Been Working Out But No Weight Loss


What Happens to Your Body When You Stop Working Out


THE SITUATION: You had a crazy month at work and stopped your usual four-day-a-week gym habit cold turkey. THE EFFECT ON YOUR BOD: Doing a mix of strength training and cardio is optimal for weight loss or control, muscle building, and aerobic health. Stop for a month, and you may notice that some areas get softer, that you're not able to lug as many heavy groceries, and that you get winded a little faster from taking the stairs. "In a study of beginners who exercised for two months, their strength increased by 46 percent, and when they stopped training for two months, they lost 23 percent—half the gains they'd made," says exercise scientist Wayne Westcott, Ph. For strength training, start with about 75 percent of the resistance you'd been using—and increase as you feel you can. You’ll be back to where you were in probably half the length of time that you took off. THE SITUATION: You used to weight train like crazy, but for the past several months, all you’ve fit in is a few sessions a week on the treadmill. THE EFFECT ON YOUR BOD: In this case, your aerobic health should be in good shape, though you may notice that your strength and muscle tone have diminished some. THE EFFECT ON YOUR BOD: A break like this isn't a major problem aerobically for someone who was in really good cardio shape. "Just don't expect to come back at full-speed right away." He recommends easing back in using your heart rate (the zones may have changed from when you were at your peak) and perceived exertion—a seven on a scale of one to 10. In the case of bodyweight training (yoga) versus weight training (Cross Fit), expect your strength to be down when you first return to the gym. THE SITUATION: You got injured and haven't been able (or wanted) to work out at all for six months.


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How long does it take to see results? - Weight Loss


I have been working out in the gym 6 days a week for 90-120 minutes I started out at 175lbs and I am currently still 175lbs. What matters most is not so much what the scale says but how you feel and the subtle difference in the way your clothes fit. I also have a muscular build, and if I work out for more than 30 minutes a day, I tend to *gain* weight, unless the workouts are easy. Also, this is very unscientific, but I have found that if I am very routinized and eat the same thing every day and work out the same every day, my body gets stuck at that weight. That means you can eat the amount that your body would typically burn in one day with no exercise, and then exercise to burn 500 calories, or you can eat that amount minus 250 calories, and then exercise to burn 250 calories, or you can cut the food intake to 500 calories less than you'd typically burn in a day. But it's basically the amount of food you can eat, consistently, without exercising, and maintain your current weight. But in the end it is worth it, you end up leaner and stronger. Let’s assume you go out and buy two rolls of paper towels, each with only 84 paper towels on it (one for each day of the challenge). I have only lost 5 lbs and that was in the 1st month. Besides all the water weight loss your energy will incress and sleep will be more beneficial. Building muscle will help you in the weight loss process since more muscle aids in burning fat and calories. But, you will get over it.pls.keep it up with all the exercise routine and control your calorie intake. OP: If this exercise level is new for you, you may be putting on muscle and that would account for some of your lack of weight loss. You can't eat a lot and lose weight. Its extremely frustrating to watch others work less than you do and drop the weight like its nothing.


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The Five Biggest Weight Loss Blunders


Losing weight can be a frustrating, anxiety-inducing process, but it doesn't have to be if you have the right attitude. Find out about some common weight loss mistakes you may be making and stop sabotaging yourself. Falling off the exercise and diet wagon happens to everyone. It's also tempting to ditch healthy eating after a massive Oreo-fest, but renewing your commitment after a boo-boo is the most important thing you can do to succeed. If you don't have time for your regular workout, use whatever time you have to be active. If you ate too much, admit your mistake and move on. After weeks of exercise and healthy eating, frustration often sets in when the scale doesn't move. Remember, you didn't gain weight overnight and you won't lose it overnight either. You should feel energetic and alert. You may notice you sleep better, your body feels stronger and you're less stressed. The benefits of exercise go way beyond weight loss and appearance! Doing The Same Thing and Expecting Different Results. It's important to do exercises that you enjoy, but if you've been doing the same ones for months (or even years), you've probably reached a weight loss plateau and, even worse, complete boredom with your workouts. People often view exercise as punishment, something that cancels out the naughty things you ate yesterday. Don't you want to be the best YOU possible?


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Lift to Lose Weight · Experience Life


If you want to get leaner, say the latest studies and the smartest trainers, it’s time to start strength training. Many gym-goers — and even some health and fitness professionals — still believe that strength training is only for people who want to gain weight in the form of shirt-stretching muscles, and that long-duration exercise like running and cycling is the fastest way to lose fat. The real key to fat loss is high-intensity exercise, especially strength training — with real weights, real sweat and real effort. But what most bathroom scales won’t tell you is how much of the weight you lose is in the form of fat, and how much of it is muscle. The best way to do that is resistance training , which will help you hold on to your muscle tissue while you lose fat. This much is known: Aerobic activity burns fat while you’re exercising, but anaerobic (meaning without oxygen) activity burns fat in the minutes, hours and days following exercise, as your body recovers from your workout. But if you add up the fat burned by the two activities during and after exercise — including what’s burned between sets during the workout itself — anaerobic activity comes out ahead. And it’s likely that the fat-burning effect of an anaerobic workout is cumulative, so that with each successive set, you burn incrementally more fat, leading to a kind of fat-burning jackpot at the end of your workout. Before you even begin your strength-training session, your adrenal glands secrete epinephrine and norepinephrine, which aid in producing more force, blood flow, and the metabolism of sugar and fat. (For more on an especially effective fat-burning method, see “Training Tips,” below and the “ Rev Up Your Metabolism! But for now, they aren’t sweating the details — and neither should you. Metabolic resistance training, a system popularized by Alwyn Cosgrove, MS, CSCS, coauthor of The New Rules of Lifting for Life (Avery, 2012), is one of the best forms of exercise to build muscle, rev up your metabolism and burn the most fat in the least amount of time. If you gain muscle and lose fat, you’ll be fitter — but the scale might tell you you’re heavier. Lose muscle and gain fat, and you’ll be fatter — but the scale will read lighter.


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Weight Loss Plateau


What are some solutions to break through your stubborn weight loss plateau? This article will delve into the dynamics of a weight loss plateau and offer you solutions to overcome it. The primary purpose of tracking your body weight is (1) for accountability and (2) as a proxy for measuring fat loss. If you do not experience a weight loss plateau as you approach your ideal body weight , consider yourself very, very lucky. Weight loss plateaus are to be expected as you are losing weight. 2) The More Weight You Lose, The More Weight Loss Slows. 3) Losing Weight Becomes Harder The Closer You Get To Your Ideal Weight. Not only does the pace of weight loss slow down, but your body will work harder to hold on to your fat stores the leaner you become. 3 Steps To Break Your Weight Loss Plateau. Weight Loss Plateau Step #1: Re-evaluate Your Calorie Intake. Weight Loss Plateau Step #2: Control the “Calorie Creep” What happens if you still can’t break your weight loss plateau? Have you ever experienced a weight loss plateau?


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Working Out and Eating Right But not Losing Weight


Working Out and Eating Right But Not Losing Weight. Eating right and working out requires sacrificing your time and some of life's simple pleasures. When you don't see results on the scale, you may be tempted to throw it over for snacks and computer games. There may be adjustments you can make that will lead to weight loss, but even if you never lose a pound, a proper diet and exercise provide other benefits that could lead to a longer, healthier and even happier life. While intense resistance training can help with weight loss, you generally need a minimum of 150 minutes of moderate or 75 minutes of intense cardio each week for good health and more to lose weight. Even if you consume the right foods, avoid the bad ones and get in some cardio each week, you won't lose weight unless your combination of diet and exercise creates a calorie deficit. Determine how many calories you can cut without sacrificing nutrition, as well as how you can increase the time or intensity of your cardio exercise to burn more calories to arrive at the deficit you need. Working out on an elliptical for the same amount of time burns 540 calories. When you gain major muscle while losing fat, it's not unusual for your weight on the scale to stay the same or even increase. If you're creating a calorie deficit but not losing weight, consider having a trained professional test your body fat. If you're creating the necessary calorie deficit and still don't feel like you're losing weight, you may not be giving it enough time. Due to differences in scales and normal weight fluctuations throughout the day, your weight loss for the first couple of weeks may not even register. If after that time you don't see any perceptible weight loss, consider consulting your physician or a nutritionist.


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Why Has My Weight Loss Stopped and Can I Break a Plateau


You are at: Home » Exercise »Why Has My Weight Loss Stopped and Can I Break a Plateau? Before you get discouraged, keep in mind that in the long-term you will overcome if you are consistent and persistent. Make sure you are truly eating the calories you think you are by journaling your food intake. Record your exercise in the same journal, and on the same days as the food intake, and make sure to record the intensity of the activity as well (to measure intensity, use the intensity scale below). For example, if you notice you eat poorly in the evenings, modify that for one or two weeks and see if it increases your weight loss. Here are some questions to ask yourself and things to look for as you go through your journal that might give you a clue as to what may be causing your plateau: Are the foods I’m eating mostly natural and unprocessed? If you are, indeed, eating a healthy, low-calorie diet and exercising regularly (and have proof from your journal that you’re doing everything right), try to change your exercise routine in one or two ways. If your exercise is strictly cardio, introduce strength training into the mix to increase muscle mass (and thus increase metabolism). If you’ve been strength training regularly, you may see your weight plateau or the scale even move up, since strength training builds lean muscle tissue, and muscle is more dense, and consequently weighs more than fat. If you have a scale that measures body composition, use this feature and track your progress over time. Take measurements every 4 weeks as that should be enough time for your body to adapt to the exercise and diet. Don’t let your perception of what you think it should be doing get in the way of what positive things you’ve done and the progress you’ve made. Try this for two weeks, then ease back into your prior routine again and see if you notice a difference in how your body responds. If, however, you’ve found that you’ve been too lax in your workouts, here’s the intensity training schedule mentioned earlier for you to incorporate into your cardio workouts.


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I’ve Been Dieting and Exercising—So Why Haven’t I Lost


The answer: Most likely, you’re overestimating how much you’re dieting and exercising. You're not working out as much as you think you are. Or, when you really stop to think about it, are you spending a hefty chunk of time thinking about getting on the elliptical, choosing which magazine to read, chatting with your friends on the mats, etc. If you’re guilty of one (or all) of the above, consider investing in a pedometer so you have documented evidence about how much you’re actually exercising, says Young. The last reason you could be at a weight-loss standstill is that you’re repeating the same workout routine over and over again. “Your body will reach a plateau if you do that, and you’re not going to see results,” says Young—so it’s really important to vary it up.


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Why haven’t I lost weight or belly fat after two months of


I’m 38, and I have been going to the gym for about two months now. I can’t seem to lose belly fat and trim down. I work out 6 days out of the week, and I have gained strength and endurance. Or a light muffin with egg, Canadian bacon and cheese, which is about 250 calories. After lunch I eat a snack such as a fiber bar or mix nuts and dried fruit. Why can’t I seem to trim down and tone my midsection and lose weight? The rest of your intake for the day sounds reasonable as it’s focused on plants, with multiple eating sessions, and has minimal added sugar. But how much you eat and when can have an impact. Depending on the timing you work out, swapping out the nuts for a low-fat yogurt cup or 2 ounce protein bar may offer more support for muscle development and thus getting lean.


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5 Reasons You’re not Losing Weight at the Gym - Shape Magazine


Make sure your workout is working for you. You belong to the gym, and you even make time to go, but still the scale isn't budging. While your intentions should be applauded, here are some reasons you're not seeing the slimming results you're after. Cardio workouts aren't intense enough: In order to lose weight you need to do the kind of cardio that gets your heart pumping. Your weights are too light: Strength training builds muscle, and muscle increases your metabolic rate , which translates to calories burned. Watch yourself in a mirror or meet with a personal trainer because if you're doing the moves incorrectly, like using momentum instead of your muscle strength, which can mean that you're not getting as good a workout as possible. Same workout, different day: There's something nice about getting into a routine, but if you're constantly repeating the exact workout day in and day out, you're more likely to reach a plateau. It'll not only challenge your muscles, but you'll get a more effective workout, which translates to a leaner, more sculpted bod.


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Weight Loss Plateau Myth : Muscle Weighs


Weight Loss Plateau Myth: Muscle Weighs More Than Fat? Is it possible that I’m still losing fat but just gaining equal amounts of muscle? I’ve heard muscle weighs more than fat, so I figured the muscle I’m building is replacing the fat I’m losing and it’s causing my weight to remain the same even though I’m still losing fat just fine? Now, since “weight” can be a few different things besides just fat, IT IS possible that they are losing fat, but that “fat weight” is being counterbalanced by the gain in some other form of weight. So sure, there is a possibility that a pound of fat was successfully lost in the same period of time that a pound of something else was gained, thus making it appear as though you’ve hit a fat loss plateau even though some fat WAS actually lost (which means you’re just experiencing a weight loss plateau, and now you can see the difference between the two). Is it possible that this is what has been happening to this person for 4 weeks straight, AND that the weight they are gaining is muscle? Is it possible that they are losing fat but just gaining muscle at an equal rate? Fat loss is too of course, but it absolutely destroys muscle growth in terms of the rate and quantity it commonly occurs at. So the clear message here is that in most of the cases where you see NO weight loss for an extended period of time and think it’s because “muscle weighs more than fat” and you’re really losing fat but just simultaneously gaining an equal amount of muscle at an equal rate… (More here: Can You Lose Fat And Build Muscle At The Same Time? If your primary goal is losing fat and you haven’t lost any weight in 4 weeks, chances are it’s not because you’re gaining lots of muscle and “muscle weighs more than fat.” Chances are it’s because you’re just not losing fat. Sorry Sally, but you’re just failing to create the caloric deficit that is required for fat loss to take place.


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I've been working out and still no weight loss


I doubt that you are eating only 100 calories per day and doing "Much" weight lifting" because your body would not be getting enough fuel and you'd collapse . If you really want to get rid of the weight . Lastly: Don't say you want to "Lose" the weight . So; if you lose the weight, do you want it to come back ? You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3 GP, 3 GPP, MP 4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600 MB. You can only upload a photo (png, jpg, jpeg) or a video (3gp, 3gpp, mp4, mov, avi, mpg, mpeg, rm). You can only upload a photo or a video.


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Help! Been working out 8 weeks and no weight loss


I've been working out very consistantly for the past 9 weeks with the exception of one week when I was sick. The only explanation is that I am gaining more weight in muscle. Muscle weighs more than fat, so it's not uncommon to actually gain a little weight when you start working out, even if you're losing fat. What has helped me through a similar time was getting a scale that measures body fat as well as weight. Just a side note to add to that: Your body fat % is higher in the morning than at night (I have no idea why, but it seems to be universal), so just remember that if you do start measuring that to do it in the evenings (otherwise when you get up in the morning after measuring it at night, you'll be like, "WHAT? There's also a little handheld device that just does body fat %, not weight. The scales all take into account your gender, height and age (at least if you're an adult or a child), and the one thing I don't like about my scale is that it doesn't store that information, so I have to enter it all every time I use it. You can also purchase scales that measure Body Fat online (I know Amazon.com has some), and I've been told that Target may carry them. You might also find it helpful to measure your progress in ways not involving the scale. Have you taken your measurements? How is your blood pressure and resting heart rate? Your body may be showing all sort of positive and wonderful "side effects" to your dieting/exercising that your scale may not reflect.


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Exercise Vs. Diet : The Truth About Weight Loss


Diet: The Truth About Weight Loss. "Yes, you can lose weight with diet alone, but exercise is an important component. Without it, only a portion of your weight loss is from fat - you're also stripping away muscle and bone density. The number on the scale may not sound as impressive, but because muscle takes up less space than fat does, you look smaller and your clothes fit better. Data show that to lose weight with exercise and keep it off, you don't need to run marathons. And, of course, beyond burning fat, people shouldn't forget that exercise can have other impressive health perks, like improving the quality of your sleep, lowering your cholesterol and reducing your stress level." "As a rule of thumb, weight loss is generally 75 percent diet and 25 percent exercise. An analysis of more than 700 weight loss studies found that people see the biggest short-term results when they eat smart. That way, you should be able to lose weight no matter how much you exercise." The Last Word: While diet and exercise are both important for long-term weight loss, remember this: "You can't out-exercise a bad diet," says Talbott.


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Help! Working out HARD - No weight loss


I then started paying more attention to the scale and made it my mission to lose a final 10 lbs by the summer. My weight stayed stagnant so I began doing cardio at the begging of March and since then I've gone to the gym virtually every day. I alternate between 1 hour on the elliptical at a reasonably high intensity and lifting every other day. On my days off of work I lift AND do an hour of cardio, spending about 2.5 hours at the gym. My diet is still the same as when I was losing weight. I just weighed myself and the scale said I was 137.5. I am working so freaking hard and losing ZERO weight. Read the stickies to figure out your TDEE and then eat 10-20% under that and you'll lose weight. I get that the only way to lose weight is through a caloric deficit. The problem I am having is that I should have a deficit but I'm still not losing anything. On the days I burn 800 calories on the elliptical (at least 4x a week for the last month) I should have a deficit of 400 calories minimum. If I could rule out all of the above then it must be my diet and I will adjust accordingly.


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No weight loss after 3 months! what am I doing wrong


When I started with the trainer I began cutting back on food but then he showed me Fitday in mid-Feb and I was hooked. I have kept calories between 1500 to 1800 for the most part (seemed reasonable for a 1-1.25/week weight loss). He has me keeping protein around 30% and carbs around 25% - leaves about 45% for fat which seemed high but he says not to worry b/c it comes from good fat and it's most important to keep protein high/carbs low. I only weigh myself once/month so that I don't get depressed or obsessed with the scale. After the first 2 months I told myself that it was going to a slow process/maybe muscle gain/etc. But it has been 3 months now and I'm a bit worried. I'm not going to give up on this weight loss but I really need a positive motivator! I hate to say this, but 3x a week would not help me to lose weight, I have to be at it 5-6 hours/week or there is no change. The trainer clearly has you on some sort of muscle building routine, which will not make much difference in the scale. I think you probably need to make it clear to the trainer that you want to get in shape and lose weight, which would most certainly add some cardio to your routine, and possibly a lower caloric intake (IDK because you didn't give any details about your current height/weight, gender). I agree with almeeker; putting cardio in is a good way to burn calories, but definitely use it in addition to, not instead of, the weight work. Just because your trainer says one thing doesn't mean it is the answer for you personally. For years I was on the low-fat bandwagon and wondered why I never lost as much as I wanted to. Good luck and hang in there; your answers will come to you. And now that you don't have to be perfect, you can be good.


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Working Out and Still not Losing Weight? Here Are 7


Do you eat well, exercise often, and still feel like you’re not losing that stubborn weight? If you’re not losing weight, the first place you should be looking is the kitchen. While the exact foods you should be eating depend heavily on your body type, metabolism, and other factors, a good rule of thumb is to stick to all natural, whole foods . Look for foods that have the fewest ingredients on the label—if you can’t pronounce it, it’s probably not something you want to be putting in your body. If you’ve already cleaned up your diet big time and you’re still not losing weight, it may be that you’re simply eating too much. The moment you start depriving yourself is when you start to feel like you’re missing out on something and you want to binge. The more muscle tone your body has, the more fat you’ll burn. When you do achieve that afterburn and you’re really feeling your workout the next day, those are the days to focus on different muscle groups. Or, if you prefer to work out your whole body, establish a workout routine where you work your entire body one day and then take the next day to do light cardio, stretching , or complete rest. It’s during those periods that your body does most of the actual fat burning. When you have a healthy balance of exercise-related stress and recovery time, your body is healthy and can lose its excess fat. Cortisol is both normal and important when working out, it’s involved in processes that give your muscles the energy needed to get moving. When you stop exercising, your body stops producing cortisol; however, it may not be quite as easy to turn off the mental stressors going on in your life.


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Working Out and not Losing Weight


In fact, your body needs carbs, but LIMIT the carb intake to only fruits and vegetables and try to time that intake to pre-post workout snacks. Here is a good time to eat fruits, juice, sport drink, or something high on the glycemic index to help with energy later in the workout. However, if you are doing an easier longer distance / easier paced cardio workout - skip eating and just take some water along with you on your pre-breakfast workout. As long as you are staying in the aerobic zone you should be OK with a moderate intensity workout. Foods with protein like eggs, dairy foods, meats, and of course good carbohydrates like fruits and vegetables to help you recover and be ready for the next workout. Lunch - You need a big salad that is rich in green, leafy and colorful vegetables, top off with strawberries for a good taste that will help you limit dressings. Walking or getting in a second easier workout after dinner is a good way to burn some calories as well, but you have to be careful not to do too much as it will affect your early morning workout this next day. Also arrange the workouts so you do anerobic first then aerobic activity second - see Cardio Vs Resistance for more details and why! Stew Smith is a former Navy SEAL and fitness author certified as a Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) with the National Strength and Conditioning Association. If you are interested in starting a workout program to create a healthy lifestyle - check out the Military.com Fitness e Book store and the Stew Smith article archive at Military.com.


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Exercise But No Weight Loss


You can try a few tricks to boost the effects of your exercise to stimulate weight loss, but even if you remain the same weight, exercise still improves your health significantly. When you exercise but don’t limit your food intake, then your body naturally craves more food, to make up for the energy you spent exercising. This happens even if you eat more than your body truly needs for energy. If you consume as many calories as you burn each day, not including your workouts, then exercising will lead to weight loss more easily. If you eat fewer calories than you burn, and you also exercise, then weight loss becomes even more likely. Of muscle, then you will weigh the same amount, but your body will be smaller. Through exercising, you could burn fat effectively, increase your strength, improve your health and become more slender - without ever seeing a change on the scale. Because the scale reflects more than simply fat burned, you should also measure your body periodically; you might lose inches even if you don’t lose pounds. If you have burned enough calories to lose fat successfully, then your measurements will slowly shrink. If you wish that exercise only burned fat, without building muscle, then remember that muscle burns slightly more calories than fat, even when you’re just sitting around.


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18 Ways to Lose Weight Faster to Break Out of a Weight


Working out more often during the day will help you lose weight faster ONLY IF your 2+ daily workouts burns more overall calories than if you did just one daily workout. If you've been doing the same weight loss workout everyday then over time YOU & YOUR body will get used to the same workout and you'll hit a weight loss plateau and at that point you'll need to do a complelely diffent weight loss workout but here's a real world example of how this works… You'll lose weight much faster than someone who does the same exact workout every day because your body will never get used to what you're doing so Use a fat loss workout log to help you track your workouts so you can always beat your last workout. Fact: The more time you spend in temperatures under 66℉ (19℃) = the faster you'll lose weight becaue your body has to burn fat to generate enough heat (energy) to keep you warm as verified in this test where people burned 410 caloies every 2 hours simply by sitting in a 66℉ (19℃) room. Then you may need to eat 1700 calories or less (that is if you don't exercise) to break out of your weight loss plateau because… Your metabolism burns less calories each time you lose weight to maintain your NEW LOWER weight because It takes less energy or calories to move a lighter body after losing weight so… Intermittent fasting helps you break out of your weight loss plateau by helping you burn more fat faster while you're on a weight loss plan. Protein helps you lose weight faster in 2 ways… Use the calculator below to see how much protein you need to lose weight faster… Type in how many calories you eat per day in the box below and then click the Enter button to see me how much protein you need to lose weight faster… See How to Burn More Fat While Working Out for more info but this is a good fat burning trick you should only use if you have less than 10 pounds to lose. See how fast you can really lose weight & also see Why it's tougher to lose your last 10 pounds but remember this… The closer you are to your weight loss goal = The longer it's going to take to lose your last 10, 20, or even 30 pounds and… The further away you are from your weight loss goal and/or the more overweight you are = the faster you can expect to lose weight at the start of any weight loss program but whenever you hit a weight loss plateau… Do any combination of the tips on this page to break out of your weight loss plateau and wait at least 2-to-4 weeks to see if you broken out of your plateau.


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Working Out But Gaining Weight? Here's Why - Coach Calorie


If you have not exercised regularly in months, you can expect to add a couple of pounds at the beginning, but have no fear, this weight gain is good weight gain, and it will do nothing to keep you from reaching your goals as long as you understand what is actually going on. Your body stores energy in two main ways – fat and glycogen. Your body mostly stores glycogen in the muscles, but it also stores it in the liver. Taking that one step further, the average person can store about 15 g/kg of body weight of glycogen [2] . Water Weight and Fat Are Not the Same. It is so important that you get over the idea of weight during your weight loss program. Read more about the difference between weight loss and fat loss. If you’re not measuring your body fat, you’re navigating in the dark. Measuring your body fat will tell you how much of that weight gain was lean body mass and how much of it was fat. Be prepared for a little weight gain at the beginning of your weight loss program, and understand where it’s coming from. Take before and after body fat measurements, and have confidence that you are doing what you need to do to not only reach your weight loss goals, but to be healthy both on the inside and out.


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I Am Working Out But Gaining Weight, HELP! - Calorie Secrets


So why are you sweating it out at the gym and still gaining weight and how can this be prevented? Reasons you may gain weight when working out. When you start working you for the first time or maybe even change your routine and start a new type of exercise, you are likely to gain muscle. Remember that weight is not the be all and end all when it comes to how you look and feel. Muscle is also more metabolically active that fat, so over time having more muscle can help you burn more calories even when you are not working out , which may help with longer term weight loss. To lose weight, a combination of working out and healthy eating is the best way to achieve results. These are extreme cases, but it is important to remember that just by going to the gym, you are not going to burn sufficient calories to lose weight. If you have been working out in the same way for a while, it is quite common to reach a plateau with your weight loss, even if you are still working out. There may be other contributing factors that can lead to weight gain, even if you are working out. All of these are very high in calories and can easily cancel out the calories you burn.


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7 Workout Mistakes That Keep You From Losing Belly Fat


There are few things more discouraging than putting your time in at the gym and still not seeing results. Some common mistakes that can stall your progress and find out what you can do to get on track toward ditching stubborn belly fat once and for all. People who consumed a post-exercise protein drink gained more fat-burning muscle mass and lost 50% more body fat than those who didn't refuel after working out, reports a study in the journal Fitness Management. "When you have more energy, you'll be able to lift heavier weights and get more muscle-building benefits, which will help you burn fat everywhere, including your belly." Mistake: You take a break between sets. "Even though weight training is anaerobic, if you string 4 to 6 exercises together without any breaks between each one, you create an aerobic benefit so your heart rate goes up and you burn more calories than you would if you rest between sets," Tumminello says. Mistake: Your weights are too light. To get more fat-burning muscle, you need to keep challenging your muscles by lifting heavier weights, says Rachel Cosgrove, author of The Female Body Breakthrough. If you've been working out regularly, increase your weight by roughly 10% for a few moves each workout. For example, if you do 8 exercises, choose 2 exercises and increase those weights while the others stay the same (if you've been using 10-pound weights, go up to 12). The following week, choose 2 more exercises and increase the weight for those. In addition to putting you at risk of injury, it can stall your progress. If you don't give your body ample time to recover between exercise sessions (such as doing back-to-back strength-training workouts), your muscles are in a constant state of being broken down and aren't getting the opportunity to repair, which is how you gain fat-torching muscle mass, she adds. Your body also perceives excess exercise as a stressor, which can boost levels of stress hormones and cause you to store rather than shed belly fat. Mistake: You rely only on your workout to blast belly fat.


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Nutrition and Dieting : WORKING OUT YET NO WEIGHT LOSS


I have been working out 7 days a week for about 10 weeks now.  Now I have leveled off and have lost nothing for about 3 weeks.    Thank you for your nutrition question.  It sounds like have a good exercise and eating routine. Protein is by far the most satiating and the most thermic (i.e. The process of digesting it raises your metabolism). The best sources are from animals, as these contain the complete profile of essential amino acids and are more bio-available, which means that your body can use them more effectively and efficiently. You need water to burn fat and if you are drinking caffeinated or alcoholic beverages you are dehydrating your cells further. Trade your coffee and tea for decaf. Eat small meals and snacks throughout the day. Ask for sauces on the side and monitor how much you use. Everything counts so pay attention to how much you are actually eating and make sure you are on track with optimal amounts of protein, limiting your starchy carbs and fat and getting in enough non-starchy vegetables. Learn all of the different names for sugars and be sure you are choosing foods that are low in sugar and fat, high in nutrient value and fiber. I have also authored other books such as "Ask the Nutritionists" ,"The Healthy Pregnancy Cookbook: Eating Twice As Well for a Healthy Pregnancy." My work experience includes nutritional counseling and healthy cooking classes.


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Eating right, Working out but not losing weight


I used to weight between 89 and 94lbs at the most! I ran a marathon a few years ago and shortly after that is when I gained the weight. I have been training for half marathons (I ran one in April 2006) so I have been keeping the cardio up with running 3-4 days during the week and then 5-10 miles on the weekends. She claimed that I needed to rev up my workouts by doing interval training and then eating more protein and more times of the day. For the last two months, I have been eating 5 times a day (about 1000-1200 calories) Each meal has protein and carbs and I get my 5 a day fruits and veggies.


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Working Out and Still not Losing Weight? Reasons Why


Do you eat well, exercise often, and still feel like you’re not losing that stubborn weight? While the exact foods you should be eating depend heavily on your body type, metabolism, and other factors, a good rule of thumb is to stick to all natural, whole foods . Look for foods that have the fewest ingredients on the label—if you can’t pronounce it, it’s probably not something you want to be putting in your body. If you’ve already cleaned up your diet big time and you’re still not losing weight, it may be that you’re simply eating too much. The moment you start depriving yourself is when you start to feel like you’re missing out on something and you want to binge. The more muscle tone your body has, the more fat you’ll burn. When you do achieve that afterburn and you’re really feeling your workout the next day, those are the days to focus on different muscle groups. Or, if you prefer to work out your whole body, establish a workout routine where you work your entire body one day and then take the next day to do light cardio, stretching , or complete rest. When you have a healthy balance of exercise-related stress and recovery time, your body is healthy and can lose its excess fat. When you stop exercising, your body stops producing cortisol; however, it may not be quite as easy to turn off the mental stressors going on in your life.


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HELP!!! Working out hard, eating healthy and no weight


Working out hard, eating healthy and no weight loss! Okay so here's the deal, For the past month I've been working out really hard and eating healthy. I work out at the family Y and have made sure that if I didn't make 5 days of week of working out plus the karate I would make sure and do four. The usual reason for not losing weight is that you eat more than you think. Its always a great idea to find out how much you burn in a  regular day no exercise added and then from there make sure you get plenty of calories enough for weight loss. Another reason your weight loss may be stalled, is because you are also lifting weights, and doing karates, not to mention the elliptical is no ordinary cardio workout, it also involves muscle toning in the legs, so chances are that there may be some muscle forming. So this is a great indiciation that you are burning and losing body fat and gaining muscle mass.meaning the scale shouldnt be your only source for progress on your weight loss plan. Consult your worries with him/her, and have them rule out the possible reason for the weight not coming off (that being a medical condition). If you do have a medical condition that prevents you from losing, proper treatment should asses the problem and aid in weight loss. Some days I tend to eat a few over and some days the number is a few under. In the last 7 days I have averaged 1,344 calories a day, and have done 20-30 minutes of cardio a day for four days.  Use the link jrkv posted and see where you are for your burn then subtract 500-750 from that to get your cal target.  You are waaay younger and more active than me and I lost on 1600. Alaskanqt- I would say the same thing to you, and make sure you are getting some healthy fats in your diet as well.


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6 Reasons You're not Losing Weight - What's Causing Your


You're working like a dog — hitting the gym, tracking calories — but you just can't shrink your pooch. "Body weight can fluctuate by up to five pounds on any given day, so the amount you shed can easily get lost," says Pamela Wartian Smith, MD, the author of Why You Can't Lose Weight. But that's not all: When you're dehydrated, your kidneys can't function properly, so the body turns to the liver for additional support. Because the liver is working so hard, more of the fat you consume is stored rather than burned off. Protein enhances the feeling of satiety and prevents your losing muscle as you lose fat. You also have dietary thermogenesis, which is the energy you burn to process and use the food you eat, on your side. But here's the real shocker: Working out can make you retain water. "To ensure that you don't get dehydrated, the plasma in your bloodstream will store an extra two to four pounds of water," explains Michele S. I've increased my water and protein intake, I move more throughout the day, and I'm trying to stress less. When the scale bums you out, here are three other ways to gauge your progress.


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10 Diet and Fitness Rumors That Slow


First, let's tackle the myth that a pound of muscle weighs more than a pound of fat. That said, muscle is denser than fat and takes up less room, so two women who weigh the same can look much different if one has a higher ratio of lean muscle mass to fat, says Valentour. Even though you burn calories and fat when you exercise, it's often not as much as you think—or what the readout on the treadmill tells you. Biologically, men are built with more lean muscle mass (the compact, tight muscles that keep metabolism humming) than women are—meaning his metabolism is working at a 5 to 10% higher rate (even if he's the same height and weight as you) when you're lying on the couch together. Just the act of chewing fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean cuts of meat can increase your calorie burn by up to 30%! The fiber and protein in such foods take so much effort to digest that your body doesn't absorb some of their calories. The Active Calorie Diet is a smart new plan from Prevention magazine that takes advantage of all the new knowledge about calories. A report published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that a MUFA-rich diet helped people lose small amounts of weight and body fat without changing their calorie intakes. Many people eat at night out of boredom or other emotions instead of hunger, and they wind up consuming more calories than they need for the day—calories that are then stored as fat. Also, people who eat at night may wake up without an appetite and skip breakfast, the meal that helps control calorie intake throughout the day. And if you sip water instead of sugary drinks, the calories you've saved will help shed pounds. What you're trying to do when you eat diet foods and drink diet soda is to cheat your body, says Ashley Koff, RD, resident dietitian on the new Lifetime show Love Handles: Couples in Crisis. And you might be getting weight loss results but no health benefits." She says many people eventually get frustrated that they became dependent on these products. More from Prevention:  14 Diet Foods That Make You Fat. Out-of-whack hormones and a slowing metabolism are a couple of the weight gain culprits.


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5 Ways Your Workout Routine is Keeping You from Losing


Is your workout causing you to use the "I burned it, I earned it," excuse when it comes to your diet? Olson recommends writing down what you are eating to keep track of calories consumed, and then subtracting the calories you burned, for your true daily number. The solution: Figueroa recommends following a workout plan that is appropriate for your current fitness level—one that will still challenge your body without completely draining it. Your workout burns fewer calories than you think. "Many machines do not require you to put in your body weight and, therefore, the calorie output is often based on a ‘reference weight' often used in science of 155 pounds," Olson says. "So, if you weigh 135 pounds, for example, you would not burn the same calories as someone who is at the reference weight." Doing only cardio workouts or the same strength workout over and over means you are sacrificing the opportunity to build lean muscle mass and challenge your body in new ways (translation: burn more calories doing something new), and you may plateau because of it. Doing the same workout routine over and over means your body doesn't have to work as hard to perform it after a few weeks. "The more ‘learned' we are, the easier the activity is to our bodies, which means you will actually burn fewer calories than you did when the activity or your routine was new to you." Even adding workouts like yoga and Pilates that don't typically burn a large amount of calories, if they are new to your body, will create some nice changes in your physique simply from being a new challenge to your movement and workout patterns, Olson says.


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Water Retention and Weight Loss : You Can


Water Retention and Weight Loss: You Can Lose Fat, But Not Weight? If you want to know how water retention can prevent weight loss and even make you look fatter (and what to do about it), you want to read this article. You see, the culprit is likely water retention , and if you don’t know how to deal with it properly, it can fuel an emotional firestorm of anger and frustration. And by the end of this article, you’re going to know what causes water retention, why so many people trying to lose weight struggle with it, and how to bring everything back to normal, including your weight loss. But then we wake up and have to accept that in the real world, weight loss can be quite erratic. The fat you lose through proper dieting can be obscured–both on the scale and in the mirror–by additional water that your body is holding on to. And what can you do about it? And large amounts of exercise tend to struggle the most with water retention as well.) Yes, this is a weight loss article that’s telling you to eat more and move less, because if you’re trying to lose weight but are holding a lot of water, you can probably benefit from both. You Probably Need to Adjust Your Sodium and Potassium Intake. If you want some more strategies for relaxing your mind and body, check out this article. The Bottom Line on Water Retention and Weight Loss. What’s your take on water retention and weight loss?


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Been working out for the past month and no weight loss


I did lose 6 pounds the first week I am doing Herbalife which replaces two meals with shakes and have a colorful meal after two weeks i guess i wasn't taking in enough calories and that is why I didn't lose any weight so I fixed that problem but now this last week i worked out so hard doing Zumba and. Show more I did lose 6 pounds the first week I am doing Herbalife which replaces two meals with shakes and have a colorful meal after two weeks i guess i wasn't taking in enough calories and that is why I didn't lose any weight so I fixed that problem but now this last week i worked out so hard doing Zumba and another workout program, and sometimes ab circle or the elliptical. I did lose 6 pounds the first week I am doing Herbalife which replaces two meals with shakes and have a colorful meal after two weeks i guess i wasn't taking in enough calories and that is why I didn't lose any weight so I fixed that problem but now this last week i worked out so hard doing Zumba and another workout program, and sometimes ab circle or the elliptical.


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The Truth About Exercise and Weight Loss


Exercise is only part of the weight loss story. "They will say, 'I have been working out three days a week for 30 minutes for the past three months, and I have lost 2 pounds. Kushner tells patients that exercise is very good for them, but for weight loss, he emphasizes starting with a healthy diet. Then living a physically active lifestyle for the rest of your life is going to be important for keeping your weight off." But they stress that the amount of exercise is key. Hill, Ph D, director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado at Denver, says it's easier to cut 1,000 calories from a bloated diet than to burn off 1,000 calories through exercise. "But there are many, many studies that show that exercise is associated with weight loss when done in enough volume and consistently," he says. For Pamela Peeke, spokeswoman for the American College of Sports Medicine's "Exercise is Medicine" campaign, fitness is a crucial part of a weight loss program , but it's for reasons that go beyond calorie burning.


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No weight loss during breastfeeding


I lost 30 pounds by one month pp, but I am currently 6 months pp and haven't lost a damn pound since! I have not lost any weight and I gained 60 with this pregnancy. With my first child I gained 60 pounds also and I nursed my daughter for 18 months and lost no weight at all and I had been eating healthy and exercising. 2 years later the weight just dropped off of me and I lost 50 pound and 7 inches on my waist. I don't think breast feeding really helps people lose weight because I have some friends who did not breast feed and they lost the weight in 2 months after having their babies and I have friends who breast fed and lost no weight at all including me. I exclusively breastfeed, I have been exercising as best I can since I was 9 weeks postpatum and I am sure I do not eat enough calories, but have not lost a pound doing so. Its so annoying and I feel so upset about the whole thing. I have been walking and doing the best I can in terms of eating right. I gained 25 lbs this pregnancy, and this is my 3rd baby. My baby is 5 months old and I haven't lost 1lb since leaving hospital. Breastfeeding helped tremendously with the first 2 and I was back in shape within 8 months. With baby no.3 it took longer, I only started seeing results after about 6 months and now with baby no. 4 I lost 22 lbs within the first 3 months and then the weight loss became stagnant, I am struggling with the last 30lbs. I was 34 when I fell pregnant with my last one and even the pregnancy took a toll.


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I Have Been Working Out and Eating Right But I'm not Losing


If you’re eating right and working out but are not losing weight, it’s time to adjust your routine. Changing the type of physical activity and frequency of your workouts can promote faster calorie burning. Evaluating your diet and looking for opportunities for improvement also promote weight loss. Talk with your doctor to rule out medical reasons you might have difficulty losing weight. If you aren’t losing weight, examine your workout intensity. And, after your workout has ended, your body continues to burn higher levels of calories throughout the day. Eat foods that can make your workouts more productive, such as leafy greens and berries. If you’re working out and eating a low-calorie diet but are still not losing weight, examine your portion sizes. Your body stores the excess calories as fat. Read food labels carefully, and measure your portion sizes to prevent eating extra calories. For example, for a cup serving, eat an amount the size of your fist. A serving of protein is the size of the palm of your hand. An ounce of cheese is about the size of your thumb.


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4 Reasons Working Out Could Be Causing You to Gain Weight


Right off the bat, it’s important to note that this doesn’t happen to everyone, so this isn’t a preemptive excuse not to exercise! However, if you do happen to gain weight when starting a new program, odds are that it’s not fat, but rather temporary water weight due to inflammation. That said, it might be a few other things, all of them fixable, so let’s run through the list and see if we can find a match. When you incur injury, including microtrauma, your body releases various substances generally known as inflammatory mediators that swarm the area and perform triage, bringing in healing white blood cells and opening up blood vessels to flush out debris and toxins. There’s so much going on that the area swells up, or inflames. The general consensus in the fitness community is that the most weight someone new to fitness will gain in muscle is about 2 pounds a month, but that’s not a hard-and-fast number. The first one would be that you’re not following a proper diet. Don’t be afraid to read the white book that came with your DVDs. If done right with the proper nutritional support, rest, and recovery, it toughens you up, fortifying your body against further stress. Exercise will contribute to your total stress load, becoming part of the problem as opposed to part of the solution. So if you work twelve hours a day, drink more than two standard alcoholic drinks a night on a regular basis, smoke, sleep less than 7–8 hours a night, eat a junk-filled Standard American Diet or an overly restricted low-calorie diet, and attempt one of our graduate programs when you’re 100 pounds overweight with a history of knee issues, exercise will tax your body just like all the bad habits on that list. First, that inflammation we discussed earlier won’t have the chance to give way to later phases of healing. If you’re looking for 300-esque abs, it’s going to take a little time (or some expensive CGI), so start with a program you can do and that will keep you motivated instead of burning you out. We’ll have a look under the hood, and have you back in action in no time. Do you have a question for our Ask the Expert column?


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Working out — and gaining weight? - Health


Working out — and gaining weight? How an exercise and diet plan can start off on the wrong track. Can starting a new exercise plan cause weight gain? Is that to be expected when you first start an exercise program? And the answer is no, the weight gain is not to be expected, says exercise physiologist John Ivy, head of kinesiology and health education at the University of Texas, Austin. And that weight is stored as fat. But don't fall into the trap of thinking that because you're exercising, it's OK to take in a bunch more calories, says Molly Kimball, a sports nutritionist at Ochsner Clinic's Elmwood Fitness Center in New Orleans. A: Yes, it's better to exercise and smoke than to be a chain-smoking couch potato. There's evidence, for example, that people who smoke and exercise regularly have lower risks of heart disease, cancer and diabetes than sedentary smokers, says Ivy. At the same time, realize that smoking is one of the worst things you can do for your health, and it's best if you stop now. Exercise may indeed help in that regard, according to Ivy. He says that smokers who embark on a fitness plan can become motivated to take better care of their health and stop lighting up.


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Why Am I not Losing Weight : 11 Reasons You’re Failing To


The reason you’re not losing weight is because you eat too much. Truth is, the key to weight loss (and weight gain) is and always will be calories. You’re counting calories and eating healthy and you know for sure that you’re eating the right amount that you need to eat in order to lose weight. So if you claim to consistently be eating the right amount of calories yet still aren’t losing weight, then you’re simply not in a caloric deficit and had to have screwed something up somewhere. You’re exercising like crazy and burning tons and tons of calories through cardio and weight training and are therefore in the caloric deficit you need to be in for weight loss to occur. Instead, it’s MUCH more likely that you’re just eating too many calories, not creating a caloric deficit, and are just not losing any fat, period. If so, you’ve hit the dreaded weight loss plateau and that can only mean one thing: you’re still eating too many calories. And this is all just another way of saying that you’re eating too many calories for your new current weight and the required caloric deficit no longer exists. In reality, you’re just not creating the caloric deficit that is required for weight loss to take place. And even in the cases when it IS happening to you, the reason for the lack of weight loss is still just a lack of a caloric deficit. Instead, the true culprit is calories and the fact that you’re either eating too many of them or not burning enough of them.


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Working out, but no weight results - Online Weight Loss


I see my waist getting thinner, but the scale shows nothing! Personal opinion, don't sweat the numbers on the scale. Excess fat is the health concern, not the weight. If you're working out, you're probably not losing muscle, which means you're losing fat, so don't sweat the scale, enjoy the thinner, even if ever so slighty, you. Muscle definitely weighs more than fat-and you may have gained enough muscle to not show a difference on the scale. Keep up the hard work, i'm sure in another week or two you will see those numbers going down :) But like the above posters said, the numbers don't tell the whole true story of your weight loss. If you ever figure out how NOT to look to the numbers to judge your progress.let me know! I agree with everyone above - don't sweat the number.if you can see your waist getting smaller, that's fabulous. I stayed the same weight, might have lost a little bit in inches, but nothing too noticible. That might not seem like a lot, but to someone who had been at the same weight for months, it was a huge break through. If your waist is getting smaller you know you are doing it right. You also can tell the way clothes fit.


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Diet Talk : Working out, Eating right, and NO WEIGHT LOSS


If a person goes from being a couch potato - so to say - to exercising most days and watching what you eat and counting calories, seems like the weight should just fall off! Just because you start exercising does not mean the fat will just drop off. And sometimes its just a phase, work through it and you will loose weight! If you follow that rule you will lose weight. Look for a food guide called "Michi's ladder", if you eat the foods according to this guide you will lose weight. I have to eat natural, low fat, low carb, low sugar and then along with exercize the weight comes off fairly quickly. I dont mean to preach but I know how desprate I am to get my weight back off, and you sound similar. 1) How quickly do you gain the weight? If you that luxury, you might be able achieve a faster pace of weight loss but you, like most of us, live in the real world. Take your measurements for times that the scale might not match reality and pay attention to how your clothes fit, how you feel, and how much more you can acomplish physically. The first week you are likely to lose quite quickly.


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How to tell if you're working out hard enough to lose weight


I have gone to the mayo clinic website and it says for my workout to eat 2355 to 1766 calories per day. I have been swimming an hour per day for the past three days and plan to continue to do so. I am going to walk for an hour at least 5 days a week and then in a week work up to an hour and 30 minutes. I am 55, 5'7" and around 195. I want to lose weight because I have heredity-prone high blood pressure, and I know if I lose weight, I can get back off the medication. I worked out every day and the pounds came on. PLEASE just keep going and believe it can work for you. I have been trying to lose about 20-30 pounds for several months now and have actually gained about 10 pounds since I started. I go to the gym daily and do cardio for 30-45 min and then do some weight training. I'm a 25 years old female, 192lbs and 5'1 in height. I'm 5'10" and weigh 190 lbs. For now and then as your weight loss rate slows down you can use this. I'm 155pounds and 5'3. The only time I seem to lose weight is when I starve myself and eat 200 calories or less a day. I have been working out 6 days a week and following a healthy diet.


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