Losing weight after chemotherapy


Breast Cancer Patients Who Gain Weight After


Breast cancer patients who gain weight after diagnosis have worse prognosis. Many women experience weight gain during chemotherapy and endocrine treatment for breast cancer. The evidence suggests that women should monitor their weight and avoid weight gain after a diagnosis of breast cancer. Weight gain is common during breast cancer treatment. Nevertheless, for most women, the weight gain after breast cancer is modest - one study estimated that a weight gain of more than 22 lbs takes place in fewer than 10% of breast cancer survivors. One study reported that younger women and women who were underweight or normal weight at the time of cancer diagnosis were the most likely to gain weight and to experience increases in percent body fat. A large minority of women, including some whose weight was stable during treatment, also experience progressive weight gain in the years after treatment. However, note that one 2012 study reported that weight loss during anthracycline chemotherapy was associated with poorer survival in women with early-stage breast cancer than stable weight. Study that examined weight gain among women aged 40 to 54 who received chemotherapy reported that women of normal weight gained an average of 4.3 pounds during the first year. Greater weight gain was found among women who had lower body mass index ( BMI ) at diagnosis, had more advanced disease stage, were younger, were premenopausal, or who had been treated with chemotherapy or radiation treatment during the first six months after cancer diagnosis. Weight gain after developing breast cancer worsens prognosis. Study reported that women with ER+ disease who had a pre- to post-diagnosis weight gain (measured at approximately the two-year mark) of at least 10% were more likely to experience late recurrence (more than five years after diagnosis) of breast cancer. Study investigated the effects of weight gain on survival among 1,436 women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1996 or 1997. A study that included 5,204 Nurses' Health Study participants who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1976 and 2000 reported that among never-smoking women, those whose BMI increased by more than 2.0 kg/m(2) (median gain, 17.0 lbs) had 1.64 times the risk of breast cancer-specific death as women who maintained their weight during a median follow-up period of nine years.


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Managing weight gain - Information and support


We rely on a number of sources to gather evidence for our information. All our information is reviewed by cancer or other relevant professionals to ensure that it’s accurate and reflects the best evidence available. Our information is also reviewed by people affected by cancer to ensure it is as relevant and accessible as possible. Thank you to all those people who reviewed what you're reading and have helped our information to develop. © Macmillan Cancer Support, registered charity in England and Wales (261017), Scotland (SC 039907) and the Isle of Man (604).


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Weight gain - Canadian Cancer Society


Weight gain. Managing weight gain. Weight gain may occur in some people with cancer, but it is more common to lose weight during cancer treatment. Gaining a large amount of weight may affect your health and well being. Some people may eat more during cancer treatment, which can lead to weight gain. A lowered activity level can lead to weight gain. Some drugs lower metabolism, which can lead to weight gain. Other chemotherapy drugs cause the body to retain extra fluid in cells and tissues, which is called edema. This weight gain is different from the weight gain experienced from hormones and steroids, increased eating and decreased activity. Some drugs can cause fluid retention, which causes the following symptoms: Once the cause of weight gain is known, your healthcare team can suggest ways to manage it. Tips to manage weight gain. Try the following to help you manage weight gain. Choose clothes that are loose fitting and conceal the increased weight.


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Weight Changes - Managing Side Effects


However, significant chemotheraphy weight loss or weight gain may affect your health and/or your ability to tolerate your treatments. Some chemotherapy weight gain is caused by fluid retention in your body. What are some symptoms of weight gain and chemo to look for? Often you will be aware of weight gain just by the way you feel or the way your clothing fits. Try to maintain your normal weight, if you are not overweight. Drugs or recommendations that may be prescribed by your health care provider for chemo weight gain: If your weight gain appears to be from an increased appetite, your health care provider may recommend that you see a registered dietician who can help you with a diet plan that is tailored to your situation. If you have fluid retention, your doctor may recommend a diuretic. When to call your doctor or health care provider about weight gain and chemo: What are some symptoms of chemo weight loss to look for? If you have lost 5 or more pounds in a week, you should notify your doctor or health care provider about your chemo weight loss. Things you can do to manage chemo weight loss: Try to maintain your normal weight. Treating your chemo weight loss depends upon treating the underlying cause. Drugs or recommendations your doctor or health care provider may prescribe for weight loss after chemo: 


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Cannot Lose weight after chemotherapy


I have tried everything to lose weight for the last two years. Right after I began taking chemotherapy meds, and steroids I gained 15 pounds. I'm also taking Tamoxifen for the next 3 years so I have no production of estrogen and at 32 I'm in menopause. There are a lot of factors in play when you're working with chemo drugs and steroids or the aftermath of them. And what are you able to do for exercise? Both are excellent resources on nutrition and nutrient dense eating for health and weight loss. I am in the same spot you were.just off chemo (Taxol and Cisplatin) and steroids (decodron) and have gained 15 pounds. Very frustrating to gain weight despite watching my nutrution and calories! I am interested in knowing if you had success and what you found to be effective. Old, and 3 years post-treatment for stage III colon cancer. Toward the end of treatment and for a good year afterward, I had horrendous neuropathy in my hands, arms, legs and feet. So, here I am, doing intense cardio sessions 4-5 times per week, with weights 2-3, and I cannot seem to lose the 10 pounds I gained in the past few years. I was heavy until I was 20, and shed 50+ pounds, maintaining that loss until cancer wrecked my body. I didn't have cancer, but was on methotrexate and prednisone for 3 years for rheumatoid arthritis. And if you do your exercising in the morning before eating breakfast, you'll be burning fat reserves rather than the calories recently consumed.


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Losing weight after chemotherapy steroids - Doctor answers


Losing weight after chemotherapy steroids. Admitted hosp with fever after chemo. Also while getting my Chemotherapy for 2 hours, after about 3-5 minutes later, my body feels . They are getting there chemo, me NO WAY I'm drained while getting my Chemotherapy, yet after they take the ivy out . Is the estimating living years after successful treatment? The chemo side . During the chemo he was on large doses of steroids. After biopsy the doctors found out that this has not be spread to the rest of the body & can be operated . She may have her second session after 2 weeks. My mother in law finished chemo and radiation after being diagnosed with breast cancer.


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Losing weight safely after breast cancer treatment


Losing weight safely after breast cancer treatment. Many people put on weight during or after treatment for breast cancer. We look at the best way to lose weight safely and hopefully for good. If you’ve had breast cancer treatment and gained a few pounds there could be several reasons for this. But there’s a good reason to maintain a healthy weight besides the way you look. Lose weight for good. ‘Often they’re not based on scientific evidence’ says Lucy ‘and you’re more likely to keep the weight off if you lose it slowly and steadily. ‘Try to eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. You could try a brisk walk or Breast Cancer Care’s health and fitness DVD which includes an exercise class suitable for anyone after treatment. Eat at least five portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables a day. After finishing treatment including surgery and chemotherapy she decided it was time for her to lose weight. ‘For me losing weight was about getting control of my life back after breast cancer’ says Margaret who joined a local slimming club. ‘I eat lots of fruit vegetables salads and low-fat foods’ she says. ‘If you want to lose weight you’ve got to do it for yourself not because someone tells you that you should’ she says. Join us for a 5, 10 or 20 mile walk and help us be there for women with breast cancer from day one.


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Weight Change During Chemotherapy as a Potential


We sought to explore the association between weight change during treatment and survival, as well as the association between pre-chemotherapy body mass index (BMI) and survival. Weight change was defined as the ratio of body weight at completion of protocol therapy to pre-chemotherapy body weight. Change of body weight during primary chemotherapy was a strong prognostic factor for overall survival. Keywords: body weight, BMI, chemotherapy, ovarian cancer, survival. Little is known about the incidence of weight change among ovarian cancer patients. However, the impact of weight change on survival in this population is unknown. To our knowledge, there have been no studies of ovarian cancer patients that have evaluated weight change during primary chemotherapy as related to survival outcomes among ovarian cancer patients. Therefore, this study was designed to perform a retrospective examination of the association of pre-chemotherapy BMI and body weight change during chemotherapy with survival from ovarian cancer. Throughout the study treatment period, information was collected at each treatment visit (every 21 days for 6 cycles) regarding body weight, side effects and other treatment-related factors. Change in body weight during the treatment period and comparison between treatment groups were assessed using a Mixed model procedure, treating body weight as repeated measures. The extent of weight change during therapy was determined by comparing body weight measured pre-treatment (W 1) with body weight reassured at the time of the sixth cycle of chemotherapy (W 6), and a relative change in body weight was calculated as: [(W 6/W 1)-1] × 100%. For categorical analyses, patients were classified into four groups based on relative change in body weight: decrease < 5%, decrease 0-5% (0% not included), increase 0-5% (0% included), and increase > 5%. The linearity between weight change and risk of death was assessed using a graphical method as suggested by Homer and Lemeshow. Of the 790 patients, 404 (51.1%) were normal weight (BMI.


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Losing Weight on Chemo


The very treatment designed to kill cancer cells can also impact healthy cells in your digestive tract leading to unwanted weight loss. Chemotherapy drugs find and destroy rapidly dividing cells to include cancer cells as well as those that make up your skin, hair, and the tissues in your mouth, stomach and intestines. This is the time your body most needs nutrition, not the deprivation of it. Colon Cancer Can Change How Your Body Uses Food. Cancers of the gastrointestinal tract can impair your body's ability to absorb and use the nutrients found in food. Paired with the different treatments for colorectal cancer , this can compound your problem and make malnutrition a real threat. Chemotherapy Can Reduce Your Appetite. The side effects of chemotherapy can preclude your desire to eat. There are medications that can help with the nausea and vomiting, as well as the diarrhea and constipation. There are even medications available to help boost your appetite and regulate your digestive processes. They are the equivalent of gas in your tank - calories provide energy and nutrition for tissue growth and repair during chemotherapy. They also fuel your immune system so that it can continue to protect you from unwanted colds and viruses during your treatment. When your body does not get the calories that it needs to heal and repair, it has a protective mechanism that allows it to start breaking down your healthy muscle tissue for energy. This can further compound the weakness and fatigue that you may already be experiencing. If you will not be able to eat for a long time, your doctor might encourage intravenous feedings, which are called parental nutrition and can be administered through a catheter placed in your upper arm or chest.


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Weight Gain


Although people more commonly lose weight during cancer treatment, some people gain weight. However, significant weight gain may affect a person's health and ability to undergo treatment. Weight gain is an especially important health issue for women with breast cancer because more than half experience weight gain during treatment. Reports have shown that weight gain during treatment is linked to a poorer prognosis, which is the chance of recovery. The following cancer treatments may lead to weight gain: Some chemotherapy causes the body to hold on to excess fluid in cells and tissues, which is called edema . It may also cause menopause in some women, which decreases their metabolism, increasing the likelihood of weight gain. Steroids may also cause the loss of both weight and muscle mass, which is called wasting. Hormonal therapy for the treatment of breast, uterine, prostate, and testicular cancers involves medications that decrease the amount of estrogen or progesterone in women and testosterone in men. They can help find out the possible cause of the weight gain and the best way to manage it. Consider the following ways to address weight gain through diet and physical activity:


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Managing Your Loss of Appetite : Chemotherapy and Prostate


When you have chemotherapy (key-mo-ther-a-pee) to control your prostate cancer, you may have side effects or unwanted changes in your body. Things you can do to manage your loss of appetite. When you have treatment for your prostate cancer, you may be told to eat higher calorie (the amount of energy a food gives to your body when you eat it) foods that are high in protein. When you go through prostate cancer treatment you are told to eat in a way that helps build up your strength and helps you get through the side effects of your prostate cancer and its treatment. Make you lose your appetite. There are also medicines your doctor can give you that can help you if your loss of appetite is really bad. This may help your appetite if foods you like do not taste good. Why you may need to eat differently during your chemotherapy. Things you can do to help manage your loss of appetite. This knowledge will help you take better care of yourself and feel more in control so that you can get the most from your treatment. Calorie: the amount of energy a food gives to your body when you eat it.


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How to Gain Weight During Chemotherapy : 15 Steps


Learn how to prevent weight loss, put on weight during treatment, and understand the importance of a healthy weight. Your healthcare team wants to track your weight to determine whether or not you can regain that loss by the time you arrive for your next treatment. [4] Chemotherapy treatments can cause anticipatory nausea and vomiting, which happens when you experience the symptoms of chemotherapy the day before you get the treatment. Because the chemotherapy affects your bone marrow and immune system, you are more at risk for infections. This means it can kill the cells in your digestive tract, triggering weight loss. There are medications and choices you can make that will help prevent and alleviate some of the side effects. Weight loss reduces the energy and nutrients your body needs to recover. If you can prevent weight loss during treatment or gain weight after losing it, you'll improve the potential success of the chemotherapy. Eating with others, such as your family and friends may also help you eat more. You will be less focused on the side effects of your chemotherapy when you are around others.


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Weight gain - Information and support - Macmillan Cancer


We rely on a number of sources to gather evidence for our information. All our information is reviewed by cancer or other relevant professionals to ensure that it’s accurate and reflects the best evidence available. Our information is also reviewed by people affected by cancer to ensure it is as relevant and accessible as possible. Thank you to all those people who reviewed what you're reading and have helped our information to develop. © Macmillan Cancer Support, registered charity in England and Wales (261017), Scotland (SC 039907) and the Isle of Man (604).


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Hair Loss and Chemotherapy - Chemocare - Side Effects


Hair Loss and Chemotherapy. What is hair loss and how is chemotherapy related? Believe it or not, hair loss (alopecia) due to chemotherapy is one of the most distressing side effects of chemo treatments. Hair loss happens because the chemotherapy affects all cells in the body, not just the cancer cells. Hair loss does not occur with all chemotherapy. Whether or not your hair remains as it is, thins or falls out, depends on the drugs and dosages. Hair loss may occur as early as the second or third week after the first cycle of chemotherapy, although it may not happen until after the second cycle of chemotherapy. Can you prevent hair loss during chemo treatments? What can be done to manage hair loss due to chemotherapy? Management of hair loss focuses on your own comfort, or discomfort with baldness and on keeping your head warm if you live in a cool climate, as well as protection from the sun. Short hair - Cut your hair short if you are expecting hair loss during chemotherapy.


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How to Try to Lose Weight After Chemotherapy


Sarah Davis has worked in nutrition in the clinical setting and currently works as a licensed Realtor in California. Davis began writing about nutrition in 2006 and had two chapters published in "The Grocery Store Diet" book in 2009. The website Breast Cancer.org states that the medicines used in chemotherapy as well as the hormonal fluctuations it causes can lead to weight gain. Change your diet so that you are eating fewer calories and less fat than you did before you went through chemotherapy. If you eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables and low in processed foods like chips and candy, you will be able to lose weight. The website Breast Cancer.org states that women who exercise four or five hours each week have lower breast cancer recurrence rates, and exercise will help you lose weight by burning calories. The American Cancer Society states that exercising three to five days per week can also boost your immune system, which is essential after chemotherapy.


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All Weight Gain During Chemo? messages


I've read that women often gain weight, sometimes 20 or more pounds, during chemo. Does the weight gain occur because the chemo slows your whole metabolism down? I gained weight during my chemo for breast cancer. Although I think my metabolism changed somewhat, I think my weight gain was due to the fear that I was going to lose weight during treatment. The weight gain will not come go away on it's on.you'll have to work at it.but then, exercise is good for your overall health anyway! I have gone thru chemo 4 times over the past 5 years and weight gain seems to another 'wonderful' side affect. I never was as concerned over the weight gain as just getting better. I gained weight during radiation therapy as I was unable to do any exercise and all my well-meaning friends gave me lots of chocolate to cheer me up. When I was on chemo I lost a lot of weight as I was stressed and unable to eat. I put the weight on again after I finished chemo (I had lost 10kgs in about 3 weeks!) and it's slowly coming off again through lots of exercise, and not too many treats. Fat and oestrogen are not a good combination for breast cancer, so as soon as you are able, get back into action - it's the best way to make a lasting difference to your weight. Just remember, going through chemo is not much fun and you will probably feel pretty unattractive no matter what your weight is, so just sit tight and focus on the finish line.


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Breast Cancer Treatment and Weight Changes


Breast Cancer Treatment and Weight Changes. Your weight might change when you get treated for breast cancer . What Might Cause Me to Gain Weight? Menopause also causes you to gain more body fat and lose lean muscle. Another reason for weight gain is the use of corticosteroids. They can make you lose muscle mass in your arms and legs, and gain belly fat, too. Women treated with steroids may also put on pounds, but the weight gain is usually seen only after weeks of continuous use. Some research suggests that weight gain is also related to lack of exercise . When you get your cancer treatment , it’s common to feel stress and have some fatigue , nausea , or pain. Weight gain may also be related to intense food cravings . Do Other Breast Cancer Medications Cause Weight Gain? Many women taking tamoxifen have felt the drug was responsible for their weight gain.


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Did anyone gain weight during chemo from steroids? Did it


I just finished chemo and I have put on weight since I started. I will just see in time if the weight just drops off. I by all means haven't been able to continue that vigorous regimen during treatment and have gotten very discouraged. I by all means haven't been able to continue that vigorous regimen during treatment and have gotten very discouraged with my body. I am so over the bald and fat cancer body. I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who feels this way and am encouraged by others that their weigh came off fast :) I was very discouraged by the weight gain. I lost 25 of the 30 pounds and I have to admit I was not exercising on a regular basis nor was I dieting. Stay encouraged and be assured that you will lose those extra pounds once you complete your treatments. I am currently going through chemo and have gained 9 pounds so far and the weight is increasing. I hav an aunt who has been through this and she to gained weight and she says this is common but the weight comes off. I always call her and say to her i've gained weight and she responds that she gained weight but that is normal and the weight you can always lose. I wish you all the best with the weight loss and remeber your beautiful no matter what.


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Hair loss from chemotherapy


Don’t use brush rollers to set your hair. Don’t dye your hair or get a perm. Have your hair cut short. A shorter style will make your hair look thicker and fuller. Sometimes, either during the regrowth of your hair or when you are bald, your scalp may feel extra tender, dry, and itchy. Even a gentle scalp massage may make your scalp feel better. Here are tips to follow if you choose to cover your head with a wig or hairpiece: Shop for your wig or hairpiece before you lose a lot of hair so you can match your natural color, texture, and style. A sales person may be able to come to your home to help you.


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Cancer, Weight Changes, Muscle Loss, Fatigue


Treating and managing these symptoms can help you feel better and allow you to continue with more of your usual activities. These substances can lead to weight loss, muscle loss, and a decrease in appetite. They can also lead to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and mouth sores, which can affect your ability to eat normally, further contributing to weight and muscle loss. Fatigue is also a factor, since the decreases in exercise and other physical activities that happen when you’re not feeling well can also contribute to muscle loss. How are weight changes and muscle loss treated? These drugs can increase appetite for some people and may help to prevent weight and muscle loss, but they do not build up lost muscle tissue. What can I do to help maintain my weight and build strength? You can also try some upper body exercises while sitting in a chair – moving your arms up and down and front to back can help maintain flexibility. Making a fist and lifting your arms up and down in front of you can increase strength. Note the type of exercises or other physical activities you do and how they affect your mood and energy level. Nutritionists and physical or occupational therapists can advise you on other ways to maintain your weight and build strength as you cope with cancer.


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Weight Loss - Cancer Treatment, Oncology at Lifespan


Moderate weight loss is a normal and common side effect of cancer treatment. If you are overweight at the start of your treatment, a slight weight loss is not a concern. You don't have to be strict about fats in your diet during cancer treatment. If you lose weight during treatments, it means you need more calories in your diet.


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Weight Loss During Chemotherapy - Cancer advice from vfxbyjames.info


Have you ever wondered, will I lose weight during chemotherapy? Well, weight loss may seem like the silver lining of chemotherapy for some people, but not everyone loses weight with cancer treatment. Cancer patients on television and movies often appear gaunt and emaciated, giving the false idea that all people with cancer lose a lot of weight during treatment. The truth is that everyone responds differently to chemotherapy and there are a few different factors that play a role in how treatment will affect your weight. Factors Contributing to Weight Loss During Chemotherapy. When people do lose weight during cancer treatment, it likely due to the inability to maintain good nutrition. Chemotherapy side effects can cause loss of appetite, and the stomach upset (nausea and diarrhea) can greatly affect your eating habits, ultimately leading to weight loss. The cancer itself can also cause a loss of appetite . The goal during chemotherapy is to keep your weight stable. You can, however, focus on eating healthier, which hopefully will carry over post-treatment and allow you to reach your weight loss goals. Walking , yoga and other forms of exercise can be enjoyed by many cancer patients during treatment.


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Cancer survivors : Care for your body after treatment


Cancer survivors: Care for your body after treatment. Simple steps can improve your sense of well-being and your quality of life after cancer treatment. But beyond your initial recovery, there are ways to improve your long-term health so that you can enjoy the years ahead as a cancer survivor. The recommendations for cancer survivors are no different from the recommendations for anyone who wants to improve his or her health: Exercise, eat a balanced diet, maintain a healthy weight, avoid tobacco and limit the amount of alcohol you drink. Regular exercise increases your sense of well-being after cancer treatment and can speed your recovery. Do what you can, and remember that rest also is important to your recovery. While the evidence that exercise can reduce the risk of dying of cancer is preliminary, the evidence for the benefits of exercise to your heart, lungs and other body systems is substantial. This combination of foods will ensure that you're eating plenty of the vitamins and nutrients you need to help make your body strong. Talk to your doctor about what a healthy weight is for you and the best way to go about achieving that goal weight. You and your doctor can work together to control nausea, pain or other side effects of cancer treatment that may be preventing you from getting the nutrition you need. Control the number of calories you eat and balance this with exercise.


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Why so hard to lose the gained weight? - November 2006


Why so hard to lose the gained weight? Question from Mimila: I have gained about 20 pounds during the past 2 years since I was first diagnosed with breast cancer. I thought that one of the positive side effects from chemo and maybe radiation would be weight loss. I am having the hardest time losing weight even with heavy exercise. Unfortunately weight gain is more common that weight loss with breast cancer patients. Sometimes it's because of the steroids that are given during treatment, but some of the anti-estrogen medications that are given after the chemotherapy seem to not allow you to lose weight as easily as you may have been used to. There are often places in your diet where there are hidden calories that you may not realize are there, and with a little help you may be able to eliminate a few things and at least maintain weight if not lose further. She went to a dietitian and subsequently was able to lose a substantial amount of weight with her exercise regimen and a lack of peanuts! There is a great study that actually showed significant weight loss in breast cancer patients who combined the individualized approach developed by a dietitian with the support of a Weight Watchers group. The study looked at different combinations of groups, and it was only the group that had the individualized approach combined with the group support that lost the most weight and kept it off the longest. Especially during the holiday season when we're busier than ever, this may be the time to find a buddy or friend who is struggling with the same challenges, and you can support each other and befriend each other to get through this time.


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Your Body After Treatment - Dana - Farber Cancer Institute


How you can control your pain, if pain is a problem for you. Talking about your fatigue with others who have had the same problem can help you learn new ways to cope. You may have pain after treatment. You deserve to get relief from your pain, and your doctor or nurse can help you. These approaches have helped others recovering from cancer and may help you. Here are some tips to help you describe your pain to your doctor: Your doctor or nurse may be able to help you find ways to prevent and relieve lymphedema. If you find that these problems persist after cancer treatment ends, talk to your doctor about: Your doctor or nurse can help you deal with weight gain. Your surgery may have left you with no bowel or bladder control at all.


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Chemotherapy - Side effects - NHS Choices


Your care team is there to help you cope with the physical and psychological side effects. While the side effects of chemotherapy can be distressing, most don't pose a serious threat to your health. If you experience nausea and vomiting, you'll be given medication to help control your symptoms. Chemotherapy can make you more vulnerable to excessive bleeding and bruising. The symptoms of mucositis usually begin 7 to 10 days after you start chemotherapy. If you have serious problems eating and drinking due to symptoms such as mouth ulcers, you may need to be admitted to hospital, so that you can be fed with a feeding tube. During chemotherapy, and for some time after treatment has finished, your skin may become more sensitive to sunlight, so it's important to protect your skin from the sun . Your care team can recommend suitable medication to help control the symptoms. Living with the effects of chemotherapy can be frustrating, stressful and traumatic. Contact your care team if you have psychological and emotional difficulties. You can search the directory to find a centre in your area. In some circumstances, you may think that the benefits of chemotherapy aren't worth the poor quality of life, due to the side effects. For example, if chemotherapy offers no hope of a cure and can only extend your life by a few months, you may feel that the extra few months aren't worth undergoing treatment. Your care team can give you advice about the likely benefit of continuing with treatment, but the final decision will be yours.


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Chemotherapy and hair loss : What to expect during


Take the following steps throughout your treatment to minimize the frustration and anxiety associated with hair loss. Be gentle to your hair. Get in the habit of being kind to your hair. Consider cutting your hair. Whether you choose to wear a head covering to conceal your hair loss is up to you. Baby your remaining hair. Continue your gentle hair strategies throughout your chemotherapy treatment. Processing could damage your new hair and irritate your sensitive scalp. Chemotherapy and hair loss: Cover your head. Covering your head as your hair falls out is a purely personal decision. If you have radiation to your head, you'll likely lose the hair on your head. Different types of radiation and different doses will have different effects on your hair.


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Nutrition in Cancer Care - National Cancer Institute


The following can help patients who have mouth sores and infections: Eat soft foods that are easy to chew and swallow, such as the following: Nausea caused by cancer treatment can affect the amount and kinds of food eaten. The following may help cancer patients control nausea: See the PDQ summary on Nausea and Vomiting for more information. The following may help cancer patients prevent dehydration: Healthy diet and lifestyle habits can improve the quality of life for cancer survivors. The effects of diet and lifestyle on cancer continue to be studied. The effect of soy on breast cancer and breast cancer prevention is being studied. The American Cancer Society and the American Institute for Cancer Research both have dietary guidelines that may help prevent cancer . Editorial Boards write the PDQ cancer information summaries and keep them up to date. It cannot be identified as an NCI PDQ cancer information summary unless the whole summary is shown and it is updated regularly.


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Long - Term Side Effects of Chemotherapy - Susan G. Komen


Common long-term side effects of chemotherapy include early menopause and weight gain. Some chemotherapy drugs can damage the ovaries and stop regular menstrual cycles (amenorrhea). And, because the onset of menopause is abrupt, these symptoms may be more severe than with natural menopause. Maintaining a healthy weight after a breast cancer diagnosis is important and may improve survival [ 36-38 ]. Learn more about body weight and survival after breast cancer . Some people have cognitive problems after chemotherapy, including mental “fogginess” and trouble with concentration, memory and multi-tasking [ 40-41 ]. The link between cognitive problems and breast cancer diagnosis and treatment remains unclear. Symptoms may first appear with the stress related to diagnosis and treatment and then become worse after chemotherapy. Medications used to treat the side effects of chemotherapy (such as sleeping aids and anti-nausea medications) can also cause these symptoms. Heart problems and leukemia are rare but severe side effects of certain types of chemotherapy. These risks are related to the dose and type of chemotherapy drug. For most people with breast cancer, the benefits of chemotherapy outweigh these risks.


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Losing Weight After Breast Cancer Treatment


Losing Weight After Breast Cancer Treatment. David Margileth explains why many women gain weight during breast cancer treatment and how to safely and effectively lose that weight at the completion of your therapy. Margileth, MD: Oftentimes after breast cancer treatment, including surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, and reconstruction, etc. Much of this is probably due to the fact that she is not as active as she was before and may be obviously anxious about all of these treatments and may snack a little more, and often women will gain 10 or 15 pounds during this treatment period. Unfortunately, it is a calorie issue and I am not aware of any magical diet but different people respond to different dietary manipulations and with perseverance many women are able to lose that weight. We have many patients that use things like ________ for three to six months to help lose the weight, but the dilemma there is that they may often go back to their old eating habits and gain weight again. One of the interesting sidelights of breast cancer research in the last several years has been the fact that they are now couple of studies that may indicate there is a decreased risk of recurrence with exercise in patients who have been treated with breast cancer so, exercise we always recommend the patients, and that in combination with some moderate dietary restriction can lead to appropriate weight loss. One of the things that we see in this country is that many women want to lose 10 pound in 10 days or some totally unrealistic weight loss. Probably the most physiologic weight loss would be to have a goal of losing about three to four pounds per month and if one does that over a year, many many people would reach a very reasonable and appropriate weight. The problem is it is not easy but if one sticks to it with some exercise and some dietary restriction, it is certainly not impossible.


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Side Effects of Chemotherapy and Cancer Treatment


Fatigue is the most common complaint of cancer survivors. Cancer-related fatigue results from the cancer, its treatment, and treatment side effects. Chemotherapy may affect tooth enamel and increase the risk of long-term dental problems. Soreness or ulcers in the mouth or throat may result from cancer treatment. MD Anderson patients may be referred to a specialist in our dental clinic in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery if you have problems with your teeth, gums or mouth. Men and women whose cancer treatments are designed to eliminate the sex hormones that many cancers need to grow may experience the following side effects: Many cancer patients have problems with learning and memory during and immediately after treatment. Researchers have also discovered that the cancer itself may affect verbal learning and memory functions. One of the most difficult treatment side effects is neuropathy, a tingling or burning sensation in the hands and feet due to nerve damage. Certain types of cancer treatment can age or damage the heart, lungs, liver or kidneys. Certain drugs damage the lungs and airways. Osteoporosis can be caused by the cancer itself, cortisone-type drugs, treatment-induced menopause, cancer cells in the bone marrow and treatments that affect testosterone, which is crucial to bone health. Pain can be a side effect of treatment or from the cancer itself. The effects of cancer treatment on men include osteoporosis, incontinence, infertility, and erectile dysfunction or impotence. Many men and women treated for cancer experience sexual side effects.


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Nutrition Recommendations During and After Treatment


Nutrition Recommendations During and After Treatment. Cancer treatment can affect your appetite, eating habits, and weight, but it is important for people with cancer to maintain a healthy weight, get essential nutrients, and remain as physically active as possible. Although it is important for people with cancer to maintain a healthy body weight and eat nutritious foods, the side effects of surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy may cause a person to eat less and lose weight. Here are some general nutrition recommendations for people receiving cancer treatment. Nutrition counseling may help people with cancer get essential nutrients, such as protein, vitamins, and minerals into their diet and maintain a healthy body weight. You can also find a dietitian through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Dietary supplements, such as multivitamins and calcium. Low-dose dietary supplements, such as multivitamins, may be appropriate for people with cancer who are not able to get all of their nutrients through foods. Multivitamins are dietary supplements that contain generally all of the required daily vitamins, minerals, and trace elements; they may also contain some minerals such as calcium, magnesium, or iron. People receiving cancer treatment need to be aware of food safety, because some treatments may weaken the immune system and lead to an infection. Wash your hands before and during the handling and preparing of food. Read more about food safety during and after cancer treatment . Diet and nutrition after treatment.


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Do patients with weight loss have a worse


Do patients with weight loss have a worse outcome when undergoing chemotherapy for lung cancers? In patients with lung cancer and mesothelioma, weight loss is common at presentation and a frequent cause of patient concern. An alternative explanation is that weight loss is associated with reduced tolerance of chemotherapy, increased toxicity and the administration of less chemotherapy overall. The Lung Unit of the Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) has been treating patients with NSCLC, SCLC and mesothelioma with chemotherapy over many years. This study aimed to assess whether weight loss at presentation had an influence on the toxicity patients suffered from during chemotherapy, and on whether weight loss altered the amount of chemotherapy delivered. This study reviewed data that had been recorded prospectively on the RMH lung unit research database between 1994 and March 2001 for patients with SCLC, stage III or IV NSCLC, or mesothelioma and treated with chemotherapy. Patients were excluded if their weight loss status at presentation was unknown or the patient did not receive a standard chemotherapy regimen within 2 months of presentation. Patients who stated they had lost weight at the time of presentation were compared to those who denied weight loss. Weight loss at presentation was established and recorded by direct questioning of the patient during a preliminary assessment by the doctor at their first attendance at the RMH. Patients who reported weight loss were asked whether they knew their weight prior to the illness; by comparison with measured weight the extent of weight loss was estimated (less than or greater than 10% of preillness weight). Patients were weighed on each attendance for chemotherapy and at the outpatient clinic. Response rates were compared between the patients with weight loss at presentation and those without by means of Fisher's exact test. This study included 780 patients treated by the RMH lung unit between 1994 and March 2001: 290 with SCLC, 418 NSCLC, and 72 with mesothelioma, with a median age of 63 years (range 27–85 years).


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Late and long - term effects of treatment - Canadian Cancer


But knowing what the possible side effects are and what to watch for can make it easier to talk to your doctor about any problems you have after treatment. Cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy or surgery can injure nerves and cause pain and numbness in certain areas of the body. Many cancer survivors have problems with learning and memory during and immediately after treatment. If you’ve received high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the brain, you have an increased risk for problems with memory and concentration. Cancer survivors are at risk for bone and joint problems, especially survivors of breast and prostate cancers. Surgery or radiation therapy to the head or neck for head and neck cancers and certain types of chemotherapy can increase the risk of having mouth or teeth problems. Steroid therapy can increase the risk of eye problems, such as cataracts. Radiation to the neck as part of treatment for certain cancers, such as head and neck or Hodgkin lymphoma, can cause decreased thyroid function (hypothyroidism). Chemotherapy, radiation therapy or surgery can cause problems with the digestive system. Digestive problems, such as constipation , diarrhea or nausea and vomiting can occur during treatment, but they can also be a long-term effect for cancer survivors. Heart problems can occur after treatment for cancer. People who received high-dose chemotherapy, both radiation therapy to the chest and chemotherapy or those aged 65 or older are at increased risk for heart problems after treatment. Chemotherapy or radiation therapy to the chest may cause lung problems. Cancer survivors who received both chemotherapy and radiation therapy to the chest are at increased risk.


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Suggestions for Weight Loss after chemotherapy


I've been trying to do weight watchers and the weight doesn't seem to be coming off. Use up more calories than you take in and you will lose weight. I had the total opposite problem, I lost weight, almost 50# and had to try to eat things to gain weight. I am nearly off the steroids and that should help. You might refer to recent research that says all calories are not alike, and eating low-carb is better for weight loss than the older system of counting calories. And a couple of interesting things she told me that I'm trying different (been on weight watchers on and off for many years). I am struggling with the weight loss too. The chemo threw me into menopause and I have read that does not help with the weight loss. The only suggestions I have received for losing the weight is just eating more fruits/vegetables and exercise more. And i started a small weight loss challenge with my best friend, with a reward at the end of 3 months for whoever loses the most % of weight. I've always tried different diets (including Weight Watchers) and nothing brings down the weight. I've been working with a sports nutritionist for the last 6 weeks and have lost a grand total of 1.5 pounds.


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Eating to Lose Weight After Treatment


Why do some people with breast cancer gain weight? Many people gain weight when they are treated with chemotherapy and steroids. This weight gain may be because of the enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL), which is controlled by insulin. If LPL is on a fat cell, it pulls fat into the cell and makes it fatter. With less estrogen in the body, LPL can pull fat into fat cells and store it there. And like many people, you may be certain that taking a hormonal therapy medication makes you gain weight and makes it nearly impossible to lose weight. Many people believe that if you eat fewer calories than you burn each day, you’ll lose weight, and if you eat the same number of calories that you’ll burn, you’ll maintain a healthy weight. She’s probably going to lose some weight and get a lot more nutrients from her food. And counting calories is only one way to lose weight. The first thing to do if you want to lose weight is to talk to your doctors and a registered dietitian about a safe and sensible plan designed specifically for you and your needs.


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Losing Weight After Chemotherapy


There are no magic ways to lose weight gained from chemo or other cancer treatment, but What Nexters say it may help to focus on your overall health and the practical things you can do to lose weight. Your care team of doctors and nurses can give suggestions on how to lose weight after chemo and how to cope with the side effects of chemo. This could help you realize what you are putting in your body and help you track your reactions to different foods. Whatever kind of exercise you like to do, just get up and move. If you need motivation or help with your exercise, join the YMCA, a Livestrong Group, or another weight loss program. Apps can help you track the number of calories you consume a day and the amount of calories you burn. Try to keep things in perspective so that you don’t beat yourself up and have anxiety over your diet. My advice is eat right, exercise, see how you do and discuss any difficulties with weight loss with your oncologist.” - RMR. There are some apps and online sites that let you track your food intake. After chemotherapy you can talk to your care team, keep a food journal, track what you eat using a fitness app, keep healthy snacks on hand, exercise daily, join an exercise program for cancer patients, and do your best to keep a positive attitude that focuses on your overall health.


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Losing Weight While Undergoing Chemo


Chemotherapy drugs are one of the most common treatments for cancer, but they are not without side effects. Patients often experience weight loss while battling cancer and undergoing chemotherapy. Extreme weight loss may complicate the recovery process, although healthcare professionals continue to discover ways to lessen the undesirable effects of cancer treatment. Chemotherapy, also known as chemo, is a modern form of cancer treatment that uses potent drugs to attack cancer throughout the body. Side Effects of Chemotherapy. The powerful drugs used in chemotherapy cause a wide variety of side effects. Sometimes these side effects are severe, but the benefits of slowing the cancer clearly outweigh the risks. Nausea and vomiting are the most feared side effects of chemo, and indirectly contribute to weight loss in people undergoing treatment.


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Symptoms and Side - Effects - Johns Hopkins Pathology


Also, tumors of the pancreas often interfere with digestion which furthur contributes to weight loss. The anti-cancer drugs given during chemotherapy affect normal cells as well as cancer cells. When normal blood cells are affected, the blood cells may not clot well which may cause the patient to bleed easily. Infection caused by obstruction of the bile ducts and/or biological therapy (vaccines). Removal of part of the pancreas with the cancer may cure the diabetes. Surgery, radiation therapy, and/or chemotherapy are all a strain on the body and often cause fatigue. Obstruction of bile ducts can lead to infection in the bile ducts and possibly the liver. The last portion of the bile duct joins with the pancreatic duct in the back of the head of the pancreas and empties into the duodenum. This leads to a visible yellowing of the eyes and the skin. The cells of the digestive tract also divide rapidly and are therefore strongly affected by these drugs. Antiseptic and analgesic mouthwashes may be prescribed to numb the discomfort. Surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and/or malnutrition are all a strain on the body and often cause fatigue.


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