Losing Weight Training For Marathon


Why Am I Gaining Weight During Marathon Training


So while that may translate to an overall weight gain, your body fat percentage has decreased and you're more toned than you were before. Your body also requires additional water to break down and store the glycogen, so that will also add extra weight. The basic principle for weight loss still applies: You must burn more calories than you consume. With all the calories you burn by running , some people are surprised when they don't lose weight during marathon training, but they forget that they're inhaling a quart of ice cream and a dozen Oreos for a snack after their run. It will make you think twice about the foods you're putting in your mouth and also help you figure out what foods work best for you. Just because you're training for a marathon doesn't mean that you need to constantly drink sugary sports drinks. While it's important that you replace electrolytes during your long runs , you don't need to constantly have a sports drink at your fingertips the rest of the time. If you've been eating a nutritious diet and you still find that you're gaining weight, try not to focus too much on that number on the scale. And if you really want to lose weight, remember that healthy weight loss takes time. Even with all the running that you're doing, you should not aim to lose more than a pound a week.


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How to Lose Weight While Running a Lot


So if that’s what happens when you run a lot, how can you accomplish both your weight loss and running goals? But there are ways to control your Cookie Monster cravings, get all the nutrition and fuel you need to run well, and lose weight. “How can I lose weight and run a lot at the same time? I don’t want to stop running to go on a strict diet but I’m unclear as to how I can lose weight and run at the same time.” Have you ever wondered how you can keep losing weight while eating all of the carbs necessary for running? And to lose weight (and keep it off), you have to run smart. There’s comforting news for competitive runners: smart training can help you lose more weight than “just” running. The progression of workouts, “extras,” long runs, and even frequency of running all work together to help you lose weight. Curb Your Appetite and Lose Weight (No Dieting Required) And in case you’re hesitant: a daily protein shake will not cause you to gain weight or “bulk up.” There’s not enough calories and you’re not doing the weight workouts necessary to gain muscle mass. But that doesn’t change the truth that if you’re trying to lose weight, nutrient dense and low caloric density foods need to form the corner stones of your diet.


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Tips : Healthy Weight Loss During Marathon Training


Tips: Healthy Weight Loss During Marathon Training. Sometimes weight can become an issue during marathon training. Learn the correct way to lose weight while still training at a high level. So it is not surprising that an increasing amount of beginner and amateur runners and walkers are signing up for marathon training programs as a means to aid weight loss and improve overall health and fitness. Here are five tips that encourage healthy weight loss during marathon training. Get product sneak-peeks and insider offers from the top running and fitness brands. You'll also get access to top running content including training plans and stories on gear, nutrition and recovery.


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How to Lose Weight While Training for a Marathon


Step 1. The long run is crucial to running a successful marathon and the long runs are great for weight loss. Step 2. Eat a small meal with a mix of protein and complex carbs to fuel your body properly for the task at hand before the run. Step 3. The proteins will help repair muscle tissue that naturally tears during a long run and the complex carbs will help even out your blood sugar levels. Step 4. Step 5. Step 6. You might feel like you are more hungry and need more food as your training intensifies. Step 7. Step 8. You do need carbs in your body for energy on race day, but do not go overboard the day before. Lean proteins, like fish, chicken and tofu will give you the protein your muscles require for recovery without the fats of red meat.


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Why Am I not Losing Weight Despite Training For A Marathon


Muscle therefore weighs more than the adipose tissue, and so this translates to more weight displayed on the scale. While you may not see any weight loss on the scale, or rather a rise, look out for other relevant changes in your body. ALSO READ:  Inspired to run a marathon? ALSO READ:  5 steps to train for a marathon. If, on most days of the week you intersperse walking and running and do that intense run once a week only, then you may have to amp it up. ALSO READ:   Tips for a hail and hearty marathon run. Also, to compensate for the dehydration that may occur due to sweat loss in the running, it is mandatory to drink more water. ALSO READ:  Why is important to train for marathon? The more you exercise, the more you exhaust your nutrient stores, and the more you feel you deserve to eat. ALSO READ:  Nutrition tips for marathon runners. ALSO READ:  Training for marathon: Part one. If you are running for less than an hour, water is enough to fuel your run, unless the weather is very humid and hot and you are losing a lot of fluids. ALSO READ:  Inspired To run marathon?


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The Impact of Weight Loss on Marathon Running


But you can also improve your time by changing your body composition. How fast you can run depends on your body's capacity for using oxygen, which is known as your VO 2 max. If you weigh more, your body needs more oxygen to operate. D puts it, "the more you weigh, the more oxygen, or energy, it takes to run at a given speed." By losing weight you decrease your body's oxygen needs. This will increase your VO 2 max, allowing you to run your marathon at a faster pace with less energy. Williams, "for every 1 percent loss of body mass, primarily as body fat, there will be an approximate 1 percent increase in running speed." So if you weigh 200 pounds and you drop 20 pounds of fat, you can expect to increase your speed by about 10 percent. You need a certain amount of body fat to function properly. Dipping below these levels can hurt your health and your marathon performance. Your doctor can measure your body fat percentage and tell you if you have any fat to lose. Williams, excessive weight loss will adversely affect marathon performance and can cause hormonal disturbance and even premature osteoporosis.


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Running and losing weight - Fitbit Community


Over the past 2 years, I've lost 100 pounds and would like to lose 10 more. When you exercise, you will burn more than Fitbit predicted, subtract 500 and you'll be eating more than 1400. Second issue, for only 10 lbs to lose and doing that much exercise, 500 cal deficit or 1 lb weekly is NOT reasonable anymore, unless you feel like fighting for that 1 lb, your body fighting back, and not getting nearly as much out of your workouts. Your body will adapt to the stress of trying to lose more than it wants, and you'll end up losing less than you want anyway, but with a stressed out body. If a person was squating say 200 lbs max for so many sets and reps, and they lost 25 lbs, but now they squat 205 lbs max for same sets and reps, did they actually increase the weight they squated? (Think about a squat and what you are doing) They actually lost strength, and if diet was severe enough for that 25 lbs, lost muscle too. If walking was all you did during your weight loss, you lost muscle mass along with the fat, sorry to tell you, but you did. Some of it you don't need of course, do you need the same calf muscles that carried 235 lbs to carry 135 lbs? If walking is only exercise, and you don't add incline or a weight vest to increase the workout and compensate for lost weight, you can only walk so fast to make up for it, eventually you can't walk fast enough to make up the difference. You likely need to slow down and train the low-end fat burning system for endurance. And yes, I lost my final 2 lbs in the 4 weeks of half-marathon training I just did.


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Marathon Training Weight Gain - Appetite for Health


If so, make sure you don’t GAIN weight as you amp up your training. I’m on a training program myself for the Big Sur Half Marathon and two wine country half marathons that I do every year. I almost always gain weight during my marathon training because I eat whenever I’m hungry and feel that I “deserve” the treats after my long runs. If you’re one of the nearly 500,000 marathoners, don’t let the uber-lean bodies of elite marathoners lead you to believe that training for a 26.2-mile event will put you on the fast track to thin. According to research presented at the American College of Sports Medicine this year, you may actually gain weight—especially if you’re a woman—training for a marathon. In the 3-month study, researchers put 64 individuals on a marathon training program, 78% experienced no change in body weight, 11% lost weight and 11% gained weight. While the study does not tell us why some women gained weight during the rigorous endurance program, the researchers noted that three-quarters of women in the study reported eating more food while just 48% of men said they were eating more food as a result of the increased volume of training. So, what you can do to lose weight and train for triathlons, marathons or other endurance events is some of the following tips form other sports dietitians. Eat more on days when you have big training days and eat less on the days when you aren’t training. According to Nancy Clark, MS, RD, CSSD, author of Food Guide for Marathoners: Tips for Everyday Champions, “Fuel by day and eat less at night.” This way you’ll have the energy they need to run and refuel and eating more during the day will curb your nighttime appetite. Is your goal to run a marathon or to lose weight?


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Does Marathon Training Cause Weight Gain


Does Marathon Training Cause Weight Gain? In addition to the self-satisfaction you’ll be relishing come 26.2 miles, there’s often another reason why many of us—despite never having run more than a 5 K before—register for months of grueling training: It’s bound to (finally!) help us say sayonara to those lingering five pounds, right? And in some cases, it can even work in reverse, with marathon runners gaining weight instead of losing it. One study found the concept of “carb loading” is partially to blame, particularly for novice runners. In addition, as one study published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research indicates, many times, weight gain or inability to lose weight is caused by exercisers “compensating” for all the burned energy by eating more. Have you noticed it’s difficult to lose weight when training for a marathon?


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How to Lose Weight While Training for a Marathon


How to Lose Weight While Training for a Marathon. I lost 10 pounds when training for the 2011 Towpath Marathon, and have successfully maintained or lost weight while running reduced volume due to injury on two occasions. This article will discuss how to manage your diet during training for the marathon by identifying and striving for an improved race weight. You'll see several tools and discussions on the concept of "ideal race weight," which is based strictly on your height and gender. Tools like the  Runner's Projection Utilities  can give you a sense of how much weight loss can translate into time gained on the race course. Looking strictly at the impact of "spreading" your VO 2 max over a lighter weight, the gains are roughly 1 minute/pound in the marathon if you are in the 20 to 25 BMI range (give or take a few points), and can be more significant if you are above that. You can calculate your  daily calorie needs  outside of your training based on your gender, height, weight and activity level. Around 120 calories per mile if you are ~150 to 180 lbs. Around 140 calories per mile if you are 180 lbs.


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Weight Loss During Marathon Improves Running Time


20, 2010 - Marathoners who lost the most body weight during a race finished more quickly, even though their weight loss exceeded the amount typically recommended for best running performance, according to a new study. The weight loss reflects a lower level of fluid intake or a faster rate of fluid loss. At the start, 884 marathoners agreed to participate, and 643 of those finished and were included in the study results. The study participants - 560 men and 83 women - weighed in at the start of the race and then at the finish. On average, runners in the group overall lost 2.3% of their body weight during the race. But when Noakes looked at the weight loss and finishing times, he found those who lost the most ran the fastest. The three groups, by time, and their weight loss: Those who finished under three hours averaged a 3.1% body weight loss. Those who finished between three and four hours lost 2.5%.


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How to not to lose muscle mass while marathon training


It’s frequently reported that you can either gain muscle or do distance running, but the two simply can’t be done together. I want to explain how I do both, and the tips for maintaining muscle while training for a marathon. If you are training for a marathon and lose weight most likely some of it is muscle. “Can you build muscle while simultaneously marathon training?” After you have built more muscle, you will be stronger for your runs to prevent injury, you will most likely be faster, and you will be able to eat more (which is always a winner). That doesn’t mean that you have to workout for 3 hours every day. If you don’t refill them, then after they are emptied out, the next place your body goes is for the muscle. You’ve got to make sure that you are getting enough and there have been many times that I’m forcing more food at the end of the day sometimes just to make sure that I know I’m properly fueled. Do strength training that makes sense for running. Your long run purpose is for you to get used to the mileage or you are increasing your endurance, so that’s its purpose. You CAN have muscle and be a long distance runner – learn how from @katiesfitscript @runtothefinish. Do you feel like you lose muscle during marathon training?


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Running and not Losing Weight - POPSUGAR Fitness


Running and Not Losing Weight. Training For a Marathon and Still Gaining Weight. But I'm also trying to lose 15 pounds and not gain weight so I'm just not sure what I'm doing wrong. Don't worry about the weight, focus on performance and how you feel :-) If you are below that weight you will be weaker and slower. I'm gaining weight too =( I'm not training for a marathon, but I do a lot of lunges, squats and different arm workouts. I also totally agree with you that if someone's main goal is to lose weight, training for a marathon is not a good idea. Anon #18 - I think it's easier to lose weight when training for a half than it is when training for a full because most of the training runs for half marathons aren't that long. When training for a full marathon, it's really hard to eat enough calories to fuel a 16+ mile run, plus weekday runs, and to still create the caloric deficit needed to lose weight. Weight loss worked for you because you limited the amount of calories you consumed. And that said, marathon training is often not an effective weight loss program. Focus on what you are accomplishing and not what the scale says.


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Lose weight - train for a half marathon! - Running Weight Loss


Running a half marathon and losing some weight are like two sides of the same coin. Running is a great way of burning calories – it’s one of the most energy intensive exercises which you can do, burning around 100 calories per mile, and with training you can build up to running long distances potentially burning thousands of calories in one training session. The more miles you run a week, the less you weigh. Don’t forget that, as well as burning calories, running will also increase your muscle mass – especially if you do some toning exercises for you upper body at the same time. This can happen even before you can start to see the difference in your body. So sometimes you do a lot of exercise in a week, and hop expectantly onto the scales at the end of the week, only to be disappointed. If losing weight is the only goal this can be very frustrating. But if your real goal is to lose FAT (and incidentally greatly improve you health and fitness) you can still feel smug, and think about the longer term gains you have made. And if your best efforts in running have still not led to any weight loss after a few weeks, that is almost certainly what you have been doing. So go ahead, book up your first half marathon , and set the goal of completing it. And you might just have got the running bug.


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How to Lose Weight By Running - Runners Connect


Regardless, it’s important that you approach weight loss while running carefully and with a specific plan in place. If you don’t balance your caloric intake with your caloric expenditure carefully, you won’t have the energy to run hard and finish important workouts, or you’ll find yourself binging and losing all the weight loss gains you’ve made. It’s critical that you pay close attention to the number of calories you’re taking in (caloric intake) and the calories you’re using (caloric expenditure). Simply enter your weight, the total number of minutes you ran, and your average pace. Armed with all the information you need, you can start making a daily plan to slowly cut enough calories to lose weight while keeping your energy levels high enough to hit the hard workouts and recover properly. When we want to lose weight, we just cut as many calories as we can and push through the fatigue – naively thinking we’re making progress. If you want to maintain your training levels and make progress towards your running goals, it’s important that you don’t cut too many calories from each day. You should aim to have a total deficit of 400-600 calories per day if you want to lose weight while running. If you don’t have enough energy to perform your hard running workouts, such as tempo runs and long runs , you miss the opportunity to make significant gains in fitness.


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Marathon Training and Weight Loss


I am following your Novice 1 program for the Flying Pig Marathon in May. The app figured that if I eat 1,400 calories per day, with exercise, for three months, I would reach my goal of 170. Couple that with the fact that I'm training for a marathon, and I figured that I would easily hit my goal. I received your tweet recently saying that if someone is training for a marathon and running 25 miles per week, they should be eating 3,000 calories a day. So I am conflicted as to how best train for the marathon, stay healthy but also lose weight in the process. From your tweet today, it appears that I am not eating enough, but even at that, the weight isn't coming off like I thought it should. I'd like to train per your instructions so as to be healthy and complete the marathon, but I'd also like to lose weight in the process and keep it off by continuing to run after the marathon is done. In all honesty, I feel that training for a marathon and attempting to lose weight are conflicting goals. You need calories for energy, and if you're starving yourself with a low-calorie diet, you may not have enough fuel in your system to do the long runs comfortably. And by the way, that 3,000 calories cited was just an estimate. Hal Higdon is a Contributing Editor for Runner’s World and author of 34 books, including the best-selling Marathon: The Ultimate Training Guide.


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Marathon Weight Training


I promise to use it only to send you The Marathon Rookie Times. Again, you DO NOT have to lift weights during training to finish a marathon or half marathon. Some of the benefits of marathon weight training. Otherwise, you may find your muscles to be tight and the run to be very uncomfortable. Use weight that you can easily complete two sets of twelve repetitions without the assistance of a spotter. I am not saying to not use a spotter, rather that your spotter should not have to assist you in completing these two sets. • Dumbbell Curls (2 x 12): Use weight you can do two sets of twelve repetitions. • Lat Pulls (2 x 12): Use weight you can pull down and finish two sets of twelve repetitions. • Back Extensions (2 x 12): Do not use weight for this one. • Sit-Ups (2 x 15): Repetitions can really vary on this one depending on your choice and how easily you can do sit-ups. You are marathon weight training, not training for a weight lifting competition.


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How to Lose Weight While Training for a Marathon


Instead of worrying about calculating each and every week, it may be best to just take the total mileage over your training plan and determine the average weekly amount of extra calories you will burn. For example, if you weigh 174 pounds and you run an average of 52 miles per week over an 18-week plan, your extra burn will be 6,250 calories per week. Once you set your goal and calculate the weekly deficit needed, you can set your target weekly calorie intake. ACTIVE also makes it easy to learn and prepare for all the things you love to do with expert resources, training plans and fitness calculators. Get up to $10 off your ACTIVE registrations and more. ACTIVE Advantage is the premium membership program of ACTIVE, designed to support and encourage your active lifestyle by providing exclusive discounts on thousands of activities on ACTIVE. No matter what your passions are, it is our mission to make it cheaper and easier for you to pursue the activities you love. What is the ACTIVE Advantage trial membership? The 30-day trial of the ACTIVE Advantage membership allows you to check out the program for yourself before starting a full annual membership. During this trial period you have full access to member benefits, including all ACTIVE registration discounts, access to free event entries, gear discounts and more. Otherwise, at the end of your 30 day trial we will extend your member benefits for a full year at the current annual membership fee. If you sign up for the 30-day ACTIVE Advantage trial membership you'll receive full access to all member benefits during your trial period. If you wish to cancel your ACTIVE Advantage membership, you can do so in one of 3 ways:


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Tips : Healthy Weight Loss During Marathon Training


Extreme calorie and macronutrient restriction (more than 500 calories/day) during marathon training can present a negative impact on bone-mineral density and increase the risk for stress fractures as well as delay recovery. To ensure adequate energy intake on long run days and to prevent overindulgence post-run, supplement with 30-60 grams of carbohydrates each hour of running (one energy gel plus a sports drink) and consume 50-75 grams of carbohydrates with 10-15 grams of protein (a cup of low fat chocolate milk) immediately after finishing a run. Get our best running content delivered to your inbox. Subscribe to the FREE Competitor Running newsletter. Get product sneak-peeks and insider offers from the top running and fitness brands. You'll also get access to top running content including training plans and stories on gear, nutrition and recovery.


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Losing Weight While Marathon Training : Impossible


Losing Weight While Marathon Training: Impossible? One of the most common reasons people start to train for a marathon is to lose weight.  So before we go any further, hear me out: if all you want is to lose weight, there are many far easier ways to do so than running a marathon, so I recommend that you reconsider your goals. Once you have another motivation, but you also want to drop some weight while training, you may think it’s easy.  After all, if you’re running so many miles, you just have to lose weight automatically, right? Sorry to tell you, but it’s just not that easy to lose weight while distance running.  In fact, many studies show that the vast majority of women who train for their first marathon either gain or maintain their weight, despite the increased activity.  (Men, on the other hand, tend to lose a little bit of weight or maintain their weight while marathon training). If you don’t actually need to lose weight while you are training, I would recommend that you separate your two goals.  Ideally, you’d spend time getting to your goal weight, and then dive into marathon training afterwards.  But if you’re determined to lose (or maintain) your weight while training for a marathon, here are a few things I recommend:


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Three Reasons Why You're not Losing Weight While Training


Is this common, and do you have any idea why I'm not losing weight? Of course this varies, but keeping tabs will inform you on the balance it takes to lose, maintain, and gain weight while training. This can also be the case for some runners when they consume too many carbohydrates and not enough protein and fat in meals. And let's not even get into the lack of nutrients for recovery and performance when you eat quick foods. The Solution: Making a few small changes in how you eat can quickly solve this problem,  stabilize your blood sugar levels, and curb your cravings. It keeps you satisfied for hours, provides essential nutrients for your body, and will help you lose weight. One of these is enough to offset your balance and create momentum for weight gain but when you combine them all together, it's the perfect storm. For instance, if you go from running once or twice per week for 2-3 miles to start a typical 20-week marathon training plan , that is an increase of 70% or more and a tremendous stress on the body. You'll feel stronger, enjoy your foods more, and lose weight because you're giving the body what it needs to perform at its metabolic best. Finally, if you ain't sleeping, you're likely not recovering—and likely not eating enough and burning the candle at both ends. Set yourself up for a good night's sleep and invest in it like you do your training.


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A Marathon Runner's Weight and Speed


A Marathon Runner's Weight and Speed. As a marathon runner, your weight will significantly affect your speed and endurance. Your weight should be 15 percent lighter than the average man at your same height. As you increase the amount of miles you log per week, you will burn calories, which should help you lose weight. In addition to running, eating foods that are low in fat, such as lean meat, fruit, vegetables and whole grains while avoiding fatty foods will help you lose weight at a faster pace. Running at about 80 percent of your maximum speed is the ideal rate for burning fat. In addition to losing weight to increase your marathon time, strength and additional cardiovascular training will help you increase your speed. While building muscle is counterproductive to marathon racing, keeping your muscles tight and toned will help keep you light and powerful while running. Performing barbell and dumbbell exercises with several repetitions and minimal weight will help you tone and carve your muscles. In addition, burning calories and losing weight to improve your speed should be done with the help of a nutritionist or a health care specialist.


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Can You Run To Lose Weight While Also Training For A Race


Can You Run To Lose Weight While Also Training For A Race? Running is better than resistance training for weight loss ( source ) So if you’d like to lose weight, then running is one of the best forms of exercise to help you accomplish all of your goals. But there’s a difference between running to lose weight and training for a race. And many runners encounter problems when they try to do both: train for a race and lose weight. “If you diet while training [for a race], you won’t perform at your best because you won’t be able to adequately repair your muscles after workouts,” says Anne Mauney, MPH, RD, the author of the food and fitness blog  f ANNEtastic food and marathon runner. The solution is to focus on weight loss before you start training for a race. During this 4-8 week period, the focus is on losing weight rather than running performance. This one component to your weight loss efforts may be the most important. A groundbreaking study from the Nutrition Journal found that a nutrient-dense diet lessens hunger and is an effective way for improving health and losing weight.


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Strength Training for Marathon Runners - Men's Fitness


Strength Training for Marathon Runners. With the start of marathon training or distance running events, many guys ditch the weights in favor of additional miles on the road. Maintaining a strength training  program is critical for improving running efficiency particularly for those going the full 26.2. Each phase of a marathon training program has a different focus. Your strength training plan should mirror and support that focus. We've outlined four typical phases of a marathon training plan allowing for a total of 16 weeks until race day and the complimentary strength training phase. Adjust your strength training according to the indicated phase to build muscle, maintain strength, and finish your marathon goal feeling strong. The Base Phase of marathon training is imperative for a great performance on race day. Although the mileage and intensity may be lower, this phase is crucial to ease runners into a harder training schedule. Runners slowly begin to add miles to their training routine to increase their cardiovascular fitness and slowly acclimate their body to the increase in mileage. Similarly, the Stability Phase is meant to ease the body into strength training. P., of jkconditioning.com , "Runners should include strength training during the Base Phase of their marathon training so that the negative effects of weight training [delayed onset muscle soreness] does not interfere with important races."  During the Stability Phase, the focus isn't on the weight but rather on form and execution.


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Diet for Runners : Eat for Endurance and Lose Weight


Over the years, I’ve refined how I think about food and the best diet for runners. What’s changed is that I now understand what’s good for you and what’s not. Have a cheat weekend where you only eat junk food and processed food. Not only will you rid your home of unhealthy food, you’ll be craving the healthy stuff. Perfection can be the enemy of the good and you need to let yourself enjoy food that you love. Vegetables are the best food group for you. There are three “hacks” or diet strategies that you can use for specific situations in your training. A Paleo diet isn’t 100% compatible with heavy training but you can do it while running easy for most of your workouts. How to avoid over-training: The feelings of over-training can hit you like a sledgehammer: fatigue, soreness, lethargy, and poor performances in your running workouts. And of course, sleep is the best recovery tool you have so get a lot of it. I want to leave you with three action steps that you can do today to improve your diet. Once all that junk food is in your stomach, you need to replace it with the good stuff. There are countless diets for runners and you need to find what works for you.


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Marathons and Weight Loss


You can submit your question by joining the discussions on  Hal Higdon's Virtual Training Bulletin Boards . How do you effectively lose weight while training for a marathon and still get enough calories for the long runs and the race itself? I am a month into my training, and I worry that I will not have enough energy to train properly, particularly as the long runs get longer and longer. I would prefer to see them begin to lose the weight, and only then take their tinier bodies to a marathon. The secret to weight loss while training for a marathon is to achieve a caloric deficit. Multiply that by 7 days and you achieve a 3,500 calorie weekly deficit, close to the 3,600 calories that cause the loss of one pound. That might get you down to the previously targeted 10-15 pounds weight loss. The less you eat and the more you run, the more the body conserves energy, particularly in runners who are lean and trying to get to their best "racing weight." Weight loss is just not as mathematical and as linear as we would like it to be! You need to fuel before, during and after your long runs, so you have the energy to train well and recover well. You do not want to lose weight when you are trying to train. Hal Higdon is a Contributing Editor for Runner’s World and author of 34 books, including the best-selling Marathon: The Ultimate Training Guide.


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Runner's World UK : The Marathon Weight - Loss Mystery


But many runners step on the scales just before race day and discover to their horror that instead of dropping pounds, they've added some. Here's why the numbers on the scales can go up during training and how to fuel yourself so you get to the start at an ideal weight. Marathon training almost always requires more mileage, which boosts the number of calories you burn as well as your appetite. Oops, you've just eaten 1,200 calories - a few hundred more than you burned on the run. The latter two take longer to digest, keeping hunger at bay and helping you avoid eating more than you should. The goal is to time your meals so that you provide your body with enough energy to fuel runs and your recovery, but without overdoing it. If you eat a meal two to three hours before a workout, your body will be fuelled for your run and you won't feel hungry - this eliminates the need for a pre-workout snack, which adds extra calories. In some cases the pounds you may have put on can help you on race day. This fluid (and the energy from stored carbs) will help ensure you're hydrated and fuelled on race day. Seven top tips on how to avoid the pounds and run your best race: Fuel up.within reason: Eat before a long run but you should have enough stored fuel for an easy three-miler, so skip the snack and just run. Hydrate before and after a workout and sip on calorie-free fluids throughout the day.


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Running Training Plan - Lose weight running


Why don't we offer downloadable training plans for weight loss? Running is a very effective way to lose weight; it can burn very high amounts of energy and hence calories. So, it's important to address the reasons for the energy imbalance, and we cannot do that by just offering you a generic weight loss training plan to download. If we focus on weight loss, then also, by implication, we focus on the fact that we've failed to control our weight in the past. Losing weight can become very disheartening and downright depressing, it's best if we don't think about it too much; it is not likely to place us in the positive, optimistic frame of mind we need if we are to embark on (and stick to) an exercise regime and healthy lifestyle. Why do YOU want to lose weight? These aims are much more stimulating and we can do so much more with them than we can with that old ineffective goal of losing weight. These are the reasons we do not offer downloadable training plans for weight loss. Discover how to get in shape and win the weight battle for good without the negativity and hardship that surrounds traditional weight loss methods.


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Hal Higdon Training Programs


"Strength helps at the end of a race when your form starts deteriorating," advises Vasto. "The faster you can move your arms at the end, the faster you can move your legs and the higher you can lift your knees, propelling yourself toward the finish line." To avoid putting on pounds, keep the pounds of the weights you lift low and the repetitions high. Vasto recommends lifting 50 to 60 percent of the maximum weight you can lift in a set of 12 repetitions. Practice the pelvic tilt where you press your torso back against the chair, or floor, to keep your back from slumping. Breathe Right: The worst mistake you can make while lifting is to hold your breath. "You’re not trying to see how fast you can get in and out of the weight room," says Vasto. Lie on your back on a bench (although you can also use the floor). (Remember to keep your back straight.) Hold the dumbbells with your arms extended, palms facing inward against your knees. (You can also do this exercise while seated.) Lower the weight behind your head toward the back of your neck, then return to the starting position. "The abs are your core of balance," says Vasto. Raise only to the point where you feel your stomach muscles tightening, hold then release, returning your back to the floor. In the forward position, your knee should be over your feet, forming a 90-degree angle. Strength is important, says Vasto, not only to improve your speed for running races, but it will make you feel good and look good and improve the quality of your life, throughout your lifetime.


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Half marathon training weight loss


It’s a well-documented fact that runners lose weight, and the more they run the more weight they lose. So setting the target of running a half marathon can be a great achievement in itself and the springboard to a lighter, healthier person. Very few people can just go out and run 13.1 miles with out doing a bit of preparation first. Typically a training schedule for beginners to run their first half marathon is around 3 months. In that time they will build up from walking for 30 minutes to running 10 or more miles in one go. The total distance run is likely to be between 150 and 200 miles. And the amount of energy burnt is proportional to weight – so if the starting weight were 50% higher (234lb, 16 stone 10 lb, 106kg), which is not impossible, the fat loss would typically be 15 pounds, just from the running. The exciting thing is that then, most people start to notice changes in their body, and they realise that they really can make a difference to it. And it seems that I’m not the only one as a reduction in appetite (aka ‘the Holy Grail of those who want to lose weight’) is widely reported as a side effect of vigorous exercise.


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Do Runners Lose Weight After a Marathon? - Healthy Living


If you enter a marathon to help you lose weight, think again. You may find that after your race, you lose weight – sometimes almost instantaneously. For every pound you lose immediately during the course of the race, you should drink between 16 and 24 ounces of water to replace it. If you underwent a carb-loading regimen in the three to four days prior to the race, you may have put on a pound or three. A side effect is weight gain because for every ounce of carb stores in your body you store about 3 ounces of water. The increased activity may cause you to eat more or at least make you feel like you deserve to eat more, which can cause you to gain weight gradually over the course of your training. You can lose weight after the marathon, but you’ll have to be diligent about your eating and cut out the indulgences for a while. One of the symptoms of overtraining is weight loss and lack of appetite.


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Skinny Meg : Weight Loss + Marathon Training


 Now that marathon training has come to an end I thought I would give you some insight on what it's done for my weight loss. I knew going into this that I was kinda making a choice to work on my speed and endurance rather than worrying about the scale, mostly because when I started training I was almost starting from the beginning because I stopped running for about 5 months when I was at the end of my pregnancy. Glycogen Stores: {a substance deposited in bodily tissues as a store of carbohydrates} So you carb it up, it's stored in your muscles, and used for energy when you run. Having a plan where I can work in more carbs and still lose weight has been a lifesaver. The days I really struggled were my 14+ mile days mostly because I was using 100+ carbs to fuel my run and that was all before I even ate a meal. My biggest fear with all this running was that I would lose my muscles, I religiously took my Catalyst before and after my runs. I continued with weight training 3x a week and scaled back my in gym cardio when my running got to more than 20 miles a week. I didn't follow my training to a tee - I think that 5 days of running is too much for my body {and knees} so I followed a 3 day running plan with my weight training mixed in, oh and soccer. It was nice to be accountable to someone else for a change instead of  *all of you* and it gave me structure when I wanted to say eff it. That scale is a damn hooker I'll tell you, when you are putting in so much effort with your food and your workouts you expect a little bit of a return on the scale, but WE ALL KNOW it doesn't work that way. Even if I didn't lose all the weight I wanted I still am damn proud of myself for getting up at 4:30am every Saturday to tackle those miles - I didn't miss one training run! I logged over 425 miles since September and come December 14th I'm going to put all that hard work to good use - You never run your first race again so I plan to give it everything I've got!


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How to Lose Weight When Training for a Marathon


How to Lose Weight When Training for a Marathon. You can lose weight during marathon training. You have to know how to lose weight during marathon training if you want to cross the finish line with a leaner, fitter body. The short answer to that question is “not necessarily.” You might be surprised to know that many new marathoners don’t lose any weight during training. So does that mean that it’s impossible to lose weight during marathon training? Marathon Running to Lose Weight. The key to weight loss during marathon training is balancing your training with your food intake. Do you think that running a marathon can be a reasonable weight loss strategy? If you choose to set a weight loss goal for your marathon training how should your training differ from most standard marathon training programs? Trying to match calorie intake with the number of calories burned is the underlying reason people fail to lose weight even when training for a marathon. Use these training tips from Dean Karnazes along with my quick tips for running to lose weight during your marathon journey.


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How to Run a Half Marathon to Lose Weight - Healthy Living


Training for a half marathon can help you get into excellent shape. Instead, it's the process of training that can help you shed pounds and get into excellent physical condition. According to the Mayo Clinic, you'll need about 300 minutes of aerobic exercise each week to lose weight, and training for an hour five days each week can help you achieve this goal. Step 2. Aim to jog a mile or so the first time, then gradually increase the distance of your jog as you get better and stronger. Instead, the goal is to increase your physical fitness and burn calories. Step 4. During this longer run, focus on running farther than you do during your normal workout so that you can build stamina for the half marathon. During your first week of training, aim for a mile or two, and increase the distance you run by a mile or two each week during subsequent long runs. Slowly increase the distance you cover during your interval training. The number of calories you'll burn from each day of training depends on your weight, muscle mass and overall health. Bananas and energy bars can help you maintain your energy throughout the half marathon.


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Marathon Weight Training : Stay Strong During Marathon


You just made the decision to start training for your very first marathon. But don't forget to schedule time for the weight room! Many runners begin to lose lean muscle tissue during marathon training, but a good weight training program can help you stay strong throughout your training and more easily transition to your post-marathon workouts. Of course your highest priority while training for a marathon is running. Schedule your weight training on days when you aren't doing long runs. Running long distances is physically draining, and adding weight training to that burden risks overstressing the body and decreasing your conditioning. It's imperative that you give your body the time recover and repair the damage done by intense training. When training for a marathon, your overall training volume should be kept low, and compound exercises are a must. The fewer exercises you can do per workout while still hitting all the main muscle groups, the better off you will be. Furthermore, if your upper body is weak from the start, it'll be faster to fatigue during your runs, which can impact your focus and concentration. Now that you know the priorities behind your routine, let's look at a sample workout.


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Why You Can't Lose Weight - Women's Running


Get the body you want without the headache by avoiding these common weight-loss traps. But believe it or not, training for fat loss and training for a long-distance event are (almost) mutually exclusive objectives. To successfully train for a marathon, you need to make your body extremely efficient at running, so you can complete 26.2 miles using the least amount of energy possible. To train for fat loss, you must avoid efficiency by constantly putting new demands on your body to burn the most amount of energy possible. If you are struggling with your size, never fear! You run long, thinking that you need to keep going for at least an hour to burn fat. Forget everything you learned in the 90s about the “fat-burning zone.” The latest research shows that running for less time is actually more effective for fat loss than running long and slow. * Using a treadmill, warm up by jogging for 5 minutes, then ramp the incline up (5 to 10 percent) and increase the speed to a pace that feels fast but not impossible (4 to 9 mph). Run for 8 seconds then place your feet on the sides for 12 seconds. You skip your post-run snack. After you work out, your body is crying out for fuel. If you skip this snack, your muscles can’t repair properly. This means the next time you work out, you won’t be able to go faster or work harder because you never recovered from your previous session. If you can’t push yourself progressively harder, your weight won’t change. Sign Up for the Women's Running Newsletter.


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How to Avoid Weight Gain After a Marathon


It's not uncommon for marathon runners to gain some post-marathon pounds. Some marathoners are so burnt out mentally and physically from the marathon that they completely stop running and working out. Try not to wait too long after the marathon to get back to running because once you get out of your running habit, it's tough to get back into it. Even though you'll be recovering for a few weeks, you can still do short, easy runs or easy cross training in the days following your marathon. You don't have to plan to run another marathon, but having the date of another race on the calendar will motivate you to keep running. Look for races in your area and running groups that are training for upcoming races. After you've completed a marathon, it's tempting to overindulge while you're celebrating your achievement with family and friends. Yes, it's fun to celebrate your accomplishment, but there are ways to do that other than eating and drinking. Once you start keeping track of your calories, you may be shocked at how many calories you're taking in, and you'll be able to identify areas for improvement. Being reminded of your marathon completion will help motivate you to continue running and you'll be inspired to fit into that marathon outfit.


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Train For A Marathon Without Losing Size - Men's Fitness


It may feel uncomfortable at first, but think of carbs as your fuel source, and when you're running on empty you're only taking a toll on your body." "If you're shedding pounds and size with your running regimen, it may be time to write it down. The only way you really know if your staying on track is if you track what you're putting into your body. "Have a schedule with your runs and make sure you're increasing your miles as well as your calories. Along with being consistent in your running schedule, be consistent with your training, too. Try to dedicate at least three days out of the week to weight training."


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