Can I Get Weight Loss Surgery On The Nhs


Weight Loss Surgery


People also need to be healthy enough to get the surgery. Unlike gastric bypass, a gastric sleeve operation only changes the stomach. Like the other kinds of surgery, gastric banding makes the stomach smaller. Gastric bypass surgery can help people lose the most weight right away. People might not get the nutrition they need after bypass surgery. The gastric sleeve surgery is a simpler operation: Unlike gastric bypass surgery, gastric sleeve surgery only affects the stomach. Gastric banding is the only surgery that's not permanent: Gastric banding is the simplest of the three weight loss surgeries. Food can move too fast through the stomach and intestines after weight loss surgery (especially gastric bypass). People who have had weight loss surgery might not get all the nutrition they need. People also can have emotional side effects after weight loss surgery: But for people who face serious weight-related medical problems and who are willing to put the effort into a new way of life, weight loss surgery can be worth it.


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Gastric bypass surgery : Who is it for? - Mayo Clinic


Gastric bypass surgery: Who is it for? Gastric bypass surgery is the most common type of weight-loss surgery. In addition, the long-term success of gastric bypass surgery depends on your ability to make permanent changes in your lifestyle. When you want to be considered for gastric bypass surgery, you must undergo a thorough evaluation to determine if it's suitable for your situation. Guidelines to qualify for gastric bypass surgery. You may need to meet certain medical guidelines to qualify for weight-loss surgery. In general, gastric bypass and other weight-loss surgery could be an option for you if: In some cases, you may qualify for certain types of weight-loss surgery if your BMI is 30 to 34 and you have serious weight-related health problems. Evaluating if you're ready for gastric bypass surgery. A team of health professionals — usually including a doctor, dietitian, psychologist and surgeon — evaluate whether gastric bypass or one of the other forms of weight-loss surgery is appropriate for you. When conducting an evaluation for gastric bypass surgery, the health team considers: The results of these tests and exams may help determine eligibility for weight-loss surgery. Certain mental health conditions may contribute to obesity or make it more difficult for you to maintain the health benefits of gastric bypass surgery. While these may not prevent you from having gastric bypass surgery, your doctors may want to postpone surgery to ensure that any condition is appropriately treated and managed. Although there's no specific age limit for gastric bypass surgery, the risks increase as you get older.


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Weight - loss operations : Your stories - BBC News


I had a gastric band fitted on the NHS in March 2008, and have lost 12-and-a-half-stone in 16 months. I felt it was my last chance - if the surgery did not work for me, that was it. I was one of those lucky few in 2005 to receive gastric bypass surgery on the NHS. I was 28-and-a-half stone, aged 32, and I am now 14 stone. I had to go through hell and high water for more than 12 months to qualify for surgery funded through the NHS. I went up to 20st 8lb when I had the surgery, now I'm back to 16 stone. The surgery was straight forward. I went in on the Monday morning and was home by Wednesday. My wife and I both had gastric surgery. I had gastric bypass surgery in 2007 when I was 23. I was 21 stone at my heaviest, and a size 28. I had my operation at the beginning of May 2009 and it took 12 months to drop the 10 stone. I have been told I am the odd one out as I was happy being bigger and I didn't have any illnesses associated with obesity. People can say that surgery is the only option as they have a low metabolism and whatever they do never works. I weighed 18 stone and always used the excuse that it was my metabolism and just the way my body worked.


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NHS weight - loss surgery urged for 800,000 diabetics — RT UK


The NHS currently offers bariatric surgery to morbidly obese people with a BMI of over 40, or over 35 if the person has another serious condition such as diabetes. The NICE draft guidance recommends extending this to people with a BMI of between 30 and 35 who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the last ten years. “Updated evidence suggests people who are obese and have been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may benefit from weight loss surgery,” said Mark Baker, director of the Centre for Clinical Practice at NICE.


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Applying for NHS funding › WLS Info


The process of applying for NHS funding for your weight loss surgery. You can do this by researching the forums and looking under the surgery specific forums. It would be helpful for you to read these prior to seeing your GP so that you know whether you fulfill the criteria. You may have a GP who is well versed in applying to the PCT for funding for this kind of surgery. On the whole it is necessary for your GP to make the case for you requiring NHS funding for this surgery. You can do this by ringing your GP's secretary after a week and ask if the request has been written and sent out. You may wish to ring the contact person at the PCT the day after the Panel has convened and ask for the outcome. It is unlikely you will be given this by phone but ask when the letter will be sent out to you and your GP. If you have been successful in securing funding your GP will refer you to the local bariatric team for assessment. It is critical that from the beginning of this whole process you keep a detailed file on your request for weight loss surgery and that you keep copies of all correspondence, including emails in this. At this point you may wish to involve PALS, your local MP, the Minister for Health and the Chief Executive of the PCT.


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Offer weight loss surgery to obese people with diabetes


Offer weight loss surgery to obese people with diabetes. The NHS should offer weight loss surgery to thousands more people in order to tackle an epidemic of type 2 diabetes, says NICE. One in 20 people in the UK has type 2 diabetes. NICE recommends that all patients with a BMI of 35 or over who have recent-onset type 2 diabetes should be assessed for surgery. Weight loss surgery is also beneficial for people with a BMI of 30-34.9 who have recent-onset type 2 diabetes that is very poorly controlled. NICE recommends that doctors consider surgery for people of Asian family origin who have recent-onset type 2 diabetes at a lower BMI than other populations, as the point at which the level of body fat becomes a health risk varies between ethnic groups. Dr Rachel Batterham, Head of Obesity and Bariatric Services at University College London Hospital Trust - who was involved in developing the guidance, said: “We know that surgery can make a real difference for people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes, so the guideline now recommends that if someone is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and their BMI is 35 or over then they should be offered an early, rapid assessment for weight loss surgery. “If we look at the latest report of bariatric surgery done in the UK, there were 4,000 patients with type 2 diabetes who had surgery. “The health benefits of weight loss surgery are so great that it should be considered as part of the treatment for obese diabetics. The initial cost of weight loss surgery is around £6,000 in the short term, but preventing the long-term complications of diabetes is great for the individual and will save the NHS money. NICE recommends a follow-up care package for people who have had surgery for a minimum of 2 years within the bariatric service. We know that surgery can make a real difference for people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes.


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Bariatric surgery - North Tees and Hartlepool


You will meet other people who are thinking about having weight loss surgery and members of our team. We will tell you what you can expect when you go throughout your care with us and more information about the procedures we offer. Your next appointment will be a longer appointment where you will be assessed by various members of our team including the consultant, nurse specialist and dietitian . Everyone is different and every member of our team will want to ensure we come up with the most appropriate care to suit you as an individual. At your next appointment you will meet the consultant and specialist nurse again. If you have met the weight loss target the team is happy, we will offer to list you for surgery. You can contact our specialist nurse for help and advice.


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Weight loss surgery - NHS Choices


Weight loss surgery  Read more about who can have weight loss surgery . Availability of weight loss surgery. Weight loss surgery is also available privately. Types of weight loss surgery. The three most widely used types of weight loss surgery are: Read more about  how weight loss surgery is performed . Life after weight loss surgery. Read more about  life after weight loss surgery . As with all types of surgery, weight loss surgery carries the risk of complications, some of which are serious and potentially fatal, such as: Read more about the  risks of weight loss surgery . Read more about the results of weight loss surgery .


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I binge but am having another NHS operation


Obese Laura Ripley caused outrage in 2009, when she revealed she was still eating junk food despite having an £8,000 gastric sleeve on the NHS. 'I had to lose weight for the sleeve- which I did- but I don't have the wilpower to do it again' But, in August 2009, Laura told Closer she couldn’t afford to eat healthily on her £600-a-month of benefits and now admits she’s regained some of the weight she lost through surgery. Despite continuing to eat chocolate and crisps every day, a 25st 8lbs Laura is booked in for a gastric bypass in June, which will cost the taxpayer up to £15,000. Laura is also hoping for arm and thigh lifts and a tummy tuck, on the NHS, worth a total of £12,000. She says: “Some people might say I don’t deserve the second operation, but I do. Laura, 28, from Hastings, who has never worked and lives off benefits, is one of the people costing the NHS more than £32million a year by having weight-loss surgery. He says: “Laura would have been told what to eat after her gastric sleeve, but she’s ignored advice and gone back to her old ways. The NHS came to her aid when it was necessary, but now she’s scrounging off the system and could be denying someone with a life-threatening illness, like cancer, surgery.” Laura, who’s always struggled with her weight, says: “I had to lose weight for the sleeve – which I did – but I don’t have the willpower to do it again. Aged 12, Laura weighed 15st and spent her pocket money on comfort food because she was bullied. Over the next three years, 5ft 6 Laura put on an incredible 10st and, by the time she was 20, she was morbidly obese at 38st. She says: “For six weeks, I was on fluids and ate small portions. She was added to the waiting list for a gastric bypass – where the stomach capacity is halved. Laura says: “I’m excited about the gastric bypass.


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NHS Weight Loss Scheme - Weight Loss Resources


NHS Weight Loss Scheme. Get paid to lose weight with a new NHS hospital weight loss scheme. Patients enrolled on the scheme could earn anything up to £1800 for shedding the pounds, but with the increase of hospital fast food outlets this weight loss scheme is already under fire. A new NHS weight loss scheme does just that - patients get paid up to £1800 to lose weight. Run by the external firm Weight Wins, these NHS weight loss schemes offer a variety of financial incentives for losing the weight. The Primary Care Trust pays £185 for every person who enrols in the scheme, and all pay outs are covered by Weight Wins. Patients must also show that they can maintain their new weight and not put the pounds back on! This radical scheme is a bid to save the NHS money on weight related surgery and obesity-related diseases in the long-run, which is currently costing the NHS billions. Will the NHS Weight Loss Scheme Work? The Journal of the American Medical Association carried out a 16-week trial to see whether those who were motivated by a financial incentive were more likely to lose the weight. Like all weight loss approaches, there will be a subset for whom this works well, but not for all or even the majority. But whilst photos appear of a woman on a drip ordering at a fast food counter in Cambridge’s Addenbrookes Hospital, the National Obesity Forum suggest that the message seems to be that the NHS is “effectively endorsing” fast food, not weight loss.


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Im fat really fat and have thought about weight loss


Im fat really fat and have thought about weight loss surgery can you get the gastric balloon from the nhs? Best Answer:  they will only do this for you if you have really tried to lose weight and exercise regularly, unless your really overweight and can't exercise or move, they will then do this but you would really need to cut out the unhealthy food. In some cases they will give you gastric band and balloon on NHS. Seriously, it may force you to lose weight, but is the pain really worth it? Then at least you can occasionally treat yourself to a fish and chips without feeling sick. Get help from your GP (you can get appetite suppressants/ "diet pills"from them on the NHS, I believe) You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3 GP, 3 GPP, MP 4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600 MB. You can only upload a photo (png, jpg, jpeg) or a video (3gp, 3gpp, mp4, mov, avi, mpg, mpeg, rm). You can only upload a photo or a video.


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New Weight - Loss Surgery to Lose 20 - 50 Pounds - ABC News


Tom Lavin, founder of Surgical Specialists in Louisiana, is a pioneer behind the hottest new weight-loss procedure called POSE, which stands for primary obesity surgery endoluminol. "POSE is for patients who want to lose 25-50, maybe 60 or 70 pounds," says Lavin. "People get liposuction all the time, and they might lose 4 pounds of fat," says Lavin. Food and Drug Administration, its use in weight- loss surgery has not been approved, and no long-term studies have been done in the U. "Until we have good data, it's not something that we should be promoting to the public," says Garber. Neither is POSE and approved procedure by the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. "The data is not sufficient to support its approval at this time," says Dr. Lavin says s that his innovative surgery is similar to the bariatric procedures that preceded it, and that there will always be growing pains. "It is not going to displace bariatric surgery for the morbidly obese, because it doesn't compete … And while it might not be a magic bullet for weight loss, patients like Townsend and Talley seem happy with the results so far.


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NHS turning to weight - loss surgery to tackle obesity


The NHS is increasingly resorting to surgery to tackle Britain’s obesity problem, with the number of gastric bypass operations rising six-fold in just five years. Ministers want to tackle the problem at source, but surgeons say weight loss surgery is extremely effective for the morbidly obese. Between 2006-7 and 2011-12 the number of gastric bypass operations increased from 858 to 5,407, according to figures from the NHS Health and Social Care Information Centre. A gastric bypass involves making the stomach much smaller and shortening the length of the small intestine. It has become much more popular than gastric banding, which involves inserting an adjustable and removable band that limits the effective size of the stomach, but nothing else. Surgeons said the increases indicated there was a large unmet need for weight loss (‘bariatric’) surgery, rather than any sizeable increase in the number of morbidly obese people since 2006. Alberic Fiennes, president of the the British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society (BOMSS), said: "There are about 1.5 million such adults in the UK. “There is compelling evidence that weight-loss surgery to treat the most severely affected is one of the most clinically effective, safe and cost effective treatments available. The NHS currently spends about £50 million on bariatric surgery. "It's important that families get the help and support they need early on before their obesity reaches the severe stage and they're left with no option but to have a gastric bypass operation."


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How to get your health insurer to pay for your weight


How to get your health insurer to pay for your weight-loss surgery. Even with your doctor’s recommendation and coverage available from your health insurance policy, your health insurer might not pay for the surgery. If you’re considering bariatric surgery and want your health insurance to pay for it, you may have to jump through a few hoops. It's common to find health insurance companies that will not pay for weight-loss surgery, yet these same insurers are paying for years of treating the conditions associated with obesity. Your best chance for attaining insurance coverage for weight-loss surgery is through a group health plan.  The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery certifies "Centers of Excellence" around the country. For Aetna plans that do cover bariatric surgery, here is a summary of the criteria for gastric bypass approval: Bariatric surgery is specifically excluded under the standard CIGNA Health Care plan, but employers can elect to include or exclude coverage for bariatric surgery in their group health plans. CIGNA Health Care also covers medically necessary reversal for bariatric surgery when a patient has complications and, under certain circumstances, covers revision of a previous bariatric procedure when the patient has not lost adequate weight. At best, you'll need mounds of documentation to show the surgery is medically necessary for you. Hutcher compares submitting a claim for bariatric surgery to playing roulette: "And in roulette, you know the house always wins," he says. So why do health insurers seem to fail to see the cost-effectiveness in paying for surgery versus paying for years and years of treating related conditions? You will probably need to provide further documentation of your need for the surgery as medically necessary.


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Is weight loss surgery right for me?' - Live Well


'Is weight loss surgery right for me?' If you’re very obese and you’ve already tried improving your diet and exercise levels without success, then weight loss surgery could be the right option for you. What is weight loss surgery? Who can have weight loss surgery? Your GP can assess you to see if weight loss surgery is right for you. To be considered for weight loss surgery on the NHS, you should have a body mass index (BMI) of: If your GP thinks that weight loss surgery is right for you, you’ll be referred to a specialist weight loss team. A consultant will assess you to decide if weight loss surgery is the right step to take. They should also discuss the weight loss that can result, and the changes to your lifestyle that you will need to make afterwards. If you and the specialist team decide to go ahead with surgery, you should be offered ongoing psychological support and help with changing your diet and lifestyle before the operation. The type of weight loss surgery you have will depend on your circumstances, including how overweight you are and any other health problems you have. Following weight loss surgery, you will feel full after very small portions of food. Your weight loss will also be monitored at the follow-up appointments. Once you have recovered from surgery, exercising regularly will help you to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. You can find more information and advice in recommendations after weight loss surgery.


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Bariatric surgery - Mayo Clinic


American Gastroenterological Association. American Gastroenterological Association medical position statement on obesity. Bariatric surgery for severe obesity. Surgical management of severe obesity. Complications of bariatric surgery. Medical management of patients after bariatric surgery. American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, the Obesity Society, and American Society for Metabolic & Bariatric Surgery medical guidelines for clinical practice for the perioperative nutritional, metabolic, and nonsurgical support of the bariatric surgery patient. Obesity. Collazo-Clavell ML (expert opinion). Rochester, Minn. Sarr MG (expert opinion). Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.


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Women Undergoing Bariatric Surgery Should not Get


Women who undergo bariatric surgery (weight-loss surgery) should wait at least one year before trying to get pregnant. The risk of pregnancy complications increases with obesity, however, women who get pregnant after having bariatric surgery have a lesser chance of problems than women who are extremely obese. One study which followed pregnancies after women had bariatric surgery showed that 79.2% of subjects had no issues during their pregnancy. However, the researchers noted, there can be surgical complications during pregnancy for women who have had weight-loss surgery. After careful review on the research available, the researchers suggested that women should wait at least 12 months after having bariatric surgery to get pregnant. Multidisciplinary input care is the key to a healthy pregnancy for women who have undergone bariatric surgery. "Pregnancy after bariatric surgery is safer than pregnancy in morbidly obese women. Women who have had bariatric surgery generally tolerate pregnancy well.


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NHS Weight loss surgery - obesity surgery


Funding for surgery (which includes obesity surgery) is handled jointly by your local PCT (Primary Care Trust) and hospital (NHS Trust). If, for some reason your PCT does not provide funding for this surgery then you can ask to be referred to a hospital which does offer this service, in another area. If your GP finds a surgeon and hospital who can undertake this surgery then you will have to go there for treatment. The British Obesity and Metabolic Surgery Society state on their website that many people do qualify for surgery and that you can ask for a referral. However, at the end of the day, it comes down to funding and if your PCT does not have money allocated for obesity surgery then you will have to look elsewhere. The funding is there for all obesity surgery patients but unfortunately it can’t pay for everyone and you might be the unlucky person who finds that the well has run dry.


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Weight Loss Surgery - NHS - Clinic Compare


Weight Loss Surgery On The NHS. Am I Eligible For Weight Loss Surgery On The NHS? People with a BMI of 40 or more can be eligible for weight loss surgery through the NHS. If somebody has tried everything they can to lose weight through the regular channels, such as diet and exercise, but have failed to lose any weight for six months, they too may be eligible for weight loss surgery. Can I Get Weight Loss Surgery Through The NHS? Remember the demand for weight loss surgery through the NHS is very high and there is often a long waiting list. Watch Mr Chris Sutton, Consultant Specialist Bariatric Surgeon at Tonic Weight Loss Surgery Ltd, explain who could qualify for weight loss surgery on the NHS: "You can get weight loss surgery on the NHS, it would depend on a patient’s Body Mass Index and whether they have a co-morbidity or condition related to being overweight. The MDT normally consists of a doctor specializing in the digestive tract, known as a gastroenterologist, the surgeon who will carry out the weight loss surgery, the anaesthetist, a nurse specializing in weight loss, and a psychologist. The MDT will carry out assessments to ensure candidates are suitable for weight loss surgery. There are three main types of bariatric surgery – a gastric bypass, the fitting of a gastric band, and a sleeve gastrectomy.


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NHS Direct Wales - Encyclopaedia : Weight loss surgery


The two most widely used types of weight loss surgery are: As with all types of surgery, weight loss surgery carries the risk of complications, some of which are serious and potentially fatal, such as: The overall risk of death in hospital after having any kind of weight loss surgery is around 1 in 1,000. Weight loss surgery may not be recommended if you have a serious illness that would not be improved after the operation, such as: Your current pattern of eating and your willingness to change the pattern after surgery. Read about the risks of weight loss surgery . The recovery time for other types of weight loss surgery are: In the first four weeks after surgery, you will only be able to drink liquids and eat small amount of puréed food, such as mashed potato. The recommended diet after other types of weight loss surgery is likely to be similar to the advice above. As long as you stick to the recommendations on diet and exercise, all types of weight loss surgery can achieve good and often impressive results. The rapid weight loss associated with weight loss surgery can cause a number of side effects and has a number of risks. The risk of death in hospital after having any kind of weight loss surgery is around 1 in 1,000.


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Is Weight Loss Surgery for You


You may be a candidate for weight loss surgery if: You're ready to adjust how you eat after the surgery. When you get weight loss surgery , your surgeon makes changes to your stomach or small intestine, or both. The food you eat bypasses the rest of the stomach, going straight from the pouch to your small intestine. The band limits how much food can go into your stomach. Gastric Sleeve : This surgery removes most of the stomach and leaves only a narrow section of the upper part of the stomach, called a gastric sleeve . The surgery may also curb the hunger hormone ghrelin, so you eat less. Duodenal Switch: This is complicated surgery that removes most of the stomach and uses a gastric sleeve to bypass most of your small intestine.


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Weight Loss Surgery Foundation of America


If you have already been referred: Access the application forms and information HERE. If you are a qualified surgeons office: Please Send an email to request a password and link to the referral form. Referring offices will be required to print a copy of the referral form to give to your patient. You will be asked to provide the following required information with their grant application: · A letter of referral from your surgeons office via the WLSFA Online Referral Form. · Agree to raise 10% of the funds required for your grant. · Willing to be an Ambassador for the WLSFA – Appear on Television, Radio, Print and On -Line. All required information must be submitted with the application including an essay. The Blinded grant application (the applicants name and contact information is removed) along with the surgeons referral is reviewed by the selection committee who selects the finalists.


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Weight loss surgery : Up to two million could benefit


Image caption The numbers having weight loss surgery have been rising, although there was a small dip last year. Bariatric surgery, such as fitting gastric bands, can cut the fatal risks from obesity-related problems such as heart disease and Type 2 diabetes. The two most common types of weight loss surgery are: Depending on the complexity of the procedure and the care required after surgery, NHS England says bariatric surgery costs can vary between £3,000 and £11,505. Guidelines recommend that bariatric surgery be offered to the morbidly obese and those who are not quite morbidly obese but already have other problems, such as heart disease and high blood pressure. Lead researcher Dr Sonia Saxena said: "Despite clear guidelines outlining who can undergo such surgery with the NHS, and evidence that these procedures are cost-effective in the long run, less than 1% of those eligible have weight loss surgery each year. The researchers said there were several reasons why the rates of surgery were so low. The researchers said another barrier was that people might be struggling to make the lifestyle improvements required before having surgery. While the numbers having the surgery have increased threefold in five years, there was actually a small dip in patients last year. The risk of any sort of complication after gastric band surgery is around 1 in 10 compared to 1 in 5 for gastric bypass surgery. The risk of death after a gastric band is around 1 in 200 compared to 1 in 100 for a gastric bypass.


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NHS could triple number of weight - loss surgeries to reduce


The NHS should triple the number of weight-loss surgeries it carries out every year to help tackle the “immense problem” of obesity and reduce the £10bn cost of caring for patients with diabetes, the health watchdog has said. All people classified as obese who have serious weight-related illnesses could now be considered for the surgery. The new guidance stipulates that people considered for the surgery should already have been through a medical weight loss programme. “For more severely obese patients they are the only treatments that have a very good chance of people losing good amounts of weight and keeping that weight off long-term. Under previous guidance, bariatric surgery was offered to people with a BMI of 40 or more, or those with a BMI between 35 and 40 if they also had another significant disease that could be improved if they lost weight. The new guidance has a number of special provisions for people with type 2 diabetes. People with a BMI of over 35 who are diagnosed with the illness will now be offered an “early, rapid assessment” for weight loss surgery. Around 60 per cent of people who undergo surgery will have more control over their diabetes immediately and they are less likely to have diabetes related illness. However, some weight loss experts said the new guidance risked “normalising” weight-loss surgery. Weight loss surgery can lead to complications, and people who have had it cannot eat large portions at meal times ever again. Opposition to bariatric surgery has centred around the idea that it is a “quick fix” that allows people to shirk responsibility for their own weight loss. "I have never come across a person who has said, they wish they never had the surgery.


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Bariatric Surgery Frequently Asked Questions


Selection for surgery depends on your weight and height, the presence of other health or psychological problems, your age and readiness to go ahead with surgery. The amount of weight lost after surgery depends on the type of operation, but more importantly on changing your lifestyle and eating habits. If you don’t stick to this then you will not lose enough weight and may even to put it back on again. The primary aim of weight loss surgery is to solve the problems caused by your obesity and not to get you to your ideal weight. If you lose more than 50% of your extra (excess) weight and it doesn’t come back on again this will be classed as a success. In general weight loss is faster after gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy surgery with most of the weight lost within the first 6 months and stabilising after 12-18 months. How bad this is depends on how much weight you lose, your age and skin tone (generally younger patients have a better skin tone). If you lose more than half of your extra (excess) weight and it doesn’t come back on again this is regarded as a success. How bad this is depends on many factors including how much weight you lose, your age and skin tone (generally younger patients have a better skin tone). How will smoking affect my surgery and post-op time? We understand that this can be very difficult and you will need support. You will not be considered for surgery if you continue to smoke and have not been involved in any stop smoking interventions.


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Obesity surgery could be offered to a million more people


Nice suggests lowering the threshold at which people are offered weight loss surgery – which costs the NHS around £6,000 per operation. Draft guidance by the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (Nice) says increasing numbers of people should be considered for gastric bands and stomach stapling, amid spiralling levels of obesity. At present weight loss surgery is given to patients on the NHS to those who are morbidly obese with a body mass index (BMI) score of over 40 or to those with a BMI over 35 if they have another condition, such as type 2 diabetes. Now the rationing body has suggested that anyone with a BMI of 30 – the threshold between overweight and obese – should be considered for the surgery if they have been diagnosed with diabetes in the last decade. Experts said the changes mean the number of people who qualify for “bariatric” surgery – which costs the NHS around £6,000 per operation – would double to 2 million. Clearly there are going to be thousands of people who will look at this and say – I fit that criteria, I want the surgery.” Bariatric surgery should only be considered as a last resort if serious attempts to lose weight have been unsuccessful and if the person is obese.” The Nice guidance suggests that around 60 per cent of morbidly obese diabetics – those with a BMI of 40 and over – could put the condition in remission by having their stomach stapled. Diabetes UK estimates that the new criteria mean between 850,000 and 900,000 extra people could qualify to be considered for surgery. Updated evidence suggests people who are obese and have been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may benefit from weight loss surgery. “More than half of people who undergo surgery have more control over their diabetes following surgery and are less likely to have diabetes related illness; in some cases surgery can even reverse the diagnosis,” he said. Around 2.7 per cent of men and women are classed as obese, while the proportion of overweight men has risen from 13 per cent to 23 per cent in a decade. Around 8 per cent per cent of men and women are obese, while 38 per cent of men are overweight, and 19 per cent of women. Around 20 per cent of women and 17 per cent of men are obese.


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Can I get breast reduction/lift and weight


Can I get breast reduction/lift and weight loss surgery on the NHS? I'm 17 years old, and I have been trying to lose weight for about 8 years. I have tried dieting, exercise regimes, acupuncture, and many prescribed medications (such as pills that stop my body from absorbing a third of fat from food). Show more I'm 17 years old, and I have been trying to lose weight for about 8 years. I was 15 at the time and I have not been able to go back and do my GCSE's because of my insecurities. Would I be able to get weight reduction surgery on the NHS? Baring in mind that I honestly have tried to lose weight, and kept to plans for long amounts of time before giving up. As for my question about breast surgery, I have a 56 inch chest, and as a consequence my back suffers. I'd rather not have you comment me just to tell me I shouldn't rely on the NHS, because I know I should pay for these surgeries myself, but I can't leave the house for social reasons, let alone to get a job and leave the house several times a week. Update: Oh, and also, as this seems to be something that people assume; I don't eat over-sized portions. Show more Oh, and also, as this seems to be something that people assume; I don't eat over-sized portions. I've learnt a lot about weight loss and foods, and I put all that knowledge to use. Also, please do not assume that in the years I have been struggling with my weight that I have been sitting on my * all day waiting for a miracle. I have pushed myself past the pain barrier many times, and there was never a result.


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Weight Loss Surgery Questions


There are several different types of weight loss surgery available but ultimately, they all work to reduce the number of calories available to your body. There are several procedures to choose from and people who are suitable for surgery should discuss the risks and benefits of each with a health professional. Going ahead with weight loss surgery shouldn’t be undertaken lightly and it’s important that you research and discuss all the possible options with a health professional. The British Obesity Surgery Patient Association can put you in touch with other people who have received surgery to treat their obesity and can also help to locate a patient support group in your area. It’s also crucial that you spend time with your surgeon discussing in detail the different procedures and which one will be best for you. It’s also important that you have a clear idea of what you will and won’t be able to eat after surgery, both in the short and long term – and are prepared to follow the recommended diet, which will probably be very restricted and extremely different to the one you are used to. It will still take time to lose your excess weight – you won’t wake up after the surgery instantly slim. Regardless of whether you plan to have surgery on the NHS or as a private patient, start by making an appointment with your GP. Your surgeon will assess you both physically and psychologically to help him decide whether you will be able to receive an anaesthetic, have the surgery and adhere and cope with a new way of eating after the operation. You should receive information on the different procedures your surgeon may think are appropriate, including the amount of weight you can expect to lose and any health risks. How long will I have to wait for surgery on the NHS? Surgical procedures are not designed to give you the body of a supermodel and they are certainly not a miracle cure for weight loss. Because it doesn’t affect physical health, the NHS doesn’t routinely fund plastic surgery to remove excess skin after weight loss, with the result that you may have to have it removed privately if you can’t live with it – and that may cost between £2,000 and £4,000.


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Obese man Les Price can't get weightloss on


Les price (Picture: Channel 5) A man weighing thirty-five stone has been refused weightloss surgery because the NHS does not believe he is unhealthy enough. He hasn’t been able to work for the last nine years due to an accident in his last workplace and receives £300 a month in disability allowance. But this is not enough to afford the £5,000 gastric sleeve operation privately and the NHS says he does not qualify. Les said: ‘I’m heavy enough but not ill enough for surgery. Les, who takes 17 pills a day for his aches and pains, believes if he was given the operation he would be able to get a job and turn his life around. ‘I know the operation isn’t the answer to everything but if I get it my life could turn round and I could get back to work and stop being a massive drain on NHS resources,’ he told Channel 5 show Fat Chance of Work. Asked whether he has earned the right to have the surgery free on the NHS, he said: ‘I worked all my life so why can’t I have a little bit back?’ A gastric bypass is the most common, which costs the NHS between £9,000 and £15,000 per patient.


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Can I get surgery on the NHS to mend my


Can I get surgery on the NHS to mend my body after substantial weight loss (10st) ? I am so depressed that I have to really fight to see a future for myself. I lost weight initially through diet and exercise and was very optimistic about the future. The stress has caused me to lose a lot of weight, quicker. The stress has caused me to lose a lot of weight, quicker than I would have ever intended. I feel very alone and depressed. I am scared that I will never feel normal. I feel like a freak, I can't look at myself. I think the stress of everything may be killing me but I don't want to die. I have so many dreams. I pray every day that there is help out there for me. I have absolutely no self-eteem, I don't even feel like a woman anymore.


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TWO MILLION obese Brits to get free gastric band


TWO MILLION obese Brits to get free gastric band operations on the NHS. As a result of dramatic new rulings to be announced, up to two million people will be offered free weight loss surgery on the NHS. Currently, around one million people qualify for the surgery but that number will double under the new guidelines. They will also recommend that the plus-35 BMI patients with health conditions no longer need to complete the fitness regime in order to get the surgery. This will double the number of people eligible for free ops. If every one of those two million people had surgery, it could cost the taxpayer £12billion. The financial implications are huge – 10% of the NHS budget is used to treat Type 2 diabetes and its complications alone. He added: “NICE favour surgery, rather than diet, within the NHS, but they have missed swathes of evidence. Surgery will infuriate millions of people who believe that obesity is a self-inflicted disease and it is the obese, not the NHS, who should picking up the bill. He said he would like to see the number of free obese operations on the NHS – or bariatric surgery – triple from its current estimate of 10,000 patients a year. Rachel Batterham, head of obesity and bariatric services at University College London Hospital NHS Trust, added: “We now know the health benefits of bariatric surgery for people with Type 2 diabetes is so great that it really needs to be considered as part of their treatment pathway.”


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Types of Weight Loss Surgery


Considering weight loss surgery ? Weight loss surgery is not for everyone. Types of Weight Loss Surgeries. Existing surgeries help with weight loss in different ways. Restrictive surgeries work by shrinking the size of the stomach and slowing down digestion. The smaller the stomach, the less you can eat. The less you eat, the more weight you lose. Implanting an electrical device, the newest of the three techniques, prompts weight loss by interrupting nerve signals between the stomach and the brain . What it is: Gastric banding is a type of restrictive weight loss surgery.


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More obese patients to get NHS weight - loss surgery


NHS told to spend more on operations to tackle the diabetes epidemic – but can it afford the cost? The NHS should offer more weight-loss surgery to obese patients in order to make future savings and tackle the rise of diabetes, new draft guidelines have suggested. The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (Nice) has said the threshold for considering weight loss surgery should be lowered to include people with recently diagnosed type-2 diabetes who have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 and above. Previously, only people considered to be 'morbidly obese', with a BMI of 35 and above, would have been considered for such surgery, the BBC reports. Over 25 per cent of adults in the UK are obese and complications from the condition cost the NHS £5.1 billion every year, more than five per cent of its annual budget. Tam Fry from the National Obesity Forum said there is a "mismatch" between Nice's recommendations and what the NHS can actually afford.


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Overweight? Consider surgery. and the NHS should pay


Hundreds of thousands more overweight people with type 2 diabetes should be offered weight-loss surgery like gastric bands on the NHS, says draft guidance from Nice. Now the National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (Nice) wants more people to be considered for operations that promote weight loss: anyone with a BMI score of 30 to 35 and with type 2 diabetes, if they have been diagnosed within the last 10 years. Around 10 per cent of the NHS budget is currently spent on treating people with type 2 diabetes. It shows that around 71 per cent of people with type 2 diabetes were diagnosed in the last decade, and around half (47 per cent) of those with the condition have got a BMI over 30. The draft guideline also recommends that people who have undergone bariatric surgery on the NHS should have a "follow-up care package" for at least two years after their operation. In the UK around 2.9 million people have diabetes, with around 90 per cent of cases being type 2. Updated evidence suggests people who are obese and have been recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes may benefit from weight loss surgery. "More than half of people who undergo surgery have more control over their diabetes following surgery and are less likely to have diabetes related illness; in some cases surgery can even reverse the diagnosis."


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Preparing for surgery — Chelsea and Westminster Hospital


This is to ensure you receive the best care and that surgery is safe for you. The surgeon will answer any further questions you have, and if everything is in place, will put you on the waiting list for surgery. Surgery has a drastic impact on the way you eat, your weight and your health and can also have an impact on your self-esteem and body image. The assessment is a chance to think about whether surgery is the best option for you and how you will cope with the lifestyle changes. Stop Smoking Service - You will be advised to stop smoking for at least 2 weeks prior to your surgery. You will meet the dietitian during your initial assessment. We may need to see you more than once prior to surgery to ensure you are well prepared for the dietary and lifestyle changes needed. You will be working closely with the dietitians after surgery also, so it is a good opportunity to get to know them prior to surgery. The more weight you lose prior to surgery, the lower your risks related to having surgery. You will be put on the waiting list once you have completed all of your assessments listed above and you have made a final decision on which surgery you are opting for. You need to ensure you prepare for surgery by following the pre-operative liver shrinkage diet. If you have not received this diet from the dietitians, please contact them and arrange to see them again prior to surgery. You may want to make sure you have someone to help out at home for the first couple of weeks after surgery, especially if you have children. Your appointment with the psychologist will help you with this.


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The skinny on Weight - loss surgery


The skinny on Weight-loss surgery. And what are the risks? So that the patient can absorb some food, a small gastric pouch with a volume of around 20ml is made from part of the stomach and connected to the bypass. Both the bypass and sleeve operations are irreversible. Surgery is not the only option. The Endobarrier is a plastic sleeve that creates a barrier between the intestine and ingested food and works in a similar way to a gastric bypass. It’s often used prior to weight-loss surgery to help reduce the patient’s weight and make the operation easier and safer to perform. The type of surgery you have depends on your health and eating habits. You have to follow a baby-food diet For two weeks before any kind of gastric surgery, patients drink only milk, or are put on a restricted diet, in order to shrink their liver and make it easier for the surgeon to reach the stomach. It also flushes food through the stomach, so patients don’t feel full, and can trigger dumping syndrome [see page 37] in gastric bypass patients,’ explains El-Shafie. ‘If you look after yourself, the surgery will look after you.’ ‘The main reason is inappropriate eating, which can stretch the stomach pouch and enable more food to be ingested,’ says Shaw Somers. The risk is lower if patients were active before surgery. Hair growth should increase once the body has recovered from surgery and the patient is eating a nutrient-rich diet.


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Weight loss surgery reduces diabetes risk - BBC News


Weight loss surgery can dramatically reduce the odds of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a major study. The results, published in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, showed an 80% reduction in type 2 diabetes in those having surgery. The UK NHS is considering offering the procedure to tens of thousands of people to prevent diabetes. Obesity and type 2 diabetes are closely tied - the bigger someone is, the greater the risk of the condition. The study followed 2,167 obese adults who had weight loss - known as bariatric - surgery. Around 3% of morbidly obese people develop type 2 each year, however, surgery reduced the figure to around 0.5%, which is the background figure for the whole population. Bariatric surgery, also known as weight loss surgery, is used as a last resort to treat people who are dangerously obese and carrying an excessive amount of body fat. This type of surgery is available on the NHS only to treat people with potentially life-threatening obesity when other treatments have not worked. Around 8,000 people a year currently receive the treatment. The two most common types of weight loss surgery are: The National Institute of Health and Care Excellence is considering a huge expansion of obesity surgery in the NHS in order to cut rates of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes UK says around 460,000 people will meet the criteria for an automatic assessment under the guidance. "And we need to know about the cost effectiveness of weight loss surgery and how that balances against the costs of diabetes, it does raise some complex issues."


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Weight Loss Surgery, Gastric bypass or band


If this is the case, you can be considered for weight loss surgery if your BMI is 30-34.9. What are the benefits of weight loss surgery? What are some of the risks of weight loss surgery? What are the different types of weight loss surgery? The type of surgery that may be best for you can depend on your weight, any health issues that you may have, the experience of your surgeon, etc. During this type of surgery, your body is less able to digest the fat that you eat and absorb calories from fat. You will also discuss the risks and benefits of the surgery in your situation, and changes that you will have to make to your diet and lifestyle afterwards. You may also need to have some investigations to make sure that it is safe for you to have the surgery. After the surgery, in order to lose weight, you will need to change your eating habits. Some people find that the changes that they need to make to their diet and lifestyle after surgery for weight loss are difficult to come to terms with.


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