Does Colorectal Cancer Cause Weight Loss


Colorectal cancer - University of Maryland


Smoking and eating a high-fat diet also raise the risk of developing cancer. Some medications or supplements may help prevent the development of polyps or colorectal cancer. Many studies support the association between colorectal cancer and lack of exercise and obesity. Surgery is the treatment of choice for colorectal cancer, and is best when the disease is found at an early stage. Others may help reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Green tea and cancer in humans: a review of the literature. Alcohol consumption and the risk of colon cancer by family history of colorectal cancer. Intake of selected micronutrients and risk of colorectal cancer. Dietary fiber and colorectal cancer risk. Associations of sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, alcohol use, and diabetes with the risk of colorectal cancer. Systemic review and meta-analysis of the evidence for flexible sigmoidoscopy as a screening method for the prevention of colorectal cancer. Prevention of Colorectal Cancer: Diet, Chemoprevention, and Lifestyle. Nutrition and colorectal cancer. Carotenoids and colon cancer. Potential role of ginseng in the treatment of colorectal cancer.


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What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer


What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer? Topics Cancer Gastrointestinal Cancer Colon Cancer What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer? When symptoms do occur, they may include the following: Blood in or on the stool. Through screening it's possible to lower the cancer rates and, most importantly, lower the colorectal death rate. Symptoms of colon cancer include: Bleeding from the rectum. Blood (bright red or very dark) in the stool or toilet after a bowel movement. A change, or narrowing of the stool. Rectal cancer is cancerous tissue that grows along and invades the wall of the rectum. Symptoms of rectal cancer include: Bright red or dark blood in the stool.


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Why does cancer cause weight loss


The obvious answer is you're so damn sick and vomiting that you can't keep weight on - I get that. My doctor asked about the whole weight loss and didn't find it surprising that I lost weight when I made the diet changes. So again - what is it about CANCER that sometimes causes weight loss (other than the puking your food up bit)? But your weight loss seems to be due to nutritional changes/chemo,etc so I hope you are asking just for scientific curiosity? This paper reminds me of when I was working in ICU and one of the main markers for cancer cachexia (as opposed to just being thin) was the universal expression of temporal muscle wasting. And Belle, I believe you are just seeing the pay-off for all the hard work on your diet, dear. My degree and work is in the nutrition/dietetics field, and this one i can answer although my feeling is that your weight loss is not metabolic. There are several things that come into play for cancer patients as we all know, the biggest one being loss of appetite from chemo or just the stress or depression that can accompany cancer. I have worked with cachexia and it is much different than your garden variety weight loss.i didnt read the posted link, but there are some meds that can be tried for it, but often have some pretty severe side effects of their own. When weight loss is truly caused by the cancer itself and not just weight loss, it is for metabolic reasons and because tumors are their own life form, They require a blood supply and energy to grow, and they also release their own waste products. You're unlikely to notice the diversion of blood and nutrients, but sometimes tumors release chemicals that increase the body's metabolism (such as burn calories faster), which can lead to unexplained weight loss. Often times families will see their loved one losing weight fast and wasting away from cachexia and they will beg us for TPN or tube feeding, but what they dont realize is that these things in themselves loaded with nutrients often just serve to feed the tumor as well.


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The Mechanism of Muscle Loss in Cancer


The Mechanism of Muscle Loss in Cancer. Cancer wasting, also called cancer cachexia, is marked by weakness and the progressive loss of body weight, fat, and muscle. The cells then fuse with surrounding muscle fibers to increase muscle mass. In both mice and cancer patients, wasting was associated with muscle damage and activation of nearby stem cells. However, the stem cells became arrested in a semi-differentiated state and failed to fuse with the other muscle fibers. When arrested stem cells from wasting mice were removed from the tumor environment and placed in tumor-free culture, they were able to complete differentiation to muscle cells. When tumors were excised from wasting mice, the stem cells in the mice were able to complete their differentiation and fuse into muscle fibers. Consequently, the mice regained muscle mass. They found that overexpression of Pax7, which regulates muscle stem cell proliferation, impairs the stem cells’ differentiation to muscle cells in mice with cachexia. “By identifying agents that overcome the block and allow muscle stem cells to differentiate, it might be possible to restore muscle mass and enhance the quality of life of cancer patients with cachexia.”


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15 Cancer Symptoms Men Shouldn't Ignore


When you notice a change in the size, shape, or color of a mole or other spot on your skin , see your doctor as soon as you can. Have your doctor check any swelling that doesn't get better in 2 to 4 weeks, Meyers says. But if your problems don’t go away and you’re also losing weight or vomiting , your doctor may want to check you for throat or stomach cancer . During a barium test, you drink a special liquid that makes your throat stand out on the X-ray. You can take care of most cases of heartburn with changes to your diet, drinking habits, and stress levels. If that doesn’t help, ask your doctor to look into your symptoms. Heartburn that doesn't go away or gets worse could mean stomach or throat cancer . Talk to your doctor or dentist about tests and treatments. If you haven’t changed your diet or exercise habits, it could mean that stress or a thyroid problem is taking a toll. Your doctor can find out more with blood tests and tools that make detailed pictures of the inside of your body, like a CT or PET scan .


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Colorectal Cancer Association of Canada


What are the Symptoms of Colorectal Cancer? This is because colon cancer can grow for years before causing any symptoms. In the beginning of the colon, waste material is slushy and can easily maneuver around anything that gets in its way. A tumor in the rectum or far end of the colon can make it very difficult for waste to get by, thereby causing constipation. In the case of colon or rectal cancer, that obstacle would be a tumor in the latter part of the colon or the rectum. Sometimes a tumor causes a bowel obstruction, which is basically a road block in the colon. This leads to abdominal cramps that can be severe, especially if the blockage restricts blood flow to the colon. This is the most commonly experienced colon cancer symptom. A tumor that grows toward the end of the colon or in the rectum may cause a sense of fullness. In the minority of cases, nausea and vomiting can be symptoms of colon cancer. A pattern of gas and bloating may be an indication that a tumor is growing in the colon and occasionally causing a blockage. The right colon is spacious, and cancers of the right colon can grow to large sizes before they cause any abdominal symptoms.


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Sirtex - Colorectal Cancer in the Liver


Colorectal Cancer in the Liver. Cancer in the colon or rectum is called colorectal cancer (or bowel cancer). Worldwide, cancer of the colon and rectum is the third leading cause of cancer in men and the fourth leading cause of cancer in women. The frequency of colorectal cancer varies around the world. Cancer cells can also break away and spread to other parts of the body such as the liver and lungs. This means the liver is a common place for colorectal cancer to spread to. Colorectal cancer typically spreads to the liver before it spreads to other sites. Cancer has already spread to the liver in about 25% of people who are diagnosed with colorectal cancer. However, secondary colorectal cancer is often contained in the liver before spreading to other sites. Symptoms of secondary colorectal cancer in the liver.


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Symptoms and Tests : Colon Cancer


If the patient is diabetic , the patient should contact their primary care provider for instructions on how to take their oral medications and insulin during the day prior to the procedure as well as during the day of the procedure. The patient should also arrange for a driver to transport them to and from the procedure. What to do the day before the procedure. This is done by the patient altering their diet and by taking a strong laxative. The day prior to the procedure, the patient should eat no solid food. The standard medications of this type are Golytely, Nulytely, and Colyte. However, a total of 32 pills are taken the night prior to and repeated the day of the procedure. The day of the procedure, the patient will arrive at the endoscopy suite. The gastroenterologist (endoscopist) will speak to the patient. The patient should notify the endoscopist of: During the procedure the patient may feel abdominal pressure from air pumped into the colon. After the procedure, the patient may feel abdominal bloating but this will improve as the patient expels the remaining air that was pumped in during the procedure. After the procedure, the patient will be monitored in the recovery area for 30 minutes to an hour and then be driven home by their driver.


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Colorectal Cancer Symptoms and Signs


Colorectal cancer symptoms. Local colorectal cancer symptoms. If you experience symptoms of colorectal cancer for an extended period of time, it is important that you visit your healthcare professional. Systemic colorectal cancer symptoms. Systemic colorectal cancer symptoms are those that affect your entire body. Common systemic symptoms of colorectal cancer include:


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Colon cancer : MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia


Have a family history of colon cancer. Many cases of colon cancer have no symptoms. If there are symptoms, the following may indicate colon cancer: This is when the cancer is most curable. This may suggest colon cancer. This is the best screening test for colon cancer. Stages of colon cancer are: Stage I: Cancer is in the inner layers of the colon. Stage II: Cancer has spread through the muscle wall of the colon. Stage IV: Cancer has spread to other organs outside the colon. Stage 0 colon cancer may be treated by removing the tumor. For stages I, II, and III cancer, more extensive surgery is needed to remove the part of the colon that is cancerous. Radiation therapy is sometimes used for colon cancer. Cancer returning in the colon. Removing these polyps may prevent colon cancer.


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Overview - Colon cancer - Mayo Clinic


Colon cancer. Colon cancer can occur in any part of the colon. Colon cancer is cancer of the large intestine (colon), the lower part of your digestive system. Rectal cancer is cancer of the last several inches of the colon. Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called adenomatous polyps. Colorectal cancer. Colon cancer (surgical management). Colon cancer treatment (PDQ). National Cancer Institute. Colorectal cancer: Epidemiology, risk factors and protective factors.


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Weight Loss


Weight loss is common among people with cancer and is often the first noticeable sign of the disease. As many as 40% of people with cancer report unexplained weight loss at the time of diagnosis, and up to 80% of people with advanced cancer experience weight loss and cachexia, or wasting, which is the combination of weight loss and muscle mass loss. Weight loss and muscle wasting also often come with fatigue , weakness, loss of energy, and an inability to perform everyday tasks. Controlling cancer-related weight loss is important for your comfort and well-being. Consider asking your doctor about receiving food through a tube that goes directly to the stomach, which may help people with head and neck or esophageal cancers who are having difficulty chewing or difficulty swallowing . Megestrol acetate (Megace) is a progesterone hormone that can improve appetite, weight gain, and a person's sense of well-being. Steroid medications can increase appetite, improve a person's sense of well-being, and help with nausea, weakness, or pain. Other medications are being studied to help people with cancer improve their appetite and gain weight. Nutrition counseling may help people with cancer get essential nutrients, such as protein, vitamins, and minerals into their diet and maintain a healthy body weight. You can also find a dietitian through the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. These details can help you work with your health care team to find the best way to maintain your weight, or gain needed weight, during cancer treatment.


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Colorectal cancer - Wikipedia, the free


[4] Other diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease , which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis , can increase the risk of colorectal cancer. [1] Cancers that are confined within the wall of the colon may be curable with surgery while cancer that has spread widely are usually not curable, with management focusing on improving quality of life and symptoms. The signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer depend on the location of the tumor in the bowel , and whether it has spread elsewhere in the body ( metastasis ). For people with these syndromes, cancer almost always occurs and makes up 1% of the cancer cases. This gene is associated with the proliferation, invasion and scattering of colon cancer cells in cell culture, and tumor growth and metastasis in mice. Most (50%) colorectal adenomas and (80–90%) colorectal cancer tumors are thought to over express the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. Aspirin and celecoxib appear to decrease the risk of colorectal cancer in those at high risk. A positive result may indicate the presence of precancerous lesions or colorectal cancer, and should be followed by colonoscopy . The two most common sites of recurrence of colorectal cancer are the liver and lungs . In both cancer of the colon and rectum , chemotherapy may be used in addition to surgery in certain cases. The decision to add chemotherapy in management of colon and rectal cancer depends on the stage of the disease. In Stage I colon cancer, no chemotherapy is offered, and surgery is the definitive treatment. While a combination of radiation and chemotherapy may be useful for rectal cancer , [15] its use in colon cancer is not routine due to the sensitivity of the bowels to radiation. [109] From 2005–2009, the median age at diagnosis for cancer of the colon and rectum in the US was 69 years of age.


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Diseases/Colon Polyps and Colorectal Cancer


Colon Polyps and Colorectal Cancer. Colorectal cancer is cancer of the large intestine (colon), the lower part of your digestive system. Rectal cancer is cancer of the last part of your colon. What are the signs and symptoms of colon polyps and/or colorectal cancer? There are many factors that may influence the development of colon cancer. Colonoscopy: This is the most comprehensive and sensitive test for colon cancer. Treatment for Colorectal Cancer: Treatment for Colorectal Cancer: Surgery. Surgery is the main treatment option for colon cancer. Traditionally, surgery for colon cancer has been done through one large incision in the abdomen. Risks of laparoscopic colectomy for colon polyps or colon cancer: Because so many polyps are left untreated, colorectal cancer is now the third most common cancer in men and women.


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Signs and Symptoms of Cancer


Signs and Symptoms of Cancer. How does cancer cause signs and symptoms? The signs and symptoms will depend on where the cancer is, how big it is, and how much it affects the organs or tissues. If a cancer has spread (metastasized), signs or symptoms may appear in different parts of the body. This pressure causes some of the signs and symptoms of cancer. Cancer can also cause the immune system to react in ways that produce these signs and symptoms. If cancer is not the cause, a doctor can help figure out what the cause is and treat it, if needed. What are some general signs and symptoms of cancer? You should know some of the general signs and symptoms of cancer. Along with the general symptoms, you should watch for certain other common signs and symptoms that could suggest cancer. Sores on the penis or vagina may either be signs of infection or an early cancer, and should be seen by a health professional. The signs and symptoms listed above are the more common ones seen with cancer, but there are many others that are not listed here.


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Symptoms and causes - Colon cancer - Mayo Clinic


Signs and symptoms of colon cancer include: Colon cancer. Inherited gene mutations that increase the risk of colon cancer. HNPCC, also called Lynch syndrome, increases the risk of colon cancer and other cancers. Association between diet and increased colon cancer risk. Factors that may increase your risk of colon cancer include: African-Americans have a greater risk of colon cancer than do people of other races. Chronic inflammatory diseases of the colon, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, can increase your risk of colon cancer. Inherited syndromes that increase colon cancer risk. Genetic syndromes passed through generations of your family can increase your risk of colon cancer. Family history of colon cancer. People with diabetes and insulin resistance may have an increased risk of colon cancer. People who smoke may have an increased risk of colon cancer. Heavy use of alcohol may increase your risk of colon cancer.


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Weight loss and colon cancer - Diagnosed with Cancer


This weight loss simply happened for no reason and I think it has something to do with colon cancer. And before they were diagnosed I remember one thing –weight loss and the result was colon cancer. So I wonder now if it may be possible that my weight loss is colon cancer related. You’ve come to a good idea as I would say for one of the symptoms of colon cancer is weight loss. This weight loss is sure indication that there’s some tumor somewhere along the colon line that is blocking the bowel.


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Symptoms of Colon Cancer


Symptoms of Colon Cancer. The symptoms of colon cancer are a vague collection of gastrointestinal complaints that could be indicative of any number of other, less-serious health concerns - even gas or an overindulgence of your favorite food. Most symptoms of colon cancer appear after the cancer has already grown, which is why discussions about colon cancer symptoms usually include the topic of screening. Colon health screening tests, such as checking for blood in the stool or colonoscopies, facilitate the potential to find any unhealthy conditions within your colon before they become cancerous. Colon cancer symptoms may be representative of where the cancer is growing inside the colon. However, you can have colon cancer without experiencing any signs or symptoms of the disease. The most common symptoms associated with colon cancer are: Know what your "normal" bowel habits are, because they are different for everyone. Take note of the pain and try to detail the exact locations, severity, duration and a description for your doctor. The words you associate with your pain are important. Fatigue, or feeling inexplicably tired all of the time, is one of the most ambiguous symptoms of colon cancer. The occasional bout of nausea and vomiting may be associated with a stomach bug, but are not normal conditions in the otherwise healthy person. He or she will be able to point you in the right direction for screening exams, which are fairly simple tests to rule out or find problems in your colon. Depending on your insurance coverage, they may not cost you a penny, but will be worth their weight in gold if they can provide peace of mind that you do not have colon cancer or a recurrence of cancer. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Insurance and Medicare.


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Cancer, Weight Changes, Muscle Loss, Fatigue


Treating and managing these symptoms can help you feel better and allow you to continue with more of your usual activities. These substances can lead to weight loss, muscle loss, and a decrease in appetite. They can also lead to side effects such as nausea, vomiting, and mouth sores, which can affect your ability to eat normally, further contributing to weight and muscle loss. Fatigue is also a factor, since the decreases in exercise and other physical activities that happen when you’re not feeling well can also contribute to muscle loss. How are weight changes and muscle loss treated? These drugs can increase appetite for some people and may help to prevent weight and muscle loss, but they do not build up lost muscle tissue. What can I do to help maintain my weight and build strength? You can also try some upper body exercises while sitting in a chair – moving your arms up and down and front to back can help maintain flexibility. Making a fist and lifting your arms up and down in front of you can increase strength. Note the type of exercises or other physical activities you do and how they affect your mood and energy level. Nutritionists and physical or occupational therapists can advise you on other ways to maintain your weight and build strength as you cope with cancer.


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Do you have colon cancer? Learn the signs


Check with your doctor if you experience any of the above symptoms, regardless of your age. It’s important to be screened for colorectal cancer. Signs and symptoms of early-stage colorectal cancer are not always obvious or visible. Oftentimes it’s when colorectal cancer has grown into late-stage cancer or spread that signs and symptoms appear. Seeing Signs of Colorectal Cancer? When signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer appear, they will vary based on each individual. Not all cases of colorectal cancer will include rectal bleeding or blood in the stool; however, it’s a common sign and should alert you to speak with your doctor. It’s very common for other conditions to cause some of the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer like an infection, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and others. It’s important to know your body and speak with your doctor to discover the cause of your symptoms and find treatment. These conditions may be risk factors for colorectal cancer and your doctor can work with you to determine the best treatment plan for your current condition and the prevention of a future case of cancer.


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Colorectal Cancer - Colon Cancer - Rectal Cancer


Colorectal Cancer. Also called: Colon cancer, Rectal cancer  Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of the large intestine. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. Symptoms of colorectal cancer include. Tests include colonoscopy and tests for blood in the stool. Treatments for colorectal cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination. NIH: National Cancer Institute.


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An Overview of Colorectal Cancer : Signs


Cancer that begins in the colon is called a colon cancer , while cancer in the rectum is known as a rectal cancer . The exact cause of colorectal cancer is not known. What are the signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer? One of the early signs of colorectal cancer is bleeding. What are the stages of colorectal cancer? Colorectal cancer is described clinically by the stages at which it is discovered. Listed below is a description of the stages of colorectal cancer and their treatment. The standard treatment of a stage I colon cancer is usually a colon resection alone, in which the affected part of the colon and its lymph nodes are removed. A stage 2 colorectal cancer has penetrated beyond the muscular layers of the large intestine (stage 2 B) and even spread into adjacent tissue (stage 2 C). Usually the only treatment for this stage of colon cancer is a surgical resection, although chemotherapy after surgery may be added. A stage 3 colorectal cancer is considered an advanced stage of cancer as the disease has spread to the lymph nodes. For patients with stage 4 colorectal cancer, the disease has spread (metastasized) to distant organs such as the liver, lungs, or ovaries.


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Colon Cancer and Unexplained Weight Loss


Many of us wouldn't want to question unexplained weight loss. We'd just be happy to be losing weight! Though the prospect of losing weight without even trying may seem like a blessing, it really is something to question. Reasons for Unintentional Weight Loss. Possible causes of unintentional weight loss include depression, frequent diarrhea, hyperthyroidism (an overactive thyroid gland), infection, poor nutrition, AIDS, and cancer. If you're trying to figure out why someone else is losing weight unintentionally, you may also want to look into drug abuse, eating disorders, and smoking. Unexplained Weight Loss and Colon Cancer. You're unlikely to notice the diversion of blood and nutrients, but sometimes tumors release chemicals that increase the body's metabolism (such as burn calories faster), which can lead to unexplained weight loss. Medical Attention for Unexplained Weight Loss. (That would be about 10 pounds for a 200-pound person.) You should also call your doctor if you experience unexplained weight loss in conjunction with other potential colon cancer symptoms . "Colon Cancer: Signs and Symptoms." Mayo Clinic 17 Aug. "Signs and Symptoms of Cancer." American Cancer Society 28 Feb. "Weight Loss - Unintentional." National Institutes of Health 22 Jan. If you're trying to figure out why someone else is losing weight unintentionally, you may also want to look into drug abuse, eating disorders , and smoking.


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Can weight loss prevent cancer


We review and update evidence on obesity, weight gain and weight loss in relation to leading cancers since the International Agency for Research on Cancer report of 2002. In 2002, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reviewed the evidence for an association between body weight and cancer ( International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2002 ). Despite the increasing wealth of data on obesity and cancer, WCRF/AICR found sufficient evidence to review the association with weight gain only for postmenopausal breast cancer, concluding that a ‘probable' association existed. Limited evidence is available on the association between weight change and the risk of colon cancer. The IARC found limited evidence for an association between weight change and the risk of colorectal cancer ( International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2002 ). The IARC report concluded that obesity and weight gain are directly and positively related to postmenopausal breast cancer ( International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2002 ). In contrast to the findings for postmenopausal breast cancer, IARC found limited but supportive data for an inverse association between both BMI and weight gain with premenopausal breast cancer. In its 2002 review, IARC found insufficient evidence to draw a conclusion about the relationship between obesity and the risk of prostate cancer ( International Agency for Research on Cancer, 2002 ). In the 2007 WCRF/AICR report, insufficient evidence was found for body and abdominal fatness ( World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research, 2007 ). Recent evidence suggests that obesity increases the risk for advanced prostate cancer and prostate cancer mortality, but not the risk of less aggressive disease. The IARC found sufficient evidence and WCRF/AICR found convincing evidence that body fatness increases the risk of oesophageal cancer. Although IARC found insufficient evidence in 2002, by 2007 the WCRF/AICR had found convincing evidence that body fatness increased risk of pancreatic cancer and abdominal fatness probably increased risk. In 2002, IARC found sufficient evidence that obesity increased the risk of endometrial cancer. Limited evidence also suggests that weight loss may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.


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Unintentional Weight Loss as the Sole Indication for


Unintentional Weight Loss as the Sole Indication for Colonoscopy is Rarely Associated with Colorectal Cancer. One hundred thirty-six (2.1%) of these had unintentional weight loss; for 32 patients (0.4%), unintentional weight loss was the only indication for the procedure. CRC was diagnosed in 116 patients (1.8%), but CRC was not detected in any patients for whom unintentional weight loss as the only indication for colonoscopy. Conclusion: Based on our prospective case study, unintentional weight loss alone was not associated with CRC. Weight loss is used as an indication for colonoscopy. 5 In this study we examined the association between unintentional weight loss as a sole indication for colonoscopy and the risk for CRC. To examine the relationship of weight loss, age, and sex with CRC, multiple logistic regression was used to calculate an estimate of the odds ratio for each factor. Out of all colonoscopies, 136 (2.1%) had unintentional weight loss as an indication, and only 32 patients (0.4%) had weight loss as the sole indication for the procedure. Of the 136 patients with unintentional weight loss as an indication for colonoscopy, only 5 (0.07%) were diagnosed with CRC, each of whom had unintentional weight loss and an additional indication for colonoscopy (eg, gastrointestinal bleeding, anemia, or abdominal pain). The odds ratio for detecting CRC with weight loss was 1.9 (95% CI, 0.8–4.8; see Table 1 ). The results of this study demonstrate that weight loss as a sole indication for performing colonoscopy may not be sufficient. Our findings suggest that unintentional weight loss as the only indication for colonoscopy may not be associated with CRC.


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Colon Cancer Symptoms, Causes, Treatment


What are the causes of colon cancer? Symptoms of colorectal cancer are numerous and nonspecific. Other conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome ( spastic colon ), ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, diverticulosis , and peptic ulcer disease can have symptoms that mimic colorectal cancer. For more information on these conditions, please read the following articles: Irritable Bowel Syndrome , Ulcerative Colitis, Crohn's Disease, Diverticulosis , and Peptic Ulcer Disease. The right colon is wider and more flexible. It can even be called relatively spacious as compared to the rest of the colon. Cancers of the right colon can grow to large sizes before they cause any abdominal symptoms. The left colon is narrower than the right colon. Therefore, cancers of the left colon are more likely to cause partial or complete bowel obstruction. Cancers causing partial bowel obstruction can cause symptoms of constipation , narrowed stool, diarrhea , abdominal pains, cramps, and bloating.


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Grief, Bereavement, and Coping With Loss


Anticipatory grief may help the family but not the dying person. Studies showed that periods of acceptance and recovery usually seen during grief are not common before the patient’s actual death. For most bereaved people having normal grief, symptoms lessen between 6 months and 2 years after the loss. The grief process is personal. The positive effect on grief may be because church-goers have more social support . Most bereaved people work through grief and recover within the first 6 months to 2 years. Researchers are studying the treatment of mental, emotional, social, and behavioral symptoms of grief. In patients with complicated grief, the CGT was more helpful than IPT. Children and Grief. Children at different stages of development have different understandings of death and the events near death. Talking honestly about the death and including the child in rituals may help the grieving child. The following books and videos may be helpful with grieving children:


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Colon Cancer - National Library of Medicine - PubMed Health


For those patients with lymph node positive (stage III) disease, the recurrence rate can exceed 50% and adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of recurrence. In patients without lymph node involvement (stage I and II), the prognosis is quite good with surgery alone, with survival rates of 75% to 95% at 5 years. However, some patients with high risk stage II disease have a relapse rate approaching that of stage III colon cancer patients. Due to the effectiveness of systemic chemotherapy in stage III disease, a similar approach has been considered for patients with stage II disease. We performed a systematic review looking at all randomized clinical trials evaluating stage II colon cancer patients and adjuvant therapy versus surgery alone. Our review found that adjuvant therapy ‐either systemic or regional chemotherapy or immunotherapy‐ can improve the outcomes of stage II patients. In addition, the high risk features of the tumour should also be considered when contemplating the benefits of systemic therapy in patients with stage II colon cancer. Further investigation is needed to elucidate which patient and tumour factors can be used to select stage II colon cancer patients for adjuvant therapy. Strategies for detecting colon cancer and/or dysplasia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Patients with long‐standing ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease have an increased risk of colorectal cancer compared with the general population. There is evidence from case control studies that cancers tend to be detected at an earlier stage in patients who are undergoing surveillance and that these patients have a better chance for recovery.


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Death By Colonoscopy : Colorectal Cancer Risk Factors


Why: because antibiotics disrupt intestinal flora, the key protective factor from developing polyps and colorectal cancer. If you have hemorrhoidal disease and have to strain during defecation. Why: because mercury and other heavy metals in amalgam are carcinogenic compounds. Why: because you are affected by some or all of the above conditions. If you have a history of inflammatory bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn‘s disease, and celiac disease. Why: because epidemiological studies demonstrate the connection between the occurrence of colon cancer and disorders of carbohydrate metabolism. Why: because smoking increases the statistical probability of colon cancer by 30% to 40%. Why: because each scan increases the overall risk of cancer. Why: because it disrupts stool morphology, intestinal flora and exposes you to excessive radiation. Why: because colon lavage disrupts intestinal flora and compromises stool morphology. If you are experiencing nausea and vomiting accompanied by absence of stools or diarrhea. If you are a man and experience a continuous sexual urge or have unexplained difficulty urinating. Why: it may indicate tumor growth, colon obstruction, metastases or ascites — the accumulation of fluid in the peritoneal cavity caused by cancer.


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Colon Cancer : Causes, Symptoms and Treatments


Colon Cancer: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments. Colon cancer, also known as colorectal cancer, is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths in both men and women. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 51,783 Americans died from colon cancer in 2011 (the most recent year for available data). "Colon cancer is a growth in the colon that usually arises from a polyp. Excluding very rare types, colon cancer develops in the cells lining the inside of the colon and/or rectum. While there is no specific cause of colon cancer, certain factors can increase risk of developing the disease. Individuals with a family history of colon cancer, especially if more than one relative has had the disease, are at increased risk. Moreover, inflammatory disease such as other types of cancer or conditions such as ulcerative colitis can increase the likelihood of developing colon cancer. As with many cancers, colon cancer develops from the complex interplay of many factors, and no two individuals are the same. Symptoms that may indicate the presence of cancer cells in the colon or rectum include blood in bowel movements, weight loss, stomach pains and constipation or diarrhea. If a diagnosis of colon cancer is made, treatment is determined by the stage of the disease. Often, the remaining colon can be reconnected to the rectum, but if the cancer has also reached the rectum, a colostomy may be needed. In fact, daily exercise can improve life outcomes for people with localized colon cancer, according to a 2013 study in the  International Journal of Cancer . Information on local groups can be found through organizations including the Colon Cancer Alliance, Cancer Care and the American Cancer Society.


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Colon cancer symptoms, screening


David Lieberman about symptoms and screening for colon cancer. Colon cancer is the number two cause of cancer death for both men and women combined. Doctors now believe that cancers of the colon arise from polyps. However, not all polyps turn into malignant colon cancer. Without appropriate prevention and screening, symptoms of colorectal cancer may develop. In fact, if the cancer is confined to the wall of the colon, surgical removal may be the only treatment that is required. Some of us may recall that President Regan had colon cancer diagnosed and removed when he was in office. Although chemotherapy and radiation (if the rectum is involved) may be effective, the prognosis is worse once the cancer spreads outside the confines of the colon wall. Most of the time, blood in the stool is not due to cancer. Instead, for example, a person who always had a tendency towards diarrhea may notice a few weeks of new constipation, poor bowel evacuation, and perhaps more bloating and abdominal pain in the setting of a colon cancer blocking the passage of fecal material. If a cancer is narrowing the opening of the lower part of the colon, the stool may become persistently pencil thin with a decreased size and caliber (thickness). In the setting of colon cancer, abdominal discomfort usually presents with other symptoms described here, such as a change in bowel habits and/or anemia. If the pain is from a cancer partially blocking the colon, it is often associated with bloating, cramping and nausea. If the pain is from the cancer itself, it may be localized to one specific point in the abdomen and be reproducible with palpation.


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Colorectal Surgery - Colon Cancer


Age and health history can affect the risk of developing colon cancer. A family history of cancer of the colon or rectum. Tests that examine the rectum, rectal tissue, and blood are used to detect (find) and diagnose colon cancer. Colonoscopy: A procedure to look inside the rectum and colon for polyps, abnormal areas, or cancer. The stage of the cancer. The following tests and procedures may be used to stage colon cancer: In stage I, cancer has formed and spread beyond the innermost tissue layer of the colon wall to the middle layers. Surgery is the most common treatment for all stages of colon cancer. Instead, the doctor may put a tube through the rectum into the colon and cut the cancer out. Treatment of stage II rectal cancer may include the following: Treatment of stage III rectal cancer may include the following: Treatment of stage IV and recurrent colon cancer may include the following:


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Nutrition in Cancer Care


PCM in cancer results from multiple factors most often associated with anorexia, cachexia, and the early satiety sensation frequently experienced by individuals with cancer. Anorexia, the loss of appetite or desire to eat, is typically present in 15% to 25% of all cancer patients at diagnosis and may also occur as a side effect of treatments. Cachexia is estimated to be the immediate cause of death in 20% to 40% of cancer patients; it can develop in individuals who appear to be eating adequate calories and protein but have primary cachexia whereby tumor-related factors prevent maintenance of fat and muscle. The etiology of cancer cachexia is not entirely understood. Anorexia, cachexia, and nutrition. American Cancer Society: Nutrition for the Person with Cancer: A Guide for Patients and Families. Vigano A, Watanabe S, Bruera E: Anorexia and cachexia in advanced cancer patients. Shils ME: Nutrition and diet in cancer management. Ottery FD: Cancer cachexia: prevention, early diagnosis, and management. Zeman FJ: Nutrition and cancer. Also known as cachexia, this condition is one of advanced protein-calorie malnutrition and is characterized by involuntary weight loss, muscle wasting, and decreased quality of life.[ 1 , 2 ] Tumor-induced weight loss occurs frequently in patients with solid tumors of the lung, pancreas, and upper gastrointestinal tract and less often in patients with breast cancer or lower gastrointestinal cancer. Although an individual’s nutritional status may be compromised initially by the diagnosis of cancer, thorough nutritional screening procedures and the timely implementation of nutritional therapies may markedly improve the patient’s outcome. Several approaches to the treatment of cancer cachexia have been reported, and a variety of agents have been studied for their effects on appetite and weight. Table 1 lists several medications that have been proposed to treat the symptoms of cancer cachexia.[ 13 ] However, the management of cachexia remains a complex challenge, and integrated multimodal treatment targeting the different factors involved has been proposed.


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Colon Cancer Causes, Symptoms, Treatment - Colon Cancer


Cancer of the colon and rectum can exhibit itself in several ways. You may notice bleeding from your rectum or blood mixed with your stool. Blood in the stool may be less evident, and is sometimes invisible, or causes a black or tarry stool. You may notice the following symptoms of bowel obstruction:


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Colon Cancer


What are the symptoms of colon cancer? When colon cancer is suspected, either a lower GI series (barium enema X-ray) or colonoscopy is performed to confirm the diagnosis and locate the tumor. If colon polyps are found, they usually are removed through the colonoscope and sent to the pathologist. The pathologist examines the polyps under the microscope to check for cancer. Colonoscopy is the best procedure to use when cancer of the colon is suspected. Removal of precancerous polyps prevents the future development of colon cancer from these polyps. It can be performed after a barium enema has raised questions about the left colon. Polyp removal and cancer biopsy can be performed through the sigmoidoscope. If colon cancer is confirmed by a biopsy, staging examinations are performed to determine whether the cancer has already spread to other organs. It is sometimes found in high levels in patients with colorectal cancer, especially when the disease has spread.


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Obesity, Weight, and Cancer Risk


Obesity, Weight, and Cancer Risk. People who are overweight or obese have a higher risk of many serious health conditions, including type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Understanding weight gain and cancer risk. Several studies have explored why being overweight or obese may increase cancer risk and growth. Chronic, low-level inflammation, which is more common in people who are obese and is linked with an increased cancer risk. How your weight changes throughout your life may also affect your risk for cancer. Losing and regaining weight repeatedly. Research suggests that maintaining a healthy weight is associated with a lower risk of cancer and of cancer recurrence in cancer survivors. To control weight gain, be aware of what you eat and how much you exercise. Eat and drink only as many calories as you need to maintain a healthy weight and support your level of physical activity. If you are currently overweight or obese, it is best to start by taking steps to lose weight through nutrition and exercise. What programs and treatments are available to help me lose weight?


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Cancer and Weight Loss as a Symptom


Unexplained weight loss can be a symptom of many conditions - cancer included. Weight Loss and Cancer. Unintentional weight loss can be a symptom of cancer , though vague and non-specific. When To See Your Doctor About Weight Loss. Generally, you should see your doctor if you have lost 5 percent of your body weight within six months or less and have done so without modifying your diet or exercising. Your doctor may ask you several questions to help identify why you are losing weight. Your doctor will want to know the basics like when you first started to lose weight and how much you have lost. Remember, Weight Loss Doesn't Mean You Have Cancer. You may also get a better understanding of what your symptoms, like weight loss , may mean by using the About.com Symptom Checker , an interactive health education tool.


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Bowel cancer - NHS Choices


Bowel cancer  Bowel cancer is a general term for cancer that begins in the large bowel. About 1 in every 20 people in the UK will develop bowel cancer in their lifetime. The three main symptoms of bowel cancer are blood in the stools (faeces), changes in bowel habit – such as more frequent, looser stools – and  abdominal (tummy) pain . As almost 9 out of 10 people with bowel cancer are over the age of 60, these symptoms are more important as people get older. Most people who are eventually diagnosed with bowel cancer have one of the following combination of symptoms: The symptoms of bowel cancer can be subtle and don't necessarily make you feel ill. Read more about the  symptoms of bowel cancer . Read more about diagnosing bowel cancer . Read more about the causes of bowel cancer and preventing bowel cancer . Bowel cancer screening. Read more about screening for bowel cancer . Read more about how bowel cancer is treated and living with bowel cancer .


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