 percent of his body weight, for example, chances are, he would be fine.


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Biggest Loser' Contestant's Shocking Weight Loss - ABC News


The uproar over the winner of "The biggest loser" who some are saying lost too much weight. Rachel Frederickson shocked fans when she revealed the body that went from 260 pounds all the way down to just 105 pounds. It's not a healthy model for how you should be losing weight. What we recommend is one to two pounds per week, not the kind of enormous weight loss that she experienced. Our dear friend extreme weight loss transformationist, the special it and author of the book "Choose more, lose more," Chris Powell. This is the most in the history of this program, the percentage of body loss, what do you think about all it? Clearly what she did was impressive to lose that much weight. I mean that really is the name of the game to lose as much as you can in a short amount of time as you possibly can. Of course, in my opinion, though, the one thing that raises red flags is how fast she did it and how far she went. You have to change the way you think if you want to lose weight. Is it possible that she's taken this too far, that it's turned into kind of an unhealthy obsession of losing the weight. It's so easy to switch over to the opposite end of the spectrum and maintain that unhealthy relationship with food by simply undereating. We deal with this a lot throughout our process, as well, working with people on the show and off the show. It's easy to overeat and it's easy to undereat, the true challenge is finding that balance. But then again throw a $250,000 cash prize in the mix and guess what, it's a slugfest to lose as much as you can.


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Jillian Michaels Talks Biggest Loser's Rachel Frederickson


Jillian Michaels has opened up about Biggest Loser contestant Rachel Frederickson's dramatic weight loss: she "lost too much weight" Credit: Theo Wargo/Getty. The Biggest Loser trainer finally opened up about Season 15 winner Rachel Frederickson's dramatic weight loss, noting that she had no idea that the former high school swimmer had dropped a staggering 155 pounds by the show's series finale. "Nobody told me like, 'Oh hey, Rachel is very, very thin.' Bob [Harper] and I had no idea," Michaels, 40, told Huff Post Live in a recent Skype interview. Biggest Loser Season 15 winner Rachel Frederickson Trae Patton/NBC. "I was immediately concerned and wondering how this happened," the Biggest Loser vet continued to Huff Po. PHOTOS: Biggest Loser winners.


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Is the 'Biggest Loser' too skinny? - NY Daily News


The Biggest Loser via You Tube. Rachel Frederickson weighed 260 pounds (left) when she started on ‘The Biggest Loser,’ but showed off a new 105-pound frame on Tuesday (right). She’s the tiniest “Biggest Loser” winner in history. Now viewers are blasting Frederickson for her extreme weight loss, and wondering if the show let her take it too far. “I followed the advice and the support of the medical team on ‘The Biggest Loser,’” she added. “I thought she was shockingly skinny,” Nicole Michalik, who appeared on season 4 of “The Biggest Loser,” wrote on Twitter. Rachel Frederickson on Tuesday’s finale of ‘The Biggest Loser.’ “And I thought I was too skinny at ‘The Biggest Loser’ finale,” she wrote on Twitter. Jillian Michaels & Bob Harper's reaction to the #Biggest Loser winner's disturbing weight loss says it all. She lost 155 pounds and won ‘The Biggest Loser,’ but now fans say she’s too skinny. Been pulling for Rachel the entire season but I think she took it a bit too far. Rachel Frederickson, the latest winner of ‘The Biggest Loser.’ Fans criticized her for losing too much weight. Frederickson, lost 60% of her body weight during about four and a half months on the show. She appeared on the “Today” show Wednesday, but didn’t address the criticism surrounding her new weight.


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Biggest Loser champ Rachel Frederickson calls weight


Rachel Frederickson's 155-pound weight loss on the season 15 finale of The Biggest Loser made fans worry she became anorexic. Two months later, the newly thin 24-year-old weighs 125, and she now calls the backlash 'a gift.' Now curvier: Rachel Frederickson, pictured on March 2, told Us Weekly on Wednesday she feels good with an extra 20 pounds on her body after losing 155 pounds for The Biggest Loser. Rachel has repeatedly denied having developed an eating disorder on the NBC reality competition, but she still exercises six out of seven days a week. 'I love classes like Soul Cycle!': Rachel has repeatedly denied having developed an eating disorder on the reality competition, but she still exercises six out of seven days a week. Frederickson continued: 'We have monthly calls with the other contestants and the show psychologist. 'I'll call her from the farmer's market and say, "What is this? Rachel's 155-pound weight loss on the season 15 finale of The Biggest Loser, which aired in early February, made fans worry she became anorexic. At her largest: Frederickson, seen here in 2013, has said, 'We have monthly calls with the other contestants and the show psychologist.


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