Carb Fat Protein Ratio For Bodybuilding


Carb/Protein/Fat ratio - Calorie Count


In doing so, I realized that there is a lot of varying advice on what the correct ratio should be of carbs/protein/fat. Which ratio should I be using for the best results? The ratio that will work best for your weight loss goals will depend on your body type, metabolism and activity level. That unfortunately means experimenting untill you figure out what works best for you. If that's the case for you I would shoot for the lower carb ratio and an emphasis on lean protein and healthy fats. If you have a normal metabolism and didn't have a persistant weight problem pre-pregnancy a more equalized ratio would probably work fine for you. Try a few different ratios till you find one that works for you, and try to eat mainly "whole foods"/unprocessed foods to get the most nutrition for your calories. The answer is that there really isn't one "right" ratio for everybody. It depends on what your goals and tolerances are. If you think about it, the standard common sense advice about healthy diets is to eat your vegetables. From there, you'd get a good sense of whether your ratio is higher on the carb or protein side.


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Protein, Carb, and Fat Ratios


Here’s why: It’s almost impossible to eat too much protein, because due to the Leptin effect (You remember Leptin, right? Because up to 50% of calories in your diet from healthy fat is good for you, and quite frankly, it is very difficult to consume that much healthy fat in your diet. Unless you’re eating lard out of the bucket with an ice cream scoop, you shouldn’t have to restrict your good fat consumption at all. Since you are not eating any starchy vegetables or carbs (including sugar, sweeteners, and alcohol), your only risk of eating too much carbs comes from possibly eating too much fruit. If you limit your fruit consumption to half a cup to a cup a day, it doesn’t matter how many non-starchy vegetables you eat, so long as you eat your protein and fat you simply cannot stuff your tummy with too many vegetables to make you fat. Follow this simple recipe for success and you will keep your Protein-Fat-Carb ratio in good order. For the geeks among you who REALLY want to know and who want to be super precise, let’s geek out here. Let’s say you are a 140 pound woman and your body fat percentage is 20%. If we do the math, that means you have 28 pounds of body fat, and 112 pounds remaining of lean body mass. With this lean body mass, you should aim for 112 grams of protein a day.


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Ask the Dietitian : What’s the Best Carb, Protein and Fat


Carbohydrates are an important source of fuel for our muscles during exercise and are the only source of energy for our brain and red blood cells. Fat is equally important, playing major roles in everything from brain function to cell structure, but if you’re trying to lose weight, it may not hurt to trade some carbohydrates and/or fat calories for a boost in protein. Calorie for calorie, protein has the most metabolic benefits for weight loss: it increases satiety, stimulates energy expenditure and preserves muscle, which unfortunately is used for energy along with fat during weight loss. For most, it is perfectly safe to adjust carbohydrate, protein and fat consumption to optimize the diet for weight loss. You may find it beneficial to trade a percentage of your calories from carbohydrates or even fat, for protein calories. As a jumping off point, let’s review the current recommendations for carbohydrates, protein and fat, as well as My Fitness Pal’s default goals for these nutrients: This is important because if we do not get enough carbohydrates from our diet, the body will break down protein (which it can turn into glucose) to maintain blood sugar levels and fuel the brain and red blood cells. My Fitness Pal’s current default goals distribute calories as follows: 50% from carbohydrates, 20% from protein and 30% from fat. To help you visualize some modest modifications, here’s a table summarizing a couple of options for safely cutting back on calories from carbohydrates and fat while increasing protein intake to optimize the diet for weight loss: For those primarily interested in cutting calories from carbohydrates, a 1,200-calorie diet with 45% of calories from carbohydrates would provide 135 grams of carbohydrates, thus meeting the RDA of 130 grams. Hypothetically speaking, a 1,300-calorie diet with as few as 40% calories from carbohydrates (below the recommended minimum) would still meet the RDA for carbohydrates. If you’re currently using My Fitness Pal’s default goals and want to trade some carb calories for protein, the 45:25 carbohydrate-to-protein ratio may be a good place to start.


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Carbohydrates, Proteins and Fats–What ratio


There is however optimal ratios for different scenarios I,e fat loss or mass gain. Here are the ones that worked for me! Whether you are looking for fat loss or mass gain. 1g of Carbohydrates = 4 Calories. The general rules for taking protein, for both mass gain or fat loss is between 1.54g/kg – 2.2g/kg (0.7-1g/lbs) of bodyweight. 1g of Protein = 4 Calories. The rest of your calories to make up your caloric intake should come from fat. 1g of Fat = 9 Calories. Macronutrient Ratios for Fat Loss. 200g x 4 Calories/protein = 800 Calories protein. So we have 1000 Calories accounted for, we need 1762 Calories to make up and that all comes from tasty fats! (1762 Calories) / (9 Calories/g) = 196g of Fat. Our food should therefore come from about 10% Carbs / 30% Protein / %60 Fat and have a calorie deficit of 500 calories per day! For a given week of this caloric restriction I need, 2762×7=19,334 Calories per week. Calculate your BMR, up the carbohydrates to about 100g/day, up the Protein to 2.2g/kg and then do the calculation again.


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Protein for Bodybuilding : How Much Is Too Much


In the US, the Department of Agriculture (USDA) sets the guidelines for nutrients like protein as well as other major vitamins and minerals. For most people of average weight, the protein intake is set at less than 70 grams each day. The situation is encouraged by the extraordinary vigor of the powdered protein supplement industry in the weight training and bodybuilding markets. I'll take you through an example to demonstrate the dynamics of protein requirements for weight training. Macronutrient percentages, for example a diet of 25% protein. Absolute amount of protein per day, 160 grams for example. Protein by body weight. While the protein requirements for adult males are less than one gram per kilogram of body weight per day, estimates for athletes based on studies that evaluate nitrogen balance, a product of protein breakdown, suggest that up to 2.5 grams/kilogram/day may be required in exceptional circumstances. The macronutrients are carbohydrate, fat and protein - essential elements in human nutrition. For example, a 100 kilogram bodybuilder eating about 2 grams/protein/kilogram/day would eat 200 grams of protein each day. Even in a diet of 4000 calories per day - not unusual for heavy training - this diet is only 20 percent protein. Please note the 200 grams refers to pure protein and not the weight of whole food. Protein by daily intake. Extreme Protein Recommendations for Bodybuilding. A few bodybuilding and weight training coaches recommend protein intakes of 40 percent of energy; for example 40% protein, 40% carbohydrate; 20% fat.


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The Carb to Protein Ratio Diet - Project Swole


I have written, on numerous occasions, about reducing your carbohydrate intake and increasing your protein intake to lose fat and maintain muscle mass when dieting. The protein is a little lower than I usually recommend and the carbs are definitely higher than I recommend for most fat loss diets. That being understood, this diet plan is based on a study at the University of Illinois and aims only at maintaining the proper ratio of carbs to protein for ideal fat loss and muscle retention. For maintaining muscle mass, you can use the bodyweight column based on your current weight. For gaining muscle or losing fat you can use the bodyweight column based on your desired bodyweight. To customize this chart for your own needs and to get more accurate numbers: To gain muscle with a fast metabolism, start with your desired bodyweight and multiply by 14 to get total daily calories. To gain muscle with a slow metabolism, start with your current bodyweight and multiply by 13 to get total daily calories. To lose fat with a fast metabolism, start with your current bodyweight and multiply by 13 to get total daily calories. To lose fat with a slow metabolism, start with your desired bodyweight and multiply by 12 to get total daily calories. Multiply total daily calories by .0751 to get total protein grams, multiply by 4 to get total protein calories. Multiply total protein grams by 1.4 to get total carbohydrate grams, multiply by 4 to get total carbohydrate calories. For example, you may need to increase protein for gaining muscle or decrease carbs for losing fat, but those adjustments should be based on your results after the first couple weeks of dieting. Increasing your protein intake and decreasing your carbohydrate intake will help you to maintain (or even gain) muscle while losing fat on a weight loss diet.


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Beginning Nutrition : The Facts About Protein, Carbs and Fat


This means the proper intake of calories, the proper ratio of macro nutrients - protein , carbohydrates , and fats - and the proper timing of these macro nutrients. Protein is used by the body to build, repair and maintain muscle tissue. Protein is essential for growth and the building of new tissue as well as the repair of broken down tissue - like what happens when you work out. When you hear the term "positive nitrogen balance," it refers to being in a state of having enough protein available for the needs of the body and the needs of building muscle. This statement alone defines the key need for protein when lifting weights. For the most part, we are told to eat sufficient protein (every 3-4 hours) to maintain a positive nitrogen balance because your body is actually in an anabolic, or building up phase in this state, where a negative nitrogen balance, from lack of adequate protein, indicates a catabolic, or tearing down state. This is one reason why protein (and eating enough throughout the day) is important: lack of adequate protein, and your body begins to break down tissue (read: muscle) to meet its daily protein needs. The other part of getting the most out of your protein intake and thereby maintaining a positive nitrogen balance is carb and fat intake; both are needed in reasonable amounts to insure protein synthesis. As far as powders are concerned, whey protein is the best quality, meaning your body will absorb and use more of it. Note the protein, carb and fat per serving. The timing of protein is the key to maintaining a positive nitrogen balance and staying in an anabolic state. Other than that, there are some critical times to take in protein - first thing in the morning, with some simple carbohydrates because you have not eaten since the evening before and your body is in a catabolic state. You should also be sure to take in a protein shake with fast carbohydrates - like fruit - about 1 hour before you train and you should take in a similar shake after you train - this should be, by the way, 40-60 grams of protein and about the same in carbohydrates.


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Low Carb Dieting : Will It Get You Ripped or Leave You Flat


It has even been argued that by replacing carbohydrates with fats, and keeping protein consumption consistent (the so called ketogenic diet, during which the user is thought to become more efficient at mobilizing fats for energy while their insulin levels are down-regulated to further lessen fat storage), we can become leaner and more muscular. The more he lowered his carbs, the weaker he became, the worse his recovery from exercise was, and the more muscle size he lost. He reported to FLEX Magazine that upon trying the ketogenic diet his strength “went to hell” and, consequently, he never again tried a low carb approach. As the muscles’ most readily useable and efficient fuel source, carbs, in complex form primarily, are of fundamental importance when training with full force. But low strength and a lack of muscular fullness is not the only potential problem facing those whose carbohydrate intake is minimal at best. Though the jury is still out on whether a high fat, low carb regime will enhance muscle size and strength for all who try it, carbohydrates have for many decades been known for their protein sparing effect. The more carbs we have on board, the less likely it is that protein will be converted into carbohydrates (gluconeogenesis) to fuel physical and mental processes. Carbohydrates provide fuel for our brain; without enough carbs of the right kind (over-refined simple sugars can deplete energy), we feel groggy and tired. Following a diet plan with roughly 45% carbs will enable us to maintain a low fat eating plan without binging on the wrong foods. The problem with high fat diet plans is that the body is so conditioned to eating carbs for energy that it is extremely hard to eliminate them entirely; eating the high saturated fat and cholesterol laden foods included in ketogenic diets, without the carbs which so often accompany such foods, is not sustainable for many. You want to cut out the bad carbs, and consume the right carbs at the right time in the proper amounts. Increase the wrong carbs, at the wrong time, in the wrong amounts, and it’s absolutely true, your body fat will increase. By eating most of your carbs over the first nine hours of the day, the physical activity that takes place around this time will ensure blood sugar modulation is optimal and fat storage is less likely. By consuming simple sugar carbs (30 – 40 g) directly after training, the muscles’ greater receptivity to them will ensure they are stored in muscle tissue, not converted to fat (which may occur if taken at other times of the day).


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Carb, Fat, Protein Ratios


I'm trying to lose weight and need some help figuring out the best ratio of carbs, fat and protein? Is 50% protein, 30% carbs, and 20% fats a good ratio? Carbs and Fats are the two numbers one may play with. If you are worried about too many carbs replace them with calories from Fat or the other way around if you want low fat dieting. How will I know if the carbs and fat need to be adjusted? If you feel better on more carbs, then go with that. Protein is the next important and carbs and fat are your preferences. I don't remember what my are set to but I know it's higher fat and protein. 70 fat 10 carbs 20 protein. Honestly thinking about dropping the carbs a little lower, raising the fat a tiny bit, and putting the rest towards protein. You can divide the rest as you see fit between carbs and fats, keeping in mind that fats will help you feel satiated so that you will not want to eat so much, and are important for vitamin absorption and lots of other functions in the body. And you can't have fat storage if you are in a calorie deficit. Also, if you are concerned about insulin, then I hate to tell you that protein and exercise can stimulate it too. Fat ranges from .35-.6g per lb of lean body mass and the rest is carbs.


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So what is an ideal ratio of fat, protein and carbs


So what is an ideal ratio of fat, protein and carbs? Proteins and amino acids are not unnecessary and you need the amount that your musculo-skeletal system requires, but this too is an amount, not a ratio. He advises that 1.5 to 2.0 grams per kg of ideal weight for protein. Generally speaking, if you're looking for Nutritional Ketosis, the ratios are 65-80% total calories from fat, and protein up to your personal needs (as the formulas above indicate). Atkins tends to fall on the 65% side of that for many of the menus in the book, and in OWL and beyond those fat ratios can fall a bit, depending on the needs of the person. Whatever food helps you lose weight and maintain that loss is the ideal for you. People talk about drinking tons of hwc and coconut oil and eating the visible fat off of steaks and enjoying that- that's not for me. I want 80% of the diet to be fat so I guess after fat and protein are counted the rest can be carbs. Generally aiming for 60-65% fat is enough to satiate most people and not have them overdoing protein or carbs. I absolutely agree with this, and I think that the online trackers are responsible for people being so concerned with percentages. That never allows for 'high fat,' but my body seems to prefer this WOE, and I feel best eating this way. I have been doing a higher fat woe for a number of months now and couldn't tell you what the percentage of fat is in my daily food. If on the otherhand you wish to do a higher fat, moderate protein, low carb plan - there is no reason not to.


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Vegan Bodybuilding and Fitness • View topic - Protein / carb


Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 2:11 pm  So when I'm trying to get protein I'm already getting the 2 others, add to that some oil and a lot of fruits + complex carbs (rice, wheat, oats.) and bam! Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 2:40 pm  For protein 1g is minimum and 2g max (I try to hit about 1.5) IMO. Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 3:26 pm  Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 4:49 pm  Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 5:15 pm  This is a sample, not every day is the same, expect for the morning shake and the dates. I think this does not have a lot of fat, but at the same time for breakfast and post workout it may be a good thing. That was one easy way of getting protein for snacks, but it does not sound like a good plan anymore.


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The Best Ratio of Carbs, Protein and Fat


The Best Ratio of Carbs, Protein & Fat. Macronutrients - the big three of protein, carbohydrates and fat - are the cornerstone of any dietary plan. The best ratio for you depends on age. Children 1 to 3 years old should have a diet that contains 45 percent to 65 percent carbohydrate, up to 20 percent protein and 30 percent to 40 percent fat. From age 4 to 18, the percentage of carbohydrate stays the same, but protein increases to as much as 30 percent of the diet, while fat should be not more than 35 percent of the diet. The proportion of carbohydrate is also the same for adults, but protein should be 10 percent to 35 percent of the total food intake, and fat should be 20 percent to 35 percent.


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What Is a Good Carb - to - Protein Ratio


She has written for The Associated Press and "Jezebel," "Charleston," "Chatter" and "Reach" magazines. Weight loss or weight maintenance can be a numbers game: You must eat the right amount of fats, proteins and carbohydrates for good health. Still, some general guidelines can apply concerning the roles carbohydrates and proteins should play in your daily diet. Carbohydrates are foods that are broken down into sugar, starch and fiber in the body. They are the body’s key energy source; your cells use sugars and starches in the form of glucose, which is associated with powering your cells. Amino acids are the building blocks of many processes in your body and compose your body’s tissues, including skin, hair and muscles. The first group consumed a ratio of 3.5 grams of carbohydrates to every 1 gram of protein. The second group consumed a ratio of 1.4 grams of carbohydrates to every 1 gram of protein. While this research shows promise in increasing the recommendations for protein compared to carbohydrates, the researchers noted that the effects of long-term high-protein intake are unknown.


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The Golden Ratio - Carbs, Protein, and Fat


The Golden Ratio - Carbs, Protein, and Fat. The recommendation is to have a good ratio of calories, 40-50% Carbs, 25-35% protein, 20-30% fat. This information can be found once you enter information into your Food Log and using the Analysis tool from the top menu. It is recommended to never go below 1200 calories if you are a female, because your body will go into starvation mode and it is possible that you might gain weight, besides doing serious damage to your body. Your body needs 1200 calories per day to survive (credit to Saroful). -The heart needs 12% of the calories (144 cals) -The kidney needs 12% of the calories (144 cals) -The Liver needs 23% of the calories (276 cals) -The brain needs 23% of the calories (276 cals) -The skeletal muscle needs 30% of the calories (360 cals) By just simply sitting, walking to your car, driving, talking with others, and all the other tiny little processes you do each day, it's estimated around 2000 calories for the "average person" to consume. In other words, if I go out and lift weights for an hour (about 350 calories.which I think is a little low, but whatever) and just live my life for a day, I actually burn around 2500 calories. One of the easiest, most succesfful and healthy ways I lost weight was:   to eat healthy food, i.e lean meats, leafy greens and veggies and whole grains. And finally and this sounds like it will help you alot is, I didnt eat anything after 6pm.


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Macronutrients : the Importance of Carbohydrate, Protein


Macronutrients: the Importance of Carbohydrate, Protein, and Fat. Nutrients are substances needed for growth, metabolism, and for other body functions. This means that if you looked at the Nutrition Facts label of a product and it said 12 grams of carbohydrate, 0 grams of fat, and 0 grams of protein per serving, you would know that this food has about 48 calories per serving (12 grams carbohydrate multiplied by 4 calories for each gram of carbohydrate = 48 calories). Besides carbohydrate, protein, and fat the only other substance that provides calories is alcohol. Carbohydrates are the macronutrient that we need in the largest amounts. Carbohydrates are easily used by the body for energy. All of the tissues and cells in our body can use glucose for energy. Carbohydrates can be stored in the muscles and liver and later used for energy. We need protein for: Although macronutrients are very important they are not the only things that we need for survival. Micronutrients are nutrients that our bodies need in smaller amounts, and include vitamins and minerals. (See the Vitamins and Minerals handout for more information).


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Protein, Carb, Fat ratio


Protein, Carb, Fat ratio? I was wondering what percentage of my calories should come from protein, carbs, and fats? I've read that 60% carbs, 30% protein, and 10% fat is a good ratio but it just looks like it is really high in carbs? If you're insulin resistant, I've heard that the 30% carbohydrate, 40% protein, and 30% fat ratio works. I've read that 40% carbohydrate, 40% protein, and 20% fat is good for fat loss as well. I've also heard the 60% carbohydrate, 30% protein, and 10% fat is good for muscle gain and fat loss as well. Aim for 1g of protein per pound you weigh, get 20% or more of calories from fat, and play with the carb/fat ratio as you see fit. If it doesn't work, change it a bit, but get at least 1g of protein per pound and at least 20% of calories from fat. So you have to play with it and get a feel for what works. The same is true for carbs and protein. I think the 20% of calories from fat is more for the average caloric range, to ensure that someone is getting enough fat intake. Though, just for me, I'd get more fat than 10% regardless of calories.


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Carb Calculator - Health Blog


Then use the carb calculator below to calculate the carb protein fat ratio in calories and grams. You can use a preset ratio or enter your own ratios in the appropriate spaces. The preset carb protein fat ratios are as follows: Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are broken down in the intestine. Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are macronutrients that make up the bulk of the diet.


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What is a Healthy Carb Protein Fat Ratio


What is a Healthy Carb Protein Fat Ratio? People disagree on what the proper ratio is, but most agree it is 40-45% carbohydrates or carbs, 25-30% protein and 30-35% fat each day. With that in mind, you should eat carbs that are high in fiber to slow the rush of sugar to the blood stream. If eaten in excess, simple carbs will be stored as fat in the body. Carbs supply much needed energy to the heart, brain and kidneys which is why they play a prominent role in the healthy carb protein fat ratio. Our bodies will attempt to remove the carbs from our muscles, causing muscle loss. Three to four of these portions will provide 60-80 grams (2.1 to 2.8 ounces) of the protein needed each day. Fats break down into the good, the bad and the ugly. The really horrible fats are trans-fats which should be avoided entirely. Saturated fats are not as heart healthy as mono-unsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, but they are important and as much as 10% of your fat intake can come from saturated fats. Whenever we examine what we should be eating we should be looking for a healthy carb protein fat ratio.


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FREE BODYBUILDING MACRONUTRIENT CALCULATOR


This free bodybuilding macronutrient calculator will show you exactly how many daily calories you require along with the exact grams of protein, carbs and fats you should consume to meet your individual muscle building or fat burning needs. First, the calculator will estimate your daily calorie maintenance level, which is the number of calories you require to maintain your current weight. Second, it will add or subtract the appropriate number of calories from your maintenance level to create either a calorie surplus for muscle growth or a calorie deficit for fat loss. Third, the calculator will translate your calorie intake into an optimal amount of daily protein, carbohydrates and fats to help you meet your goal as effectively as possible. After you’ve received your daily nutrition breakdown, make sure to continue reading further for more important information about how to structure your diet in the most effective way possible, as well as how to adjust your calorie intake over time. Cutting: I want to lean down and lose body fat while maintaining lean muscle and strength. Just hit the submit button below for your macronutrient breakdown… #1 – If your goal is to gain muscle, aim for a total body weight gain of 0.5-1 pounds per week. #2 – If your goal is to lose fat, aim for a total body weight loss of between 1-2 pounds per week. (Note that it’s normal to lose a larger amount in the first 2-3 weeks as your body’s overall water weight decreases and your total food volume drops) So, employ the calorie/macronutrient guidelines given above and then adjust accordingly if you’re gaining or losing body weight at too slow or too quick a rate based on your goal. Also keep in mind that as you gain more muscle or lose more fat, your calories need to be continually adjusted in order to produce further results. Once your body weight stalls, add or subtract 100-150 calories from your current intake (add if you’re trying to gain muscle and subtract if you’re trying to lose fat) and then re-calculate your macros using the calculator or just doing so manually. This is the breakdown that the macronutrient structure is based on… S training, nutrition and supplementation advice to help you build muscle and lose fat in the most productive yet practical way possible.


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What’s the Best Protein - to - Carb Ratio for Weight Loss?Peak


At the end of the 12 weeks, researchers found that all participants lost a significant amount of weight, with the normal protein group losing a bit more than the low-protein and high-protein groups. However, those in the normal protein group lost more total body fat as a percentage of total weight than the women in the low- and high-protein groups. When it came to waist circumference, those women in the normal protein group lost 11.6 centimeters, as compared to just 7.9 in the low-protein group and 8.6 in the high-protein group. For hip circumference, the normal protein group lost 8.8 centimeters, with just 7.4 lost in the low-protein group. On the blood pressure front, those in the high-protein group saw a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (10.6 mm Hg), as compared to the low-protein group (8.7 mm Hg) and the normal protein group (8.1 mm Hg). Numbers were closer when it came to diastolic blood pressure, with decreases measuring in at 5.4 mm Hg, 5.7 mm Hg, and 5 mm Hg for the low-, normal, and high-protein groups, respectively. Resting heart rate decreased across all groups, with the normal protein group seeing the largest reduction at 13 beats per minute (bpm). The low group had a mere 5.6 bpm reduction and the high group enjoyed an 8.8 bpm decrease. While there were no significant differences in fasting glucose levels, insulin levels decreased significantly in the high-protein (71 pmol/l) and normal protein groups (66 pmol/l). All groups saw reductions in triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol levels, though the differences between groups were not significant. The normal group had less than half that reduction at 1.74, while the high-protein group had a miniscule 0.34 decrease.


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The Best Macronutrient Ratio for Bodybuilding


The Best Macronutrient Ratio for Bodybuilding. Determine your optimal macronutrient ratio for better gains. When dieting for a bodybuilding contest or following a muscle-building meal plan, the macronutrient ratio you consume is of critical importance. When you eat carbs, they are broken down into glucose, which can be stored in the liver and muscle cells, or used immediately for fuel. Mike Roussell recommends starting with a macronutrient ratio of 30 percent protein, 30 percent fat and 40 percent carbohydrates, as this should allow for maximum muscle gain while keeping you lean. According to Lyle Mc Donald, author of "The Protein Book," your macronutrient ratio doesn't matter if your calorie intake isn't on point. To build muscle, you need to consume more calories than you burn, and vice versa for fat loss. The standard macronutrient ratio can change, depending on your goals. Determine your caloric needs, and start with the ratio of 30-30-40. When losing fat, keep an eye on the scales and your waistline, and don't be afraid to alter the macronutrient ratio if you need to.


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Diet Talk : Protein, fat, carb ratio


Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 09:11. I am very confused on the ratio of protein, fat, and carb intake. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 09:23. PATIENCE is a virtue, and will keep you motivated.remember this is not a diet but learning a new way of eating for the rest of our lives. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 09:54. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 18:28. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 18:43. Posted: 25 Mar 2010, 18:56. Posted: 26 Mar 2010, 14:52. Posted: 26 Mar 2010, 15:15. Posted: 26 Mar 2010, 15:37.


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3 Keys To Dialing In Your Macronutrient Ratios


Low fat intake can also impair absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A , D , E , and K . This will help determine how well you tolerate carbs and establish where in the above ranges you should start. Start with the body type you most resemble, and tweak as necessary. Diet Recommendations: Ectomorphs should stick to the high end of the range for carbohydrates, between 30-60 percent of total calories, depending on whether the goal is mass gains, maintenance, or fat loss. I recommend the high end for mass gains, the mid-upper end for maintenance (45-55 percent), and the low-end for fat loss. At least 25 percent of total calories should come from protein, with the remainder from fat. Again, I recommend the high-end for mass gains (40-50 percent), the middle for maintenance (30-40), and low-end for fat loss (20-30). Because excess carbohydrates in the endomorph's diet end up as fat, a high carbohydrate intake will make it difficult for them to get lean or lose weight. Here, I recommend no more than 30-40 percent carbohydrates for mass gains, the middle range for maintenance (20-30), and low-end for fat loss (10-20). As with the other body types, protein and fat provide the remainder of your calories, with 25-50 percent of total calories from protein and 15-40 percent from fat. In general, women are more efficient at burning fat and less efficient at burning the glycogen stored in muscle. Then, start on the low end for carbohydrates and see how you do.


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The Ideal Ratio Of Carbs and Fat For Muscle Gain


The Ideal Ratio Of Carbs And Fat For Muscle Gain. From the low-fat, high carb bodybuilding diets of the 1980s, through to the ultra-low carb and high fat Anabolic diet, bodybuilding experts have argued what the optimal ratio of carbs to fat is for muscle gain. If you’re serious about your training and progress in the gym, you need to get serious about your nutrition too. Read More: The Ideal Ratio Of Carbs And Fat For Fat Loss. What you need is a diet that helps you pack on the right type of weight – slabs of lean muscle, with minimal fat gain. This brings us to the first issue of calories, that we must address before tackling carbs and fat. The next consideration is the all-important carb and fat intake. You need fat for hormone production. The main muscle-building hormone is testosterone, and to produce testosterone, you need an ample fat intake. Just like protein, any lower than this could mean you’re not making the most of fat’s hormone boosting properties, and not producing enough testosterone to successfully gain muscle, while any more is just overkill. Get your fat from a mixture of sources, and try to include all three types of fat; Add up the calories you’re consuming from protein and fat (protein has 4 calories per gram and fat has 9 calories per gram) and subtract these from your total calorie intake.


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Protein for Athletes - Perfect Health Diet


Protein for Athletes. So when a person is in nitrogen balance, the amount of dietary protein matches the amount of metabolized protein, and the protein content of the body is unchanged. Some people are in nitrogen balance at protein intake of 0.9 g/kg/day; others need as much as 1.5 g/kg/day. The average person needs much less protein to be in nitrogen balance. The US RDA for protein, 0.8 g/kg/day, was set so that 97.5% of Americans would be in nitrogen balance. [2] But just to be conservative, and because we’re developing advice for athletes, let’s consider 1.5 g/kg/day as the protein intake that brings our athletes into nitrogen balance. What about the protein intake that exhausts benefits? Ned, citing a review paper [2], offers the following answer: “[P]rotein intake beyond 25 percent of what is necessary to achieve a nitrogen balance of zero would have no effect on muscle gain.” At a protein intake of 230 g/day (920 calories), the body’s ability to convert ammonia to urea is saturated. [3] This means the nitrogen from every additional gram of protein lingers in the body as ammonia, a toxin. So the “plateau region” where all the benefits, and none of the toxicity, are achieved is between 150 g/day and some protein intake not much above 150 g/day. What this tells us is that athletes should consume about 150 g/day protein.


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What is best ratio of protein/carbs/fat to gain muscle


Nutrition discussion on what is best ratio of protein/carbs/fat to gain muscle?, within the Bodybuilding Forum; i took ross's advice and looked through the bulking thread and have now worked out to gain 1 pound of . I took ross's advice and looked through the bulking thread and have now worked out to gain 1 pound of body weight a week i need to be eating 3000 calories a day for my stats. My question is what is the best ratio of splitting this up to maximise muscle gain? If it's high and you're eating clean, then you will fall in that range, I think. For me, my primary concern is protein. I aim for 275-325gr of protein a day, which is 1100-1300 calories from protein. I add or subtract carbs to hit my total calorie number for the day since my fat & protein intake stays pretty much the same. Im also going to see if i can work my diet to include "real" food to get my protein intake rather than keep using the shakes to make it up but this will have to go on how my stomach reacts to this. I have not measured out my ratios for awhile.but i always make sure i get at least 230 g protein a day.on the weekends.i sleep in and don't stay up for as long.so i use alot of healthy fats to get my calories in.so far today i've had about 165 g of protein and 165g of fat. I do have alot more carbs during the week just because of what i eat at work. And when you seek forgiveness. And for all eternity.


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Carb, Protein, Fat Calorie Calculator


Some argue that manipulating macronutrient levels is a successful technique for both losing fat and gaining muscle. Flexible Dieting is a newer dietary technique that is proving popular - and has very few restrictions on what can be eaten (see a useful macro calculator for flexible dieters ). 130+ pages including the basics, tips, recipes, meal plans, exercise guides and much more. Gary Taubes' book Good Calories, Bad Calories delves into how our bodies are for more complex than first thought, and processing of fat is not simply about energy intake. His paper " The science of obesity " argues that the energy balance (calories in, calories out) is just a hypothesis. Other research argues that it's only reduced calories that works, regardless of which macronutrients are emphasized. The reality is - you must find what works for you - and to do this you have to start somewhere! The fat in a Big Mac and Fries can contain enough fat for an entire days intake! The bottom line is to make sure your nutrient ratios are promoting the desired weight loss and having a positive effect on your overall health. The science of obesity: what do we really know about what makes us fat? Comparison of weight-loss diets with different compositions of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. The Macro-Nutrient and Daily Calorie Needs calculators I use all the time.


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How to Calculate Protein, Fat and Carb Food Ratios


The daily ratio of proteins, fats, carbs are calculated in grams, not calories, as follows: To calculate fats, take 68, which is your “due body weight,” and multiply it times 2.5 to find out the minimum amount of fat grams to consume daily, i.e. For the maximum amount of fats to consume, take 68 x 3.5 = 238 grams of fat maximum. Note: Ratios are based up on the number of calories needed daily, which are translated into protein, fat and carb gram ratios. Age 3 months to 3 years: 90-100 calories per kilogram per day. Age 3 years to 8 years: 80-90 calories per kilogram per day. Age 8 years to 12 years: 60-80 calories per kilogram per day. Age 12 years to 16 years: 45-60 calories per kilogram per day. Protein: Total calories needed per day times 13%, for example 1,500 x 13% = 195 calories. Fat: Total calories needed per day times 76%, for example 1,500 x 76% = 1,140 calories. Carbs: Total calories needed per day times 11%, for example 1,500 x 11% = 165 calories. Protein calories divided by 4 calories, for example 195 calories (above) divided by 4 = 49 protein grams. Fat calories divided by 9 calories, for example 1,140 calories (above) divided by 9 = 127 fat grams. Carb calories divided by 4 calories, for example 165 calories (above) divided by 4 = 41 carb grams. After you write down protein, fat and carbs grams (above) that are needed per day, use a nutritional calculator to determine the amount of foods you need to consume in order to meet your ratios.


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See how many carbs, proteins, and fats you need to look


I eat 500-900 cal / day but Never lost any significant weight 1 Kg that comes and goes . I am eating around 1200 calories now (I used to have 50 at most and abuse substances to try help) but I seem to just be putting weight on. I have been now focusing on protein levels and started taking shakes. I was just wondering if yo have any extra tips to help lose fat but regain muscle and look nice. I have been trying to loose weight now for 3 years and nothing has helped I am 31 and 209 lbs. Hello need some help please I'm 36 years old and 6'0 tall weight 320 I want to build muscle mass but trying to stay the same weight. What do u think on how much carbs and protein do I need for a day! I Want to build muscle mass and loose fat at the same time. I am trying to build muscle using P 90 X 3 and have incorporated running in lieu of the cardio with the program. I am also trying to lean out, not lose weight per se, but look more cut and hike up the booty! Hey I'm trying to burn fat and build muscle at the same time my main focus for muscle building Is my booty. I am 5'1 207 lbs, yes I know I am overweight and I have been working at for the last couple of years off and on. Can you give me the correct information as to how many calories, carbs, proteins, and fats I should intake to help me lose weight. Do you have a weight gain, muscle gain eating plan?


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