Best Macro Ratio For Fat Loss And Muscle Gain


The Best Macronutrient Ratio for Bodybuilding


The Best Macronutrient Ratio for Bodybuilding. Determine your optimal macronutrient ratio for better gains. When dieting for a bodybuilding contest or following a muscle-building meal plan, the macronutrient ratio you consume is of critical importance. When you eat carbs, they are broken down into glucose, which can be stored in the liver and muscle cells, or used immediately for fuel. Mike Roussell recommends starting with a macronutrient ratio of 30 percent protein, 30 percent fat and 40 percent carbohydrates, as this should allow for maximum muscle gain while keeping you lean. According to Lyle Mc Donald, author of "The Protein Book," your macronutrient ratio doesn't matter if your calorie intake isn't on point. To build muscle, you need to consume more calories than you burn, and vice versa for fat loss. The standard macronutrient ratio can change, depending on your goals. Determine your caloric needs, and start with the ratio of 30-30-40. When losing fat, keep an eye on the scales and your waistline, and don't be afraid to alter the macronutrient ratio if you need to.


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Building Muscle and Burning Fat Simultaneously - Is It


The age-old question if is it possible to gain muscle and burn fat simultaneously has been debated for many years. The guidelines and plan included here are designed to help you not only keep, but build muscle while simultaneously burn body fat. This will guarantee that your muscles will be getting the correct dose of amino acids for maintaining and building muscle tissue. That is about as high as you will want to go with protein – the rest is up to carbohydrate and fat manipulation. Now you will start to manipulate carbohydrate in such a way as to trick the body into delving into its fat stores for fuel. You will have high, medium and low consumption days. You will eat low carbs for two to four days followed by medium and high days. On the low days your body will burn fat for fuel and save muscle so as long as your protein intake is high enough. This will shuttle in fuel to the muscle, rev back up your metabolism and be burned without storing body fat. Carbohydrate intake will be approximately .5 grams per pound of bodyweight for low days (90 grams for a 180 pounder), 1.5 grams per pound on medium days (270 grams) and 2.25 grams per pound on high days (405 grams). This will ensure your hormone levels will stay steady and will supply you with ample energy for your grueling workouts. On the low carb days simply increase your fat intake by 50%.


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Flexible Dieting IIFYM Macro Calculator - Healthy Eater


This IIFYM macro and TDEE calculator gives you the ability to adjust your TDEE and macros at 4 different goal settings. Lose 10% puts you in a 10% calorie deficit and is intended for those with less than 10 pounds to lose and who also wish to build muscle at the same time. Gain puts you in a 20% calorie surplus and is designed for people who are wanting to build muscle fast in conjunction with a comprehensive weight training program. If however you do a lot of lifting (3 times a week or more), then set to the High level. By default, the results are for maintaining weight with IIFYM . For example; if you can maintain your weight at 2,000 calories per day, then adding vigorous daily exercise to this means you need more calories to maintain your weight. The same rule applies even if your flexible dieting goal is to lose weight. If you are sedentary and your goal is to lose weight, your calorie goal might be (for example) 1,600 calories per day. If you decide to start exercising, the calculator will increase your daily calorie goal (say, to 1,800 cals/day). Light activity: Any activity that burns an additional 200-400 calories for females or 250-500 calories for a males more than your sedentary amount. Moderate activity: Any activity that burns an additional 400-650 calories for females or 500-800 calories for males more than your sedentary amount. Very Active: Any activity that burns more than about 650 calories for females or more than 800 calories for males in addition to your sedentary amount. This varies based on your individual stats, but you can get a more specific amount of calorie burn by simply subtracting your sedentary calorie amount from the chosen exercise level amount.


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The Myth of the 'Best' Macro Ratio


The idea was born in bodybuilding forums by people looking at someone else’s body transformation, asking their macro intake, then reverse engineering it to come up with a macro ratio that is assumed to be somehow special. Protein needs to be set (mainly) according to lean body mass, and fat also (to an extent), so carbohydrate increases and decreases will be used as the main energy balance manipulator. As the diet progresses over many weeks he finally needs to adjust to 2000k Cal per day, and finally 1500k Cal per day by the time he gets on stage. If that guy carries 70kg (154lbs) of lean body mass (LBM), he’ll be consuming ~3.6g/kg LBM of protein at the start, and ~2.1g/kg LBM at the end of the diet, which is an overconsumption of protein initially, and an underconsumption at the end. There is a similar issue with the other macronutrients also when you fix them as a ratio of the overall calorie intake rather than to lean body mass. Fat is important hormonally and allowance should be set to lean body mass (and then adjusted per tolerance). Lean body mass, 3. Ignore macro ratios and let the myth die.


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FREE BODYBUILDING MACRONUTRIENT CALCULATOR


This free bodybuilding macronutrient calculator will show you exactly how many daily calories you require along with the exact grams of protein, carbs and fats you should consume to meet your individual muscle building or fat burning needs. First, the calculator will estimate your daily calorie maintenance level, which is the number of calories you require to maintain your current weight. Second, it will add or subtract the appropriate number of calories from your maintenance level to create either a calorie surplus for muscle growth or a calorie deficit for fat loss. Third, the calculator will translate your calorie intake into an optimal amount of daily protein, carbohydrates and fats to help you meet your goal as effectively as possible. After you’ve received your daily nutrition breakdown, make sure to continue reading further for more important information about how to structure your diet in the most effective way possible, as well as how to adjust your calorie intake over time. Cutting: I want to lean down and lose body fat while maintaining lean muscle and strength. Just hit the submit button below for your macronutrient breakdown… #1 – If your goal is to gain muscle, aim for a total body weight gain of 0.5-1 pounds per week. #2 – If your goal is to lose fat, aim for a total body weight loss of between 1-2 pounds per week. (Note that it’s normal to lose a larger amount in the first 2-3 weeks as your body’s overall water weight decreases and your total food volume drops) So, employ the calorie/macronutrient guidelines given above and then adjust accordingly if you’re gaining or losing body weight at too slow or too quick a rate based on your goal. Also keep in mind that as you gain more muscle or lose more fat, your calories need to be continually adjusted in order to produce further results. Once your body weight stalls, add or subtract 100-150 calories from your current intake (add if you’re trying to gain muscle and subtract if you’re trying to lose fat) and then re-calculate your macros using the calculator or just doing so manually. This is the breakdown that the macronutrient structure is based on… S training, nutrition and supplementation advice to help you build muscle and lose fat in the most productive yet practical way possible.


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Macro Ratios For Maintenance, Growth, and Fat Loss


Macro Ratios For Maintenance, Growth, and Fat Loss. Frank asked, via the Fit Cops Facebook Page , what the proper ratio of Protein, Carbohydrates, and Fat should be, and if the ratios change for maintenance and muscle growth.  The question of ratios for fat loss is usually thrown in there, so we will address that as well.  Thanks Frank, for stepping up and asking this great question!  There are 3 body types (also called somatotypes):  Ectomorph, Mesomorph, and Endomorph. Carbs-  there are 3 types of carbs, simple, complex and fiber. If you are eating to gain muscle mass quickly, you are going to want to adjust to the Ectomorph ratio above, or 25% P, 55% C, and 20% F.  Move the majority of your carbohydrate intake to your post-workout meal, and evening meal.  This will allow your post workout and dinner carbs to be maximized for muscle repair and growth as you sleep. In order to lose body fat, you need to increase your fat intake, while decreasing carbs. So, let’s bring this back around to the topic at hand, fat loss macro ratios.  My suggestion for fat loss is to follow the Endomorphic ratio in the table above, or 35% P, 25% C, and 40% fat.


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Calories and Macros Calculator : How to


Calories and Macros Calculator: How to Calculate For Fat Loss or Muscle Gain. This is essentially your maintenance calories, the amount of calories YOUR body burns based on the measurements and activity level that you enter in. From there, it then shows your target calories that you should consume depending on your goal (-20% calorie deficit for fat loss, and +20% calorie surplus for muscle building). The resulting macro numbers are your protein, carb, and fat daily targets. The only way to lose fat is to be in a calorie deficit (expending more calories than you consume), and the only way to pack on muscle is to be in a calorie surplus (consuming more calories than you expend). When it comes to counting calories for your fitness goals, it’s also important that you are consuming the right amounts of macronutrients (protein, carbs, and fats) for optimal results. To figure out how much of your calorie intake is coming from carbs, you would simply eat your remaining number of calories after protein and fat have been added together. Step 2: Figure out your protein and fat requirements. Carb Intake = Total Calories – Protein Calories – Fat Calories. Therefore –> 1,900 total calories – 536 protein calories – 603 fat calories = 761 carb calories. Once you figure that out, you will then adjust your daily calorie intake depending on your goal — eat less calories for fat loss, or eat more to bulk up. The amount of fats and carbs that you eat will mainly depend on your personal preference. So if you like carbs, eat more of that and less fat.


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Best Macronutrient Ratio For Building Muscle - Part 2


Trial and error is the best way to find out what works best for you. Now that we got that out-of-the-way I want to touch briefly on the myth that you need a lot of protein to build muscle. It has actually been shown the more advanced you are as a bodybuilder the less protein you need for building muscle. ( 1 ) The more muscle you build and the closer you get to your genetic limit, the less muscle you can build after training and in turn less protein is needed to build it. The more protein you need the more you’ll “need” their products. Certainly protein is very good for building muscle, but that doesn’t mean the more the better. Eating too much extra protein will only make you feel fuller and make it more difficult to eat the amount of calories needed to add size. If you tolerate carbs well the more you can eat the better, while being sure to get at least the minimum amount of protein and fat. If you don’t tolerate carbs well and know very high amounts of carbs will build fat fast, you will probably want to lower carbs a little more, but at the same time you still need to be sure to get plenty of carbs in to effectively build muscle. If you do the “see food” diet and pretty much eat as much as possible to build muscle and not worry about fat gain you will likely be setting yourself up for failure. This should be enough to build the muscle you want. The best thing you can do, however, is experiment and see how your body responds.


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Macronutrient Ratio for Lean Muscle Gains – Bulking Macros


Each of the three primary macronutrients provides a certain number of calories: 1 gram of protein provides 4 calories. 1 gram of carbohydrate provides 4 calories. 1 gram of fat provides 9 calories. 35% of calories from proteins. 45% of calories from carbohydrates. 20% of calories from fats. Protein: 35% of 2800 = 980 calories Ă· 4 = 245g per day. Carbs: 45% of 2800 = 1260 calories Ă· 4 = 315g per day. Fat: 20% of 2800 = 560 calories Ă· 9 = 62g per day.


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What's the Best Macronutrient Ratio to Lose Fat


Question #1 | Best Macronutrient Distribution For Fat Loss. Try both and see what is more satisfying for you. Personally, the sweet spot for me is around 40% carbs, 30% protein, and 25-30% fat as a range, which is considered low/moderate fat. If you are already lean, you can increase the fat calories to 40% or more, which is similar to the heart healthy Mediterranean diet. You can also consider 4 laps instead of two, which decreases the intensity a bit, but increases the volume and do that for 5-10 rounds. Question: What site can you recommend to find out nutri-facts for veggies and fruits as they don’t have labels. The other thing about the database is that it has great detail including calorie information for veggies raw, cooked, or fruits with skin and without skin for example. Question #4 | The Difference Between Squats & Lunges. Question: Marc could you explain: why do you need a squat and a lunge exercise, surely they are basically the same movement with little difference between them? Question #5 | Best Protein Bars. The challenge is that most have a lot of “stuff” in them like sugar alchohols (which are safe for consumption but can cause bloating) and many chemicals to keep them preserved on the shelf. Thanks for the question and I hope to give you more specific suggestions soon.


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Macronutrients Ratio and Diet Calculator - Macro Fit


After following your calculated macros consistently for 4 weeks you should notice a change in weight or physical appearance. Only change your macros when your weight loss stalls. Then and only then can you start changing your macros. There is ZERO reason to change you macros if you are still losing weight!


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Macronutrient Ratios Can Make or Break Your Diet


For muscle growth, consume more protein and carbs. Mix fat with carbs and you’ll gain weight, develop insulin resistance, and increase bad cholesterol. How much muscle you gain and how much fat you can lose depends entirely on the macronutrient ratios in your diet. Macronutrients include protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Macronutrient ratios are the percentages of fat, protein, and carbs in your diet. In order to determine the exact amount of nutrients needed, you have to consider your age, body weight, muscle mass, fitness level, and goals. Some people lose weight by sticking to a diet that includes 35% protein, 40% carbs, and 25% fat. The only way to figure out your ideal macronutrient ratio is by trial and error. To keep things simple, calculate your daily ratio of proteins and carbs based on your body weight, and take the rest of your calories from fats. • 100-150 grams of CARBS a day to stay healthy and maintain your weight. • 50-100 grams of CARBS a day to lose weight effortlessly. • 20-50 grams of CARBS a day to get into ketosis and LOSE WEIGHT FAST. If you want to lose fat and preserve muscle, eat 50-100 grams of carbs daily. To lose fat, go under 50 grams of carbs a day. If you take your carbs from refined sugar and junk food, you’ll eventually gain weight.


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Macronutrient Intake for Mass Gains - Body Recomposition


Question: I’ve seen your articles outlining the differences in macronutrient ratios for dieting  (basically the difference between carbs and fat once protein is set), but I’m  wondering if the same applies to gaining muscle mass. Answer: Certainly there are some general tendencies in terms of setting up macronutrient intake for mass gains and I discussed many of them in some detail in The Baseline Diet 2009 Part 1 and The Baseline Diet 2009 Part 2 . With that said, let me look at some of the issues that go into determining what might be optimal for a given individual. In The Protein Book , I actually argued for erring on the side of higher rather than lower (for various reasons discussed in that book) and recommending taking protein up to 1.5 g/lb (3.3 g/kg) when muscle gain is the goal. But that doesn’t change the fact that many have grown well with less protein. But protein somewhere in that range is generally sufficient (I consider the recommendation of 2 g/lb to be useful only for individuals using anabolic steroids). A common recommendation for gaining might be on the order of 2-3 g/lb (4.4-6.6 g/kg), contrast that to a common dieting recommendation of perhaps 1 g/lb (2.2 g/kg). Empirically, while many grow best (while staying relatively leaner) on higher carbohydrates (and lower fat intakes, discussed next), there is also a group that seems to do better with the opposite, relatively moderated carbohydrate intakes with higher fat intakes (or higher protein). And fat makes up the rest. I generally use 20% as an absolute low cutoff point for dietary fat intake with 20-25% being more common, some coaches I know stick to 15% but I think that’s pushing it on the low-end of things. But for a diet containing set at 18 cal/lb with 1.5 g/lb protein and 1 g/lb of carbs, dietary fat would have to be just under 1 g/lb (2.2 g/kg). But to give a general picture of the range of intakes that might be optimal for a given individual under a given set of circumstances: I’ve given some of the factors that go into the decision above but, for now at least, it remains a bit of trial and error beyond that. You’ll have to start with some of the generalities above and then tweak them to find out what might be optimal for you.


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3 Keys To Dialing In Your Macronutrient Ratios


Low fat intake can also impair absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins A , D , E , and K . This will help determine how well you tolerate carbs and establish where in the above ranges you should start. Start with the body type you most resemble, and tweak as necessary. Diet Recommendations: Ectomorphs should stick to the high end of the range for carbohydrates, between 30-60 percent of total calories, depending on whether the goal is mass gains, maintenance, or fat loss. I recommend the high end for mass gains, the mid-upper end for maintenance (45-55 percent), and the low-end for fat loss. At least 25 percent of total calories should come from protein, with the remainder from fat. Again, I recommend the high-end for mass gains (40-50 percent), the middle for maintenance (30-40), and low-end for fat loss (20-30). Because excess carbohydrates in the endomorph's diet end up as fat, a high carbohydrate intake will make it difficult for them to get lean or lose weight. Here, I recommend no more than 30-40 percent carbohydrates for mass gains, the middle range for maintenance (20-30), and low-end for fat loss (10-20). As with the other body types, protein and fat provide the remainder of your calories, with 25-50 percent of total calories from protein and 15-40 percent from fat. In general, women are more efficient at burning fat and less efficient at burning the glycogen stored in muscle. Then, start on the low end for carbohydrates and see how you do.


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Macronutrients Don't Matter


The formula for weight loss is pretty simple: fewer calories consumed + more calories expended = loss of body weight (tissue). Regardless of the root-cause of weight gain, when one attempts to lose that weight, both fat and lean mass can go. A study in The New England Journal of Medicine was performed to determine whether fat and lean tissue changes were influenced by the composition of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in one’s diet. The participants were offered group and individual instructional sessions for two years. The primary outcome was the change in body weight after two years in two-by-two factorial comparisons of: Both of the above compared to the highest and lowest carbohydrate content. At the one year point, most began to regain body weight. By two years, weight loss was as follows: Similar for those assigned to both the 15% and 25% protein (6.6 and 7.9 pounds). Exactly the same for those in the 20% and 40% fat groups (7.3 pounds). The 65% and 35% carbohydrate groups were 6.4 and 7.5 pounds of weight loss, respectively. Of the 80% of participants who completed the study the average weight loss was 8.8 pounds. Satiety, hunger, satisfaction with the diet, and attendance at group sessions were similar for all diets. The researchers concluded that any reduced-calorie diet results in clinically meaningful weight loss. Reduce calories + increased energy expenditure = weight loss.


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What's The Best Macronutrient Ratio For Weight Loss


The average American diet contains about 49% carbohydrates, 34% fat and only 12 – 16% protein (St. But before you worry about optimising the macronutrient ratio of your diet there are two important things to keep in mind. In order to find the ideal macronutrient ratio for fat loss we need to look at how the different macronutrients are digested in the body. That is, fat requires the least amount of energy to be digested, carbs come second and protein requires the most energy. The main point here is that by eating a higher ratio of protein in your diet, it will take your body more energy to digest this and therefore you “save” calories by eating more protein. Your body can deal with low amounts of fat for a while but in the long-term, very low fat diets are not healthy. Once you have covered your protein needs and fat needs, the rest of your calories should come from carbohydrates. As outlined above, it’s best to calculate your protein and fat needs first and then add it the carbohydrates last. Since your body doesn’t need a specific amount of carbs, you can use these to fill the rest of your calories. As you can see from the example above, compared to the average American diet you would mainly lower your carbohydrate intake in favour of more protein. If you want to optimise this diet even more for fat loss you would have to lower your carbs further in favour of protein.


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Macronutrient Ratios for Fat Loss - Back to Eden Fitness


Macronutrient Ratios for Fat Loss. There is no magical macronutrient ratio for fat loss as every body type has its own set of requirements. The macronutrient ratios below are just guidelines to help you get started and find the best diet for your body and your goal. If you have more serious digestive issues, consult a healthcare practitioner to diagnose and treat your condition for better health and weight loss. Most ectomorphs have a high tolerance for carbohydrates and a fast metabolism. A good starting point for an ectomorph would be 25% protein, 55% carbs and 20% fat. Typically, mesomorphs have a moderate tolerance for carbohydrates and a moderate metabolic rate. A good starting point for this body type would be 30% protein, 40% carbs and 30% fat. Endomorphs gain body fat easily, have a low tolerance for carbohydrates and a slower metabolic rate than the other body types. If you fall in this category and have no idea how to start losing weight, start with a macronutrient ratio of 35% protein, 25% carbs and 40% fat. For some people, they can eat pounds of fruit and lose weight while others have to limit their intake of fruit in order to see fat loss. It all depends on your body – listen to it and experiment. Fruits and vegetables contain carbs, protein and fat, some more than others.


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Flexible Dieting : How to Calculate Your Macros


“What are your macros?” This is one of my favorite questions to ask and one of the more common ones I get asked. Macros, short for macronutrients (proteins, fats, and carbohydrates), form the basis of Flexible Dieting/IIFYM. These macros are the basis of all calories you consume. Your ability to calculate and adjust your macros correctly will largely determine whether or not you reach your physique goals with Flexible Dieting. But starting with some solid guidelines, even if it isn’t quite right, can be a good start on your journey to dominate your goals, and getting the body you want. When getting started with Flexible Dieting the most important thing to calculate is your TDEE (Total Daily Energy Expenditure). Consistently eat less than this and you lose weight or eat more than this and you gain weight. D., St Jeor formula is one of the most popular and one of the most respected methods used to calculate your TDEE. If you want to lose weight I recommend dropping your overall calories by no more than 20% to start with – So in the example, this would take the guys calories from 3,250 to 2,600 for weight loss. So in the example, this would take the guys calories from 3,250 to 3,900 for weight gain. We do all of this for you with our IIFYM Macro Calculator . We allocated 644 calories (161 g) to Protein, 813 calories (90 g) to Fat and we now allocate the rest, 1793 calories, to Carbohydrates. Final Macros: 161 g Protein, Fat 90 g and 448 g Carbohydrates for this guy to maintain his current weight. Do the above and you will be well on your way to getting started with Flexible Dieting.


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Ideal Macro Percentages For Fat Loss and Body


About "Ideal Macro Percentages For Fat Loss & Body Recomposition" from internet: Best Macronutrient Breakdown For Fat Loss - Lean Bodies Consulting. Best Macronutrient Distribution For Fat Loss? Level is more important that the macronutrient ratio to prevent fat loss. Is There A Magical Macronutrient Ratio For Fat Loss? Ratios for fat loss is no easy task. More important that the macronutrient ratio to prevent fat loss. Ideal Macro Percentages For Fat Loss & Body Recomposition. What is the Best Macronutrient Ratio for Weight Loss? Determining macronutrient ratios for fat loss is no easy task.


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Bulking Macronutrient Ratios Guide - Body Transformation


By carefully planning your calorie intake and balancing your protein, carbohydrate, and fat ratios, you can be sure to maximize muscle gain while minimizing fat gain. The first step in determining your bulking macronutrient ratios is to set your calorie surplus. Eating only a slight surplus is a critical part of setting your bulking macronutrient ratios if you want to minimize fat gain. As you can see, the first step in setting your bulking macronutrient ratios is to determine your maintenance level of calories. By eating only a modest calorie surplus and keeping your weight gain slow and steady, you can be sure that you are minimizing fat gain. A protein intake of 1.0 g/lb is good when setting your bulking macronutrient ratios. 0.4-0.5g/lb, or 20-25% of total calories, is a good range for fat intake when setting your bulking macronutrient ratios. So, setting your fat intake between 20-25% of your total calories, or consuming 0.4-0.5 g/lb of body weight, is a good range when setting your bulking macronutrient ratios. As when setting a carbohydrate intake for a fat loss diet , determining carbohydrate intake when setting your bulking macronutrient ratios is difficult and controversial. As you can see, determining your carbohydrate intake when setting your bulking macronutrient ratios is not easy. Determining your calorie intake and bulking macronutrient ratios is the most important part of any muscle building plan. After establishing your calorie surplus, you then have to set your bulking macronutrient ratios: 1-3g/lb of body weight is the general recommendation, but you could also set your carbohydrate intake by establishing your calorie level, protein and fat intake, and then using carbohydrates to “fill-in” the rest of your leftover calories.


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The Definitive Guide to Carb Cycling - Muscle For Life


Is the carb cycling diet effective for fat loss and muscle growth? Another common selling point of the carb cycling diet is the claim that a traditional approach to dieting (steady protein, carbohydrate, and fat intake throughout the week, with planned cheats/refeeds) simply can’t get you to the “super lean” category (6% and under for men, 16% and under for women) without burning up a ton of muscle. What is the Carb Cycling Diet? Or you may do 3 low-carb days followed by 1 high-carb day, and then back to the low-carb and so on. So the question of carb cycling and weight loss becomes… Enthusiasts of the carb cycling diet will claim that your low-carb days will greatly accelerate your fat loss over what it would be with a traditional approach to dieting. 40% from fat, 15% from protein, and 45% from carbohydrate. A ketogenic diet, consisting of 60% of calories from fat, 35% from protein, and 5% from carbohydrate. A traditional diet, consisting of 30% of calories from fat, 30% from protein, and 40% from carbohydrate. The best diet is the one you can stick to, and you can get as lean as you want with traditional dieting. Want a workout program and flexible diet plan that will help you build muscle and lose fat? Can You Use Carb Cycling to Lose Fat and Build Muscle Simultaneously?


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Best Macro Ratio For Fat Loss


Q I’m trying to lose some fat, but everywhere I go to look for helpful information, I get conflicting views on the proper macronutrient ratio. In reality, when you’re trying to lose weight, there’s no ironclad macronutrient law for mapping out your diet plan. Your body type, metabolism and weekly physical activity level all have some bearing on your ideal percentages for that moment in time. It may change if and when your body weight or body fat fluctuates, or if you run into any plateaus. The macronutrient ratio I typically play with for maintenance purposes is 50% protein, 35% carbs and 15% fats. That ratio won’t necessarily work for you because you have a different body type, fitness goal and activity level. Ectomorph: If you’re an ectomorph, you’re naturally thin with skinny limbs and a high tolerance for carbohydrates. A good starting macronutrient ratio for you would be something like 25% protein, 55% carbs and 20% fat. They have a moderate carbohydrate tolerance and a moderate metabolic rate. If you’re an endomorph, try a ratio of 35% protein, 25% carbs and 40% fat. Don’t let your body type be an excuse for not reaching your goals. Sometimes, decreasing your carbs and increasing your good fats can show remarkable fat-loss results.


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Best Macronutrient Ratio For Building Muscle


The summer has come and many people have started to focus on building more muscle to show off at the beach. Certainly getting enough protein in your diet is imperative for building muscle, considering it’s the only. So if you aren’t eating enough protein you aren’t maximizing muscle-protein synthesis and in turn not maximizing your potential muscle gains. However going above and beyond the necessary amount will only be added calories and be taking away from the other macronutrients which also have benefits for building muscle. It’s my opinion for individuals looking to build muscle they should consume somewhere between .8 and 1.3 grams per pound of body weight daily. Carbs are very protein sparing and they give you the energy needed to fuel those intense workouts needed to build muscle. Amino acids and fats for energy which in turn means you will be losing amino acids that could be used for muscle-protein synthesis. Of course all carbs are not created equal and you want to try to consume mostly complex carbohydrates with a low GI number to keep fat gain to a minimum. The consumption of fats is another fine line when it comes to how much you should eat. As previously mentioned too few fats and you will likely have low levels of circulating testosterone ( 3 ) but at the same time while it’s true if you eat a lot of fat you’ll have more circulating testosterone, at the same time if you eat too much fat you won’t have enough room to fit in the proper amounts of the other macronutrients and you will be deficient in those areas. The other question when it comes to fats is which kinds of fats should you consume? This doesn’t mean you should eat mostly saturated fats though as saturated fats are more likely to be stored as body fat than unsaturated fats are. The fat you want to try to avoid at all costs are trans-fats. These fats are very difficult for your body to metabolize and in turn are easily stored as fat.


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Macronutrients and Micronutrients for Muscle Building and


Macronutrients and Micronutrients for Muscle Building and Fat Loss. This article discusses what macronutrients and micronutrients are in addition to the optimal ratios of these nutrients for building muscles and losing fat. Proteins are the building blocks of the body and responsible for making up the different structures that form the body. From a perspective of muscle building and fat loss, excess carbohydrates in the diet, greater than a person’s energy requirements, cause the body to convert the excess energy into fat. Proteins are required for the anabolism effect of the body, i.e. The building and repairing of the body, and form the most important component of the diet for those seeking to gain muscle mass. The macronutrient ratio for this is, understandably, different as compared to that for muscle building. Thus, the optimal ratio of macronutrients for fat loss differs from that for muscle building. For proteins, the optimal sources are egg whites, fish, and chicken. In order to meet the demands of proteins in both muscle building and fat loss, a supplement that deserves special mention is whey protein .


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Macro ratios fat loss


Macro ratios fat loss. View Poll Results: which macro ratios will be the best for fat loss? Im looking for the best macro ratios for fat loss. Rep Power: 84. The rest of your calories can be split between carbs and fat however you'd like. Rep Power: 73. 1) As said above, those ratios are too close to make any difference. That's usually how people do it, but you have less carbs than fat and most diets I've seen are the other way around (except Keto). Rep Power: 70624. Ratios are meaningless.


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Weight Loss and Macronutrient Ratio


Weight Loss and Macronutrient Ratio. Calories are more important for weight loss than macronutrient ratios. The best diet for weight loss isn't the same for everyone. A study published in "The New England Journal of Medicine" in February 2009 found that diets have similar effects on weight loss after two years regardless of whether they emphasize carbohydrates, fat or protein. You don't have to give up carbohydrates or fat to lose weight, you just have to control the number of calories you eat. Increasing the ratio of protein to carbohydrates can result in greater improvements in the ratio of lean muscle mass to fat mass in your body as you lose weight. A diet with a ratio of 3.5 grams of protein to each gram of carbohydrate is more effective than one with a ratio of 1.4 grams of protein to each gram of carbohydrate at increasing fat loss while minimizing muscle loss, according to a study published in "The Journal of Nutrition" in February 2003. Following an energy-restricted diet that is high in protein but low in fat to lose weight may improve your triglyceride levels more than a traditional low-fat diet while still resulting in the same amount of weight loss, according to a study published in "The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" in June 2005. This type of diet produced a similar amount of weight loss to low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets, but improved insulin resistance to a greater degree, according to a study published in "The New England Journal of Medicine" in July 2008.


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How To Calculate Macros - Step By Step - Muscle Class


You’ve heard how important macros are, but do you know how to calculate your macros? Macros are stuff that makes up the calories you eat. Determine your daily maintenance calories. If you chose to bulk, you are going to need to eat above your maintenance level. That’s how many calories you should aim to eat each day. If you choose to cut, you are going to need to eat below your maintenance level. That’s how many calories you should ai to each every day. Determine your daily protein requirements. My protein intake is the highest when I am cutting because when you are cutting, your goal should be to keep your hard earned muscle. I recommend 20%-30% of your calories come from fat. Your remaining calories should come from carbohydrates. Since 1,000 of my calories is coming from protein, and 480 of my daily calories are coming from fat, I have 920 calories left to consume every day. You should track your progress, if you haven’t gained/lost weight after a week or two alter your calorie intake by 250-500 calories.


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How to Calculate Macros for Cutting Fat Without Losing


With that said, today I will be sharing my simple formula for calculating macronutrients for fat loss. This is why it is very important that you take a slow and calculated approach to your fat loss. What are macronutrients: Nutrients that the body uses in relatively large amounts – proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. As I mentioned in the article “ How to Calculate Macros for Lean Bulking ”, In order to calculate your EXACT maintenance level and establish a “perfect” macronutrient split for yourself can be time consuming, expensive, and simply not worth the efforts. This is why I have chosen to give you a simple and very basic starting point that will do the trick.


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Calorie Intake Calculator and Macro Calculator


You exercise more and it does the same thing. That is the amount of protein in grams you will eat per day. Calculate the total calories from the protein. If the protein is 140g and there are 4 calories per gram of protein that means you will be eating. Now calculate the fat. So the breakdown of your calories and macros is: 1400 calories per day. Always start with grams of protein and back calculate calories and the other macros from that. If you are over 200 pounds, 200g is the max protein intake we set. Calculate the total calories using a 40-30-30 ratio (carbs:protein:fat). Protein is 200g and there are 4 calories per gram of protein. This means the total calorie intake of protein would be 4 X 200 = 800 calories of protein. To get the grams remember there are 4 calories per gram of carb so 1080 divided by 4= 270g of carb. So the breakdown of your calories or macros in this scenario is 2700 calories per day. Use this as a starting place only and then create the right calorie level and macro-nutrient ratio for you. The ratio that keeps HEC in check and delivers the body composition results you want is the right one for you.


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Diet Plans : Considerations for Muscle Gain


Diet Plans: Considerations for Muscle Gain, Fat Loss, and Stubborn Body Types. The second rule of eating is picking a goal and sticking to it for more than a month. It will help you understand what you we know about good diet design, as well as what factors might relate to seeing the most results out of your body. This means breaking down your meals into types of foods, and then just filling in the gaps with what you want to eat. You see, research in the New England Journal of Medicine has suggested that those on a weight loss diet tend to under-report how much they eat by as much as 47 percent and overestimate how much exercise they perform by 51 percent. Recording your foods does not have to be a long-term approach; just the opposite, it’s a short term investment that will offer you eating freedom for the long-term. At the same time, it will allow you to be honest with what’s happening in your body and why you might not be seeing the results you want. While it’s certainly possible to lose fat and gain muscle at the same time (despite what many people might suggest), maximizing your results is about maximizing your focus. If muscle gain is what you want, getting the most out of your plan might mean adding a little bit of fat. As I tell my clients , the goal is to eat for the body you want, not the body you have. For instance, going to low carb as you push intensity can stimulate your hunger hormones at the same time as decreasing the hormones that suppress hunger. This leaves you wanting to eat everything and the kitchen sink, all while experiencing a drop in the hormones that regulate your metabolic rate. Or more importantly, they set up your body for rapid weight and fat regain once the dieting phase is over. The worst thing that can happen is for you to read the numbers above and think, “I’m set for life.” It’s not fair, but very lean people can “get away” with eating more carbs and treats, whereas those with more weight to lose don’t have as much room to slip up in the amounts that they eat.


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The Basics of Body Recomposition


First, determine your protein intake in both grams and calories. Multiply your bodyweight by 1.5 (this is the total grams of protein you eat). Multiply your result by 4 (this is the total number of calories that will come from those grams of protein). Second, determine your carbohydrate intake in both grams and calories. Multiply your bodyweight by 1.5 (this is the total grams of carbs you eat). Multiply your result by 4 (this is the total number of calories that will come from those grams of carbs). Add the calories from your protein and carbs together. Take your remaining calories, and divide that number by 9. The result is your fat intake in grams. Multiply your bodyweight by 0.35 (this is the total grams of carbs you eat). I subtract this from my rest day calories and see I have 849.2 calories remaining.


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Macronutrient Manipulation for Fat Loss and Muscle Gain


Macronutrient ratios are the percentages of protein, carbohydrates, and fat in your diet. For example, let’s say 30% of your total calories come from protein, 50% from carbohydrates, and 20% from fat. Fat is the most calorie dense macronutrient and contains 9 calories of energy per gram. So, if you wanted to eat a 2000 calorie diet with 30% of your calories from Protein, 50% from Carbohydrates, and 20% from fat, you would eat about 150 grams of protein, 250 grams of carbohydrates, and 44 grams of fat. The US RDA recommends that you eat 91 grams of protein, 65 grams of fat, and 263 grams of carbohydrates on a 2000 calorie per day diet. So, the US RDA recommends around 18% Protein, 53% Carbohydrates, and 29% Fat. The US RDA recommendations will not help you build muscle and burn fat optimally. The optimal macronutrient ratios for building muscle and burning fat will be discussed in the next section: I want you to start with the ratios above for the basic diet plan. You will never be short of fuel with the basic macronutrient ratios above. The reasoning behind this is you are giving your body less carbohydrates for fuel, more protein to increase metabolism, and more fat in hopes that your body will start to burn fat as a source of energy. You will build muscle and burn fat from Day 1 when using the WLC System!


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Macronutrient Percentages


Should I keep them the same for a month and see how lean I can get that extra weight to be? Focus on getting your goals for fat and protein then fill in the rest of your cals with carbs. - Carbs for the rest of your calories to achieve a 500 cal surplus. On a day to day basis, your macro percentages are gonna vary based on the type of foods you eat that day but as long as you meet your goals for fat, protein, and total cals you'll be good long term. For example, you might start by only tracking your protein, then your protein and your fat. At the end of the day, this is what is going to cause you to either gain or lose weight. So the most vital component of the 3 macros that make up our calories is Protein. So if you're bulking and you figure out the calories you need and you are making the gains you want. If you're BF% is high you can probably get away with decreasing the 30% from protein and get those calories from fat instead (which will make your job easier since fat has more calories per gram than protein). If you have a very low BF% you might want to keep your protein intake constant but lower your carb intake and get those calories from fat. If you're cutting and you have a high BF% you can probably lower the 30% from protein and get those calories from complex carbs that are high in fiber. With a low BF% you're best bet is to try to lower the calories from fat if possible and replace them with complex carbs that are high in fiber. All the other attempts I've seen as suggestions for reevaluation are more geared towards the overall calories intake (are you losing/gaining x% of your total BW). If this is what you've consistently been doing, if your BF% has decreased it would seem like you should slowly increase the protein%. If your BF% has stayed relatively the same/increased with your gains then your body is probably making all the muscle it can and you should consider decreasing your caloric surplus slightly but keep your protein% constant.


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How to Build Muscle and Lose Fat


Mike, in this article you say some people can cut fat and burn muscle at the same time. Do you know of studies which prove you can lose fat and gain muscle at the same time? This is 20 kilos for the bar and 30 kilos of weight. With that being said i do have a question for you, how much of a calorie deficit should i be on to maximize the results of both fatloss and muscle gain? I just wanted to let you know that for a long time i was a believer of the High Rep = more definition and Low Rep = more strength, but i see that it has more to do with body fat %. I want to lose body fat and build muscle at the same time, so that I can continue to lose weight (or at least not gain it). So you say that carb and fat have the same energy affect on muscle development? Again part of the process is learning your body and tweaking this as you go on. Unless you’re new to this style of lifting, you can’t build muscle and lose fat at the same time. Can you fasten the process of losing fat and maintaining muscle? I just signed up for your newsletter and read the How to Build Muscle and Lose Fat. I know that this is what you recommend in the article, but I’m a bit concerned my body is going to starve and start storing fat. And thanks for the support! What do you think I should do to get the most out of this gym (in order to build muscle and lose fat)?


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Macronutrient Ratios for your muscle building diet


MACRONUTRIENT RATIOS FOR YOUR MUSCLE BUILDING DIET. Want to build muscle size, maintain muscle mass or get lean? Eating the right macronutrients and hitting the ideal macronutrient ratios in your muscle building diet plan will help you reach your goals faster! If you want to build muscle size and bulk up your diet will have a higher carbohydrate ratio. If you want to maintain muscle mass your diet plan will contain moderate levels of carbohydrate and to get lean and ripped you should be consuming a higher protein, lower carbohydrate macronutrient ratio. If you want to build muscle size, maintain muscle mass or get ripped there’s nothing more important you can add to your muscle building diet plan than protein. Good sources for your muscle building diet include, lean beef, chicken, fish, eggs, dairy and a protein shake. If you want to gain muscle size carbohydrate is the key macronutrient for gains. Examples of good carbohydrates for your muscle building diet include whole grains, sweet potatoes and whole wheat pasta.  Pro-Muscle is high in protein, packed with muscle building amino acids and contains complex carbohydrate energy to fuel your growing muscles.


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Best Macros for fat loss - Men's Health


Whats the best Macro set up for fat loss while in a calorie deficit? There's no magic ratio for fat loss, much depends on your own body's way of handling the food and how much training you're doing. On my current cutting program I cycle my carbs and fat depending on the training I do that day (weights + cardio vs. I could average it out and aim for a consistent amount each day but I prefer to use my carbs mainly as an energy source when the training is heavy. So you eat based on what your going to do for the day in terms of your carb intake? Just remember that carb cycling is simply a preference, much like intermittent fasting protocols are so in the end go with what works best for you. For me it depends on the bread. That's not uncommon if you're doing intermittent fasting but train in the morning and then save the rest of your calories for dinner. And the best part is tomorrow is a re-feed day! For me I think it becomes more of an issue for guys like me who do their training first thing in the morning but IF is flexible and I can adapt with a small protein shake. Just remember that IF is not the holy grail for fat loss. Really, I am just thinking of starting to make 3-4 loaves a week for my family in lieu of buying it from the store with all the stabilizers, preservatives, added sugar and what not. Thanks again for the recipe! The best (and most dangerous) time is when the bread comes right out of the oven but it also freezes really well for storage.


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Ask The Macro Manager : What's The Best Macronutrient Ratio


Ask The Macro Manager: What's The Best Macronutrient Ratio For Building Muscle? Harness the power of proper nutrition to build muscle without gaining fat. What's the ideal macronutrient ratio for building muscle? To gain the most muscle with the least amount of fat (or even sparking some fat loss ), I like to use the calorie breakdown of 40 percent carbohydrates , 30 percent protein and 30 percent fat . This is the overall breakdown for the day, but during the day not all meals will follow this structure. Throughout the day, your fueling needs change with your body's ability to optimally process and use different types of fuels. This kind of meal will meet the body's needs quickly, with lower fat expediting digestion. So this meal should be high in protein, high in fat, and low in carbs. Throughout the day, between post-workout meals and the last meal of the day, the amount of fast-acting grain and starch-based carbohydrates should decrease, while the amount of fat and vegetables increase.


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